2014-15 Undergraduate Catalog

History

History Program Coordinator

Dr. Tiffany Ziegler | email:  tiffany.ziegler@minotstateu.edu 

History Program Mission

We prepare graduates to appreciate, craft, and practice history.

Welcome!

History at Minot State University prepares students for diverse careers in Education, Law, Public Service, Consulting, and many other areas.  Whichever major a student chooses (the Bachelor of Arts / BA or the Bachelor of Science in Education / BSE) the core history coursework is identical.  The key difference is in the supplemental coursework outside the major:  BA students select a minor and concentration, while BSE students complete professional education coursework instead of a minor, and they select one or more support areas instead of a concentration.

Students also are encouraged to pursue history as a complement to other majors.  Those interested in declaring a history minor or concentration should visit with any history faculty member.

The history department maintains a web page with additional information about the program:  http://history.minotstateu.edu

History Program Goals and Outcomes

Goal Outcome
To study and demonstrate understanding of history subject matter and methodology through such perspectives as globalism, multiculturalism, gender, and ethnicity.Department faculty include these themes throughout the history curriculum; history majors will encounter them continually in their academic career. To ensure a more comprehensive understanding of global or multicultural themes of all history majors and an understanding of non-Western history and culture, majors must distribute their course work among the areas of American, European and non-Western history. The department also offers courses specifically focused on women’s history, Native American history, and African American history.
To study and demonstrate familiarity with historical content for a variety of periods and places.All majors must take courses in American, European and non-Western history. These courses variously address culture, society, government, change and continuity across time.
To develop and demonstrate advanced critical and analytical thinking and writing skills, including the ability to present and support an argumentative thesis to specialists and to the broader public.Persuasive writing is a primary objective of our department. Majors are introduced to critical thinking and writing as soon as they enter a 100 level course, and refine these skills in all successive courses, as they are called upon to render valid historical judgments in class discussions, oral presentations, examination essays, and research papers. Majors develop skills to present and support persuasive arguments.
To analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources in the service of historical methodology.Analysis of primary and secondary sources figures prominently in history courses at MSU. Initially, students in survey courses are exposed to and become familiar with individual documents and excerpts; intermediate level courses require more extensive contact with primary documents such as novels, memoirs, speeches, and film. In addition, these courses include substantial work with secondary source monographs. Advanced level research courses expect extensive work and analysis of primary and secondary sources. This is critical for students if they seek to research topics for themselves and form their own interpretations.
To evidence ability to become informed on historiographical issues, through the use of standard and current journals, books and reviews.Students must be able to locate and use standard works of history. They must also be able to ascertain the trends in the profession by reading current books, book reviews, and professional journals. This goal is a central component of our practice and method course (280), but it is also firmly tied into all of our elective courses. Moreover, students will learn that the writing of history is conditioned by the period and society which produces it.
To develop and demonstrate a sense of chronology, change, and continuity as they pertain to history.History courses emphasize the importance of student understanding of the dimension of time and change in human existence. A sense for the crucial relationship of the past to the present is emphasized in each course.

 


Bachelor of Arts With a Major in History

General Education
General Education courses38-40
Required Core
Introductory Courses 9
(History survey used for General Education may not be repeated here.)
Survey
Survey or 200-level course
Survey or 200-level course
Historical Methodology3
Practice and Method
History Electives21
History electives in both sections (geographic and distributed) to meet the following requirements. Check course description for category codes. No more than two electives can be at the 200-level. At least one must be a 400-level seminar. No elective can be a GE course.
Geographical (US/European/non-Western) See Regional Elective Lists for details.
US
EU
NW
Distributed
Elective
Elective
Elective
Topical/Thematic or Internship
Historiography: Capstone3
Historiography
Portfolio
Additional Degree Requirements
2.0 GPA required in the major for graduation.
Second Major or Minor and/or Concentration(s)
Major, Minor and/or Concentration (33 -36 credits)33
Electives
Elective courses to reach at least 120 credits for graduation. 10-13 credits depending on the second major, minor, or concentration(s).13
Total Hours120-122

 

 

 

Bachelor of Science in Education With a Major in History 

General Education
General Education Courses38-40
Must take PSY 111 as one Social Science General Education elective. The other Social Science General Education elective must come from the General Education courses found in the Core Social Science Support area choices (see category below). This course will determine the student’s core area specialization.
Required Core
Introductory Courses9
(Survey used for General Education may not be repeated here.)
Survey
Survey or 200-level course
Survey or 200-level course
Historical Methodology3
Practice and Method
History Electives21
History electives in both sections (geographic and distributed) to meet the following requirements. Check course description for category codes. No more than two electives can be at the 200-level. At least one must be a 400-level seminar. No elective can be a GE course.
Geographical (US/European/non-Western) See Regional Elective Lists for details.
US
EU
NW
Distributed
Elective
Elective
Elective
Topical/Thematic or Internship
Historiography: Capstone3
Historiography
Portfolio
Social Science Support Courses9
Select at least ONE area (Geography, Political Science, Economics) and complete 12 credits. BSE students may complete additional areas (12 credits each) for certification in those areas.
NOTE: ESPB requires 12 credits in each selected support area. 3 of these credits are taken as Social Science General Education (see above). The remaining 9 credits complete the selected area for a total of 12 credits. Area specific course requirements:
ECON: 201, 202, and any two advanced ECON electives
GEOG: 110 and any three GEOG electives
POLS: 115, 116, 220, and one upper level POLS elective
Professional Education Sequence38
Elective Courses
May be Taken Before Admission to Teacher Education
Foundations of Education
Educational Psychology
Curriculum, Planning & Assessment
Child & Adolescent Psychology
Introduction to Exceptional Children
Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in America
Admission to Teacher Education Required
Technology in Teaching
Managing the Learning Environment
Teaching Diverse Learners
Secondary History/Social Science Teaching Methods
Secondary Hist/Soc Sci Practicum
Student Teaching, Secondary
Additional Degree Requirements
2.0 GPA required in major for graduation
Total Hours121-123

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Program/Degree/Graduation Requirements

  • Admission to Teacher Education
    • History BSE majors must successfully complete the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) before applying to the Teacher Education Program. For more information on PPST requirements go to http://history.minotstateu.edu.
    • 2.5 GPA required in major for admission to Teacher Education
  • History Portfolio
  • Graduation Requirements
    • History BSE majors must take the appropriate PRAXIS II content area exam and the PLT exam. Their official scores must be reported to the university before graduation. (Graduation requirements do no mandate specific scores on these exams, but the North Dakota Teacher licensure requirements do. These include successful PRAXIS II content area and PLT exams. For more information go to http://history.minotstateu.edu.)
    • 2.5 GPA required in major for graduation.

Electives (2-11 cr)

Additional Certification Option

A history major who takes coursework in an additional social science support area may apply for a Social Science Composite major equivalency teaching certification from the North Dakota Education and Standards Practices Board (ESPB), in addition to his/her history teaching certification. The candidate must:

  • Complete the coursework specified for two of the three state-defined core areas (ECON, GEOG, and POLS from the Core Social Science Support Course list)
  • Successfully complete the Social Science PRAXIS II exam.

 

History Minor (Non-Teaching)

Take 21 credits in HIST courses

At least two courses in the minor need to be taken at the 300-400 level
At least one non-General Education course on American History 3
At least one non-General Education course on European History 3
At least one non-General Education course on non-Western History 3
Additional history courses to reach 21 credits total12
Total Hours21

 

History Minor (Teaching)

Surveys
Select four of the following six courses: 12
Western Civilization I
Western Civilization II
US History to 1877
US History from 1877
World Civilizations to 1500
World Civilizations Since 1500
Modern World Origins
Electives
Non-General Education History electives at the 200-400 level. At least 2 courses must be at 300-400 level. 9
One U.S. History elective
One European History elective
One non-Western History elective
Teaching Methods
SS 391Secondary History/Social Science Teaching Methods3
SS 398Secondary Hist/Soc Sci Practicum1
Total Hours25

History Concentration

Select courses to total twelve semester hours. No more than six credits may come from:

Select 12 credits of survey and advanced coursework. No more than 6 credits can come from survey courses:12
Western Civilization I
Western Civilization II
US History to 1877
US History from 1877
World Civilizations to 1500
World Civilizations Since 1500
Modern World Origins
Non-survey History courses to reach 12 total credits
Total Hours12

Regional / Geographic Distribution for History BA and BSE students

History BA and BSE majors must take one course in each of the following geographic distribution areas:  European (EU), Non-Western (NW), United States (US).  In addition to the courses listed, the department also offers a variety of special topics and topical seminars that satisfy the EU/NW/US requirements.  Please contact the History Coordinator for more information.

EU Electives

HIST 241Renaissance and Reformation3
HIST 248Medieval History3
HIST 342The Age Of The Vikings3
HIST 343The Medieval Church3
HIST 347The Making of Modern Europe3
HIST 350Europe in 20th Century3
HIST 351The Mediterranean World3
HIST 352Medieval & Early Modern Women3
HIST 442The Crusades3
HIST 460Modern France and Francophone Society3
Special Topics Courses and Seminars may also satisfy this requirement. Consult with your History advisor.

NW Electives

HIST 206Islam And The Muslim World3
HIST 227History of Vietnam3
HIST 231Latin American History Survey3
HIST 240African History Survey3
HIST 337Imperialism in Asia3
HIST 338History of South Africa3
HIST 351The Mediterranean World3
HIST 363Atlantic History3
HIST 380History Of Mexico3
HIST 385History of Brazil3
HIST 435Latin American History Seminar3
HIST 440Comparative Slavery in the Americas3
HIST 442The Crusades3
Special Topics Courses and Seminars may also satisfy this requirement. Consult with your History advisor.

 

US Electives

HIST 203Modernization of Early America3
HIST 220North Dakota History3
HIST 315History of American Women3
HIST 319Colonial America3
HIST 320The Early Republic3
HIST 325Sectionalism and the Civil War3
HIST 328The Transformation of America3
HIST 336African American History3
HIST 430Native American Social History3
HIST 420Indian People of the Great Plains3
HIST 410Trans-Mississippi West3
HIST 41520th Century America3
Special Topics Courses and Seminars may also satisfy this requirement. Consult with your History advisor.

Courses

HIST 101. Western Civilization I. 3 Hours.

A survey of the political, intellectual, social and economic trends of Western Civilization from the Classical Age of the French Revolution. EU/C1.

HIST 102. Western Civilization II. 3 Hours.

A survey of the political, intellectual, social, and economic trends of Western Civilization from the French Revolution to the present. EU/C1.

HIST 103. US History to 1877. 3 Hours.

Survey of U.S. history from Colonial period to the end of Reconstruction. US/C1.

HIST 104. US History from 1877. 3 Hours.

Survey of U.S. history from the end of Reconstruction to present. US/C2.

HIST 203. Modernization of Early America. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce students to the major developments in American social, intellectual, and cultural history from discovery through the Civil War. The focusof the course will be on the concept of modernization; why, when, and how was life in America evolving toward those characteristics we consider part of modern life? Central topics will include cultural interaction, daily life, the development of a new society, American exceptionalism, the evolution of American intellectual thought, democratization, social movements, and the development of an American literature. Prerequisite: HIST 104. EU/T.

HIST 206. Islam And The Muslim World. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the history and culture for the wider Muslim world. In this course we will study three aspects of Islam and the Muslim World: Islam as religion, the 1,400 year history of Muslim civilization in all its diversity, and finally Islam today.

HIST 211. World Civilizations to 1500. 3 Hours.

World civilizations begin with earliest histories of organized human life in China, India, Africa, and Mesopotamia and end with Europe's emergence from the Middle Ages around 1500.

HIST 212. World Civilizations Since 1500. 3 Hours.

This course surveys non-Western History between 1500 and the present. It focuses on the continents of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, examining these continents' cultures and histories from their own perspectives. Special emphasis eill be placed on religion, organization of societies, continuity and discontinuity of cultures, interaction with Europe and North America, colonialism, and global exchange. NW/T.

HIST 215H. Modern World Origins. 3 Hours.

A seminar in the origins of the modern world. Class time will emphasize student discussion of assigned relevant historical sources, both primary and secondary. In addition, there will be extensive and varied writing assignments. Honors Program admission of 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor is required.

HIST 219. Environmental History. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the field of Environmental History. It will explore the relationship between people, communities, resources and the environment in the past and will study examples from the U.S., Europe, and other parts of the world. Students will use secondary literature and primary-source case studies to study major environmental themes related to conservation, resource management, land use, development, water, and pollution. Upon completion students will demonstrate understanding of the scope and depth of environmental issues in world history, of the methods historians have developed to approach such questions, and of major case studies related to rural and urban experiences.

HIST 220. North Dakota History. 3 Hours.

Survey of the trends and problems in the State of North Dakota and their relations to the upper Mississippi Valley area, from Indian heritage to the present. US/T.

HIST 227. History of Vietnam. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the history of Vietnam from its formation to the late twentieth century. Topics covered include Vietnam's cultural and historical origins, its place in South-East Asia, colonization under the French, the experience of WWII, the French and American wars in Vietnam, and Vietnam since the 1970s. NW/C1/C2.

HIST 230. Test Preparation. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to help students across the Minot State University campus who plan to take exams needed in order to complete major/minot requirements and/or for students struggling with these types of exams. The class is aimed primarily at education majors who are required to take the Principles in Learning and Teaching and the Praxis exams, and it is being designed at the gehest of many of our history majors who have had difficulty with the Praxis II. This is not to say, though, that the course is only for education or history majors. It is open to all students who have or will take these kinds of exams.

HIST 231. Latin American History Survey. 3 Hours.

Survey of the countries below the Rio Grande from pre-Colombian times to the present. Special attention to continuity of Native American culture, colonial legacies, identity, gender roles, revolutions, relations with the U.S., and land and income distribution. NW/T.

HIST 240. African History Survey. 3 Hours.

Africa has a wide variety of cultures and peoples. In this survey, we will study civilizations in as different areas as the Egyptian Nile, the MAlian savanna, the Congolian rainforest, and East Coast Swahili traders. Topics include; ancient Egypt, Islam, European colonialism and its consequences, apartheid, women, and kinship. NW/T.

HIST 241. Renaissance and Reformation. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of the important themes, both secular and relitious, of the Renaissance and Reformation eras. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU/ C1.

HIST 248. Medieval History. 3 Hours.

The study of Eurpoe, East, and West from the break-up of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance (1500). Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU/C1.

HIST 251. Introduction to Public History. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to public history, which is often simply defined as the practice of history outside of the classroom, produced for a non-academic audience. This simple definition belies complicated fundamental issues, such as what role the public audience does and should play in the determination of what issues are of historical concern, and how they should be handled. Starting with consideration of what public history is, and what are its purposes and basic questions, the class will then work on developing some of the basic skills that public historians need. Students will speak with and, in some cases, shadow current professionals in the field. They will be introduced to sources of historical information available in the local community and organizations of value to public historians. Ultimately, students will utilize the ideas and skills that they develop during the semester as they undertake a local historical research project that will culminate in a public presentation.

HIST 261. American Indian History. 3 Hours.

A survey of American Indian history from pre-contact to the present, providing an overview of major trends and developments. US/T.

HIST 280. Practice and Method. 3 Hours.

This colloquium introduces students to the tools, research, and writing methods, resources and theoretical approaches required in upper level history courses. It includes a small student-initiated research project that will allow students to refine their skills. The course also features discussion of reading that illustrate a wide variety of historical approaches and methods. To be taken upon declaring a major in history or social science. Course restricted to majors. (Offered spring semester only.).

HIST 299. Special Topics in History. 1-8 Hour.

These are flexible courses that may be taught depending on student needs. The design of the course is to present the student an opportunity to concentrate on various topics. Prerequisites may apply.

HIST 315. History of American Women. 3 Hours.

The experience on women in American history, with emphasis upon the continual change in women's role and differences brought about by region, ethnicity, and economic class. Prerequisites: HIST 103 or 104 or consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 319. Colonial America. 3 Hours.

Traces the development of the colonies from the time of European exploration and early English colonization to the confrontations between Britian and America in the 1760s and 1770s. Prerequisite: HIST 103 or 104 or consent of instructor. US/C1.

HIST 320. The Early Republic. 3 Hours.

Study of the social, intellectual, political, and diplomatic forces, issues, and personalities in America's formative (1781-1824) years. Prerequisite: HIST 103 or 104 or consent of instructor. US/C1.

HIST 325. Sectionalism and the Civil War. 3 Hours.

Traces the rise of sectionalism as a forcce on antebellum America leading to the Civil War. Prerequisite: HIST 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/C1.

HIST 328. The Transformation of America. 3 Hours.

Study of industrialization, urbanization, and immigration in America from1865 to 1901, focusing on the social, political. and international consequences of and reaction to economic change. Prerequisite: HIST 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 consent of instructor. US/C1.

HIST 336. African American History. 3 Hours.

Examines the history of African Americans in American society from 1619 to the present, including the West African cultural context, cultural retentions and changes in the American environment, and the emergence of cohesive African American culture. The course pays special attention to the ideas, contributions, and changing roles of African Americans with American society, economy, culture, and politics. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 337. Imperialism in Asia. 3 Hours.

Models of western inperialism will be contrasted woth those developed by Japan and China to develop a comparative study of political, cultural, and social developments in Japan, Indochina, Chinam and other Asian countries. Recent trends and relationships with the West will be emphasized. Prerequisite: HIST 102 or 104 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite: 101 or 102, or 103 or 104 or 211 or 211 or consent of instructor. NW/C2.

HIST 338. History of South Africa. 3 Hours.

South Africa is one of the most beautiful countries in the world, with fascinating historical developments. It is ethnically very diverse, combining African, European, and Asian populations. Today it is trying to forge a new identity as a recently democratic country. The course will examine cultural, political, social, and economic developments from precolonial times to the present. Some topics are: Zulu Wars, Cecil Rhodes' diamonds, the Great Trek, the Boer War, ANC, Apartheid, race relations, and the Truth and Reconciliation Committee. Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211 or 212, or consent of instructor. NW/T.

HIST 342. The Age Of The Vikings. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide an intensive look at the Scandinavian peoples of Europe in the central Middle Ages. Although traditional medieval history courses consider the Viking, Magyar, and Muslim invasions of the eighth and ninth centuries (beginning c. 750 CE), conventional courses tend to overlook the Scandinavian countries themselves and their culture. Thus, in this course we will examine Scandinavian origins in addition to their political, religious, and cultural backgrounds. This will require a look at the history of Scandinavia long before and after the traditional period of invasions. The greatest percentage of the readings, however, will focus on the period of Scandinavian expansion and invasion. Finally, we will consider the conversion of the Scandinavian peoples to Christianity and the assimilation of these peoples into the political order of Europe during the later medieval period. For this examination we will rely on primary source documents, archaeology, literary studies, and insights from other fields of research. (EU/C1).

HIST 343. The Medieval Church. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide an intensive look at the church and Christendom during the Middle Ages. Although students typically learn about the medieval church, medieval church structure, and medieval church figures in classes on the Middle Ages, conventional courses tend to focus on the political, social, and cultural aspects of the period. This course is therefore designed to provide a deeper look at the medieval church, including its beginnings in Roman Empire, its maturation in the high medieval period, and its eventual decline on the eve of the Reformation. In addition to examining the church itself, this course considers the various components of Christendom, including but not limited to the Church Fathers, monasticism, the papacy, the laity, interactions with princes and rulers, and the crusades. (EU/C1).

HIST 347. The Making of Modern Europe. 3 Hours.

A thematic study of Europe during the age of the industrial and social revolution, 1815-1945. This course compares major social and cultural trends across a variety of European nations. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU.

HIST 350. Europe in 20th Century. 3 Hours.

A detailed consideration of the main political, intellectual, social, and economic trends of 20th century Europe. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. EU/C2.

HIST 351. The Mediterranean World. 3 Hours.

Surveys the major classical civilizations of Greece and Rome from their inception to their decline. IN examining these larger civilizations, this course also takes into consideration smaller peripheral state (such as the Phonicians)located along the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, as well as the Arabic states (the Persians and the Sassanids) that were often in conflict with both the Greeks and the Romans. Although this class focuses on the classical period, it will also examine the developments of late antiquity (such as Christianity and Islam), which occurred in the former empires of the Greeks and Romans.

HIST 352. Medieval & Early Modern Women. 3 Hours.

Surveys medieval and early modern women. To conduct this survey it is first necessary to examine the ancestors of medieval women. This class thus begins by looking at Roman women and their 'barbarian' counterparts, the women of the frontier. We then turn to early medieval women, who were an amalgamation of Roman and 'barbarian' traditions. In the second half of the class we examine the many opportunities for women in the high and later Middle Ages and then finish by looking at restrictions placed on women during the periods of the Renaissance and Reformation.

HIST 363. Atlantic History. 3 Hours.

Globalization is not a recent phenmenon. As early as the 15th century, Africans, Americans, and Europeans exchanged ideas, goods, animals, plants, diseases, and people on an ever increasing scale. In this course we will study the various levels of interactions between Africans, Americans, and Europeans between about 1400 and 1800 on the four inhabited continents bordering the Atlantic Ocean. Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. T. C1.

HIST 365. Peoples & Cultures of Native North America. 3 Hours.

The course surveys the major culture areas of North America prior to contact with Europeans. In each region particular attention is given to one group or nation to highlight cultural adaptations and development. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 380. History Of Mexico. 3 Hours.

Mexico and the U.S. are entering into an ever closer relationship, but their histories are quite different. This survey outlines the Mexican past from pre-Colombian to modern times. We will focus on one area ( the Andes or Meso America) and study a wide variety of topics such as: conquest, colonialism, religion, gender, protests, and ecology. Prerequisite: one of the following HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212, or consent of instructor. NW/T.

HIST 385. History of Brazil. 3 Hours.

Brazil is more than carnaval alone, but that is a fundamental aspect of the largest South American society. In this course, we will examine Brazilian history and society from a wide variety of angles. The country is very diverse: from the Amazon rainforest where native peoples still live in isolation, to the Sao Paulo metropolitan area that can compete with any Western country as to modernity and industrial development. Brazil is a country full of contracts: optimistic but sad, dancing sambas but violent. In the course we will examine Brazil's past and how this confributed to the country's present social, ecinimic, political, and cultural situation. Prerequisite: one of the following HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. NW/T.

HIST 392. Experimental Course in History. 3 Hours.

This is an experimental course that may be taught department needs. The design of the course is to allow the instructor to test and assess content and methodology that may become a permanent part of a department's course listings. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102, 103, or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor.

HIST 394. Independent Study General Hist. 1-4 Hour.

HIST 399. Readings in History. 1-3 Hour.

Study and discussion of readings in history. Specific topic wil be arranged with the instructor. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

HIST 401. Historiography. 3 Hours.

A course to consider both the philosophy or theory of history as well as the mechanics of "doing" history. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester only.).

HIST 410. Trans-Mississippi West. 3 Hours.

An in-depth look at the impact of this region on the development and growth of America. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 415. 20th Century America. 3 Hours.

A seminar focusing on a particular theme or time period of 20th century America history. A specific focus will be selected each time the course is offered. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. T/C2.

HIST 420. Indian People of the Great Plains. 3 Hours.

Study of the culture and history of the Indian Peoples of the Great Plains. Prerequisites: HIST 103 and 104 or consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 430. Native American Social History. 3 Hours.

Seminar examining the different socail experiences of Native peoples in North America. Topics include, among others, historical demography, gender, intercultural relations with the U.S. Prerequisites: two of the following HIST 101, 102 or consent of instructor. NW/T.

HIST 434. History and Multimedia. 1-3 Hour.

This course is designed to teach students to transform the content of a traditional seminar paper into a variety of multimedia formats. It introduces students to current digital tools, explores design issues and organizational strategies, and considers how to design presentations for varied audiences such as museums, children and schools, internet users, portable device users, and senior populations. No technical background is required, although students will need to have completed a 300 or 400 level history research paper to use as the raw material for this course, or they must co-enroll in a 300 or 400 level history class that requires such a paper.

HIST 435. Latin American History Seminar. 3 Hours.

A seminar focusing on a particular aspect of the history of the Latin American societies. Topics for focus may vary from Amerinaian societies, gender, invironmental history, social-economic situation, and relations with the U.S. Prerequisites: two of the following HIST 101, 102 or consent of instructor. NW/T.

HIST 440. Comparative Slavery in the Americas. 3 Hours.

North and South America have different experiences with salvery. In this course we will compare and contract the African impact on both continents, especially in Brazil and the United States. Some topics that we will study are: the slave trades, runaway slave societies, the Haitian revolution, African religions, race relations, gender roles, families, and the meanings of freedom. Prerequisites: two of the following HIST 101, 102, SPAN 334 or consent of instructor. T/C1.

HIST 442. The Crusades. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the period of the ¿Crusades¿ from its inception in the late eleventh century, to its maturity in the twelfth and thirteenth century, and through its final demise in the later Middle Ages. The examination of the development of the idea of crusade throughout these periods proves crucial to understanding the Crusades themselves, as the idea of crusade changed dramatically during each period. In this course we will exam each of these periods carefully, taking into consideration the various developments in the idea of crusade. We will also consider the impact that the Crusades have had on modern events. (EU/C1).

HIST 460. Modern France and Francophone Society. 3 Hours.

An in-depth seminar on the major themes of modern French history from 1750 to the present. Prerequisites: HIST 101 and 102 or consent of instructor. EU/C2.

HIST 491. History Seminar. 3 Hours.

An advanced seminar in history with a major paper requirement. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

HIST 494. Independent Study Honors Hist. 1-8 Hour.

HIST 497. Internship. 1-6 Hour.

Placement in applied public history setting for practical experience. Course is offered an a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: HIST 280 and consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit.

HIST 499. Special Topics in History. 1-8 Hour.

This course is a flexible course that may be taught depending on student needs. The design of the course is to present the student an ooportunity to concentrate on various topics. Prerequisites may apply.

Faculty

Professors

Bethany Andreasen

Joseph Jastrzembski

Ernst Pijning

Daniel Ringrose
Division Chair

Jonathan Wagner
Professor Emeritus

Assistant professor

Tiffany Ziegler
History Coordinator

Lecturers

Amanda Biles

Christina Sunwall

Mark Timbrook