Division of Science

CHEM Courses

CHEM 110. Survey of Chemistry. 4 Hours.

An introductory course covering topics that concern students' everyday lives. This course is designed for liberal arts and general education students. The course consists of an introduction to the science and includes historical perspectives. The course is intended to present chemistry in its broad culture, social, and economic context. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

CHEM 110H. Honors Survey of Chemistry. 4 Hours.

An introductory course covering topics that concern students' everyday lives. This course is designed for liberal arts and general education students. The course consists of an introduction to the science and includes historical perspectives. The course is designed to present chemistry in its broad cultural, social, and economic context. Assignments will include investigation of specific topics and written descriptions of the findings. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Honors program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor.

CHEM 115. Introductory Chemistry. 4 Hours.

Presents knowledge of concepts of chemical principles in greater depth and with more mathematical applications than in CHEM 110. Includes studies of general inorganic principles. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

CHEM 115H. Honors Introductory Chemistry. 4 Hours.

This course introduces concepts in general, organic, and biochemistry. Topics likely to be covered include: measurement, atoms, molecules, elements, the periodic table, nuclear chemistry, compounds, bonds, molecular geometry, classes of organic compounds, gases, liquids, solutions, chemical reactions, solutions, acids, bases, and biochemical compounds. Assignments will include investigation of specific topics and written descriptions of the findings. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: Math 102 or 103. Prerequisite: Honors program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor.

CHEM 121. General Chemistry I. 5 Hours.

This course is the first of two-semester sequence primarily intended for students majoring in science and science-related fields. Topics likely to be covered in this semester include; matter, measurement, atoms, ions, molecules, reactions, chemical calculations, thermochemistry, bonding, molecular geometrym periodicity, and gases. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: MATH 103.

CHEM 121H. Honors General Chemistry I. 5 Hours.

This course is the first of a two-semester sequence primarily intended for students majoring in science and science-related fields. Topics likely to be covered in this semester include: matter, measurement, atoms ions, molecules, reactions, chemical calculations, thermochemistry, bonding, molecular geometry, periodicity. and gases. Note: CHEM 121 and 121L must be taken concurrently. Assignments will include investigations of specific topics and written descriptions of the findings. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: MATH 103. Prerequisite: Honors program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor.

CHEM 122. General Chemistry II. 5 Hours.

This course in the second of a two-semester sequence primarily intended for students majoring in science and science-related fields. Topics likely to be covered in this semester include: intermolecular forces, liquids, solids, kinetics, equilibria, acids, bases, solution chemistry, precipitation, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 121.

CHEM 122H. Honors General Chemistry II. 5 Hours.

This course is the second of a two-semester sequence primarily intended for students majoring in science and science-related fields. Topics likely to be covered in this semester include: intermolecular forces, liquids, solids, kinetics, equilibria, acids, bases, solutions chemistry, precipitation, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Assignments will include investigation of specific topics and written descriptions of the findings. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: MATH 103. Prerequisites: CHEM 121H/121HL, Honors program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor.

CHEM 127. Chemistry of the Environment. 4 Hours.

This course is unique in that it uses topics of concern/interest to facilitate the learning and understanding of the scientific concepts behind them. The course will use current environmental topics, such as our atmosphere, global warming, energy, the ozone layer and water quality, to bring forward important chemical concepts as naming, bonding, stoichiometry, energetics, pH and chemical reactions. The course will also bring an interdisciplinary flavor to the material, discussing such topics as the carbon cycle and biological contributions, how earth processes may affect the quality of our drinking water and the effect of acid rain on the earth (both in terms of the geology and the ecosystem).

CHEM 227. Principles of Environmental Chemistry. 4 Hours.

Designed to provide students with a basic introduction to Environmental Chemistry. The course will introduce students to the environmental pathways, toxicology, and organic and inorganic environmental contaminants. The students will also study various processes in the environment, including those in air, soil, and water. Depending on time, the students may also be introduced to the managment of hazardous chemicals. Prerequisite: Student must complete CHEM 127 before enrolling in this course.

CHEM 230. Quantitative Analysis. 5 Hours.

A course in quantitative chemistry including gravimetric and volumetric analysis, statistical treatment of data, and an introdution to some instrumental analysis. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 122.

CHEM 240. Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry. 5 Hours.

Theory of bonding and structure in organic molecules and their reactions. An emphasis on functional groups related to biological molecules. This course presents the minimum preparation for CHEM 480. Offered in the spring. Lecture, 4 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 122.

CHEM 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

CHEM 341. Organic Chemistry I. 5 Hours.

A study of different classes of organic functional groups, their nomenclature, reactions, and properties. An introduction to Infrared and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is included. Offered in the fall. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour. Prerequisite: CHEM 122.

CHEM 342. Organic Chemistry II. 5 Hours.

A continuation of CHEM 341. A study of the chemical and mechanistic properties of organic functional groups. Offered in the spring. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour. Prerequisite: CHEM 341.

CHEM 360. Principles of Physical Chemistry. 4 Hours.

This course in designed for students interested in chemical education at the secondary level. Topics include gas laws, thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics, quantum mechanicsm and spectroscopy. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 230 and MATH 107.

CHEM 380. Environmental Chemistry. 4 Hours.

The course examines the interaction of chemical substances with the environment. Emphasis is placed on water quality and air quality. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 230.

CHEM 420. Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Hours.

An advanced course in inorganic chemistry, including theories of covalent and ionic bonding, crystalline structure, coordinate covalent bonding, group theory, and coordination chemistry. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 122, MATH 165.

CHEM 422. Inorganic Synthesis. 1 Hour.

Applied techniques in inorganic synthesis and conpound characterization. Offered on demand. Laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 420.

CHEM 430. Instrumental Analysis. 5 Hours.

A survey of instrumental methods used for chemical analysis. These methods include molecular absorption, atomic absorption and emission, fluorescence and phosphorescencem infrared absorption chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 230.

CHEM 436. Methods of Analysis and QC of Medicinal Plant Products. 5 Hours.

A study of methods for chemical analysis and quality assurance/quality control of medicinal botanical products and their extracts. Methods studied will include spectroscopy, gas and liquid chromatography, and gravimetric analysis. Aspects of quality assurance, calibration, and method validation will also be discussed and applied. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 230. CHEM 430 recommended.

CHEM 440. Organic Spectroscopy. 3 Hours.

Indentification of organic molecules via spectroscopic methods. Methods studied include infrared, UV-visible, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 342.

CHEM 442. Medicinal Chemistry. 4 Hours.

This course is designed for students interested in medicinal applications of organic chemistry and for students interested in continuing their education in medicine, pharmacy, and other health related fields. The course offers the study of major classes of medicinal compounds presented in a broad historic and cultural perspective of the development of medicinal chemistry from the first attempt to synthesize quinine in the early XIX century to modern days' antibiotics. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours. Laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 342 and junior or senior status.

CHEM 461. Physical Chemistry I. 4 Hours.

This course is the first of a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physical chemistry for chemistry majors. Topics covered include thermodynamics and equilibrium. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 122, MATH 166, and PHYS 222.

CHEM 462. Physical Chemistry II. 4 Hours.

A continuation of CHEM 461. Topics include: quantum mechanics, molecular orbital theory, group theory, and spectroscopy. Offered alternate spring terms. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 461.

CHEM 480L. Biochemistry Laboratory. 2 Hours.

A course covering theory and laboratory experience with a variety of techniques used in biochemistry. Laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 230. Corequisite: CHEM 481.

CHEM 481. Biochemistry I. 3 Hours.

Study of major classes of biological compounds, synthesis of macromolecules, enzyme kinetics, intermediary metabolism, and control mechanisms. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and CHEM 240 or 342.

CHEM 482. Biochemistry II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of CHEM 481 with more in-depth studies of particular pathways; particular emphasis is placed on medicinal chemistry and on corresponding clinical applications associated with the various pathways. Lecture 3 hours; Pre-requisite CHEM 481.

CHEM 494. Directed Research in Chemistry. 1-6 Hour.

Students conduct research under the direction of a faculty mentor. The general topic and specific goals and activities are agreed upon by the student the mentor. The number of credits is proportional to the time committed to the research.

CHEM 497. Internship in Chemistry. 1-4 Hour.

A cooperative occupational training program in the field of chemistry or a related area. The course may be repeated in the same or different position. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval and student must be a Chemistry or Chemistry Education major. Student must be at Junior or Senior status.

CHEM 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

GEOL Courses

GEOL 101. Environmental Geology with Lab. 4 Hours.

Mankind's interaction with the earth. Major environmental problems facing citizens today including: water resources, energy and mineral resources, and geologic hazards. Local field trips. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 105. Physical Geology with lab. 4 Hours.

Earth as a physical body, its structure, composition, and the geologic processes acting on and within the earth. Designed especially for students with a specific interest in geology and for those students contemplating a major in sciences. Field trips. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 106. Historical Geology with lab. 4 Hours.

Earth through time, its origin, history, and the history and evolution of animal and plant life. Laboratory study of fossils, sedimentary rocks, and stratigraphic problems. Field trips. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 108. Earth and Planetary Science. 4 Hours.

An introduction to the physical geology of Earth and astronomy, focusing on our solar system. Earth's materials and structure; internal and surficial processes that work to shape Earth; the history of Earth. Introduction to astronomy, including Earth's Moon, the planets and minor bodies of our solar system, the Sun, and the universe beyond our solar system. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 127. Environmental Earth Systems. 4 Hours.

This course is an introduction to Earth Science with an emphasis on people's connections to environmental issues. Earth science is covered within an Earth systems framework with an emphasis on interactions, now the various Earth systems interact with one another. It also deals with how Earth interacts with people, including how Earth affects people (resources, hazards), and how people affect Earth in both positive and negative ways. An underlying concept in this course is stewardship: how people can live with Earth responsibly, working toward a sustainable future.

GEOL 210. Minerals & Rocks. 3 Hours.

Physical, chemical, structural, and optical properties of minerals; description and identification of common rock-forming and ore minerals; mineral associations and introduction to classification of common rock types. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 220. Introduction to GIS. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to theory and techniques of geographic information systems (GIS), which includes the discovery, management, analysis, and display of spatial data. GIS is a valuable tool in disciplines that deal with spatial data, including geography, history, field or environmental sciences, epidemiology, economics, and business. This course is equivalent to GEOG 289. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 240. Geology of North Dakota. 3 Hours.

Geology of North Dakota for including historical geology of North Dakota and surrounding areas; Precambrian basement rocks; Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks; glacial geology; relationships between geology and physical geography (landforms); and existing and potential economic resources of North Dakota. Weekend field trip(s) required. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 260. Energy Resources. 3 Hours.

A survey of energy resources including fossil fuels, renewable, nuclear and unconventional sources. Includes origins, extraction, geography (major reserves, producers, and consumers), uses, and environmental implications. Field trips. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 290. Regional Geology. 3 Hours.

A study of the geology of a particular region in the United States or abroad. Class time involves introduction to the geology and preparation for a field trip to the region. Field trip is typically 10-14 days long and involves hiking and camping. Special fees required. May be repeated for credit. Lecture, 2 hours; field trip required. Prerequisite: GEOL 101 or GEOL 105 or consent of instructor.

GEOL 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

GEOL 300. Geologic Field Methods. 3 Hours.

Geologic mapping and sampling techniques. Students use basic mapping instruments, gather data and record it while in the field, and construct complete and accurate geologic maps, cross sections, and stratigraphic columns. Field trip(s) required. Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 4 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 106 and GEOL 210, or consent of instructor.

GEOL 305. Methods in Mineral and Petrology. 2 Hours.

Application of modern laboratory methods to the study of minerals and rocks. Methods include optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), analysis of bulk materials by ICP-AES and/or XRD, and SEM-EDS microanalysis of minerals. Students apply these methods while working on a research-based petrologic project. Laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 310. Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology. 3 Hours.

Description and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks based on mineralogy, textures, and chemical compositions; study of the origins of rocks through laboratory investigation of suites of related rocks. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 305.

GEOL 311. Paleontology. 4 Hours.

Fossilization, classification, evolution, and paleoecology. Geologic history and identification of major invertebrate phyla. Laboratory emphasizes fossils identification. Offered alternate falls. Field trip. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 4 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 106 or BIOL 151.

GEOL 320. Oceanography. 3 Hours.

Nature, origin, and evolution of ocean basins and sea water. Sea water chemistry, movement, and ability to support life. Life forms. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 321. Hydrogeology. 3 Hours.

Surface water hydrology; runoff and stream flow; groundwater hydrogeology: distribution of groundwater, aquifer properties, local and regional groundwater flow, geology of groundwater occurrence; groundwater resource development and management; water law. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 322. Geomorphology. 4 Hours.

Processes that shape Earth's surface. Effects of rock type, geologic structures, and climate on the formation and evolution of landforms. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 323. Global Climate Change. 3 Hours.

Examination of physical, chemical and biological processes that cause environments to change naturally or under the influence of human activities. Consideration of small watersheds, large lake systems and global atmospheric-ocean systems including meteorological processes. Emphasis on positive and negative feedback in controlling environments and their susceptibility to change. Prerequisite: GEOL 101 or GEOL 105 or GEOL 108.

GEOL 331. Soils. 4 Hours.

Principles of soils including formation, properties, and classification. This course includes the use of soils information in environmental applications. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 340. Chemistry of Natural Waters. 4 Hours.

Principles of aqueous chemistry, interactions between water and geologic materials, and the chemical nature of various natural waters; includes both fresh and saline waters found in both surface water environments (streams, lakes, oceans) and subsurface environments (vadose zone and saturated zones). Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: CHEM 121.

GEOL 361. Structural Geology. 4 Hours.

Stress, strain, mechanical behavior of rocks; description and interpretation of folds, faults, joints, and foliation; tectonic processes; interpretation of geologic maps and field data. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 4 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 390. Regional Field Geology. 3 Hours.

Application of geologic field methods to a particular area or areas. Field work focuses on rock unit descriptions, stratigraphic section measurement, and geologic mapping in areas of moderately complex geology. One hour of lecture per week is used to prepare for field work. The field work requires a 15-day trip. Prerequisite: GEOL 300.

GEOL 394. Independent Study General Es. 1-4 Hour.

GEOL 411. Field Geology. 6 Hours.

The methods of geology, including the preparation of stratigraphic columns, cross sections and geologic maps integrated with paleoenvironmental interpretation and structural history. Students must write professional level reports. Offered in summer. Prerequisites: GEOL 361, GEOL 471, and consent of instructor.

GEOL 421. Applied Hydrogeology. 3 Hours.

Mass transport in vadose and saturated zones; origin and behavior of inorganic and organic contaminants; investigative techniques; groundwater models; site remediation. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 321.

GEOL 471. Sedimentation and Stratigraphy. 4 Hours.

Origins, characteristics, and classification of sedimentary rocks. Techniques of study, interpretation of data, lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, and correlation. Field trip required. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 106 and GEOL 210.

GEOL 494. Directed Research in Geology. 1-2 Hour.

Students conduct research under direction of a faculty mentor. The topic and goals are agreed to by student and mentor in writing at the beginning of the research. A requirement for successful completion of a second credit of GEOL 494 on a project is that the student will submit an acceptable draft of a research paper that includes introduction/background, methods, and results. Repeatable for credit.

GEOL 497. Co-Op Practicum. 4-8 Hour.

GEOL 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

PHYS Courses

PHYS 105. Physical Science by Inquiry. 4 Hours.

In this course students will be involved in an in-depth inquiry based exploration of basic principles of physical science which are often taught in elementary school. It covers topics of properties of matter, light and color, electric circuits, and kinematics. Inquiry based units are supplemented with material on the history of scientific development.

PHYS 110. Astronomy. 4 Hours.

A study of the universe that begins with the earth as a planet, the planets and the satellities of our solar system, and moves out through stellar astronomy to galaxies and into the very fabric of the universe. It includes an evaluation of the methods and techniques of astronomy. Offered fall semester. Both day and night laboratories. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

PHYS 110H. Honors Astronomy. 4 Hours.

A study of the universe that begins with the earth as a planet, the planets and the satellites of our solar system, and moves out through stellar astronomy to galaxies and into the very fabric of the universe. Evaluation of the methods and techniques of astronomy. Explicit training in use of the full spectrum of the MSU observatory equipment. Offered fall semester. Both day and night laboratories. Lecutre, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Honors program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of instructor.

PHYS 211. College Physics I. 4 Hours.

Elementary laws and principles of mechanics and fluids. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Prerequisite: MATH 103.

PHYS 212. College Physics II. 4 Hours.

Elementary laws of electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 203.

PHYS 221H. Honors General Physics I. 5 Hours.

Newton's Laws; work and energy; impulse and momentum; angular mementum; oscillations; gravity; wave motionl; thermodynamics. Emphasis on sophisticated quantitative reasoning, order of magnitude estimation, in-depth application of calculation, and physical underpinnings of other sciences and technology. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Prerequisite: MATH 165 and admission to the honors program or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of instructor.

PHYS 222H. Honors General Physics II. 5 Hours.

Electricity; Gauss' laws and potential difference; magnetism; Maxwell's equations; optics; introduction to modern physics. Emphasis on sophisticated quantitative reasoning, order of magnitude estimation, in-depth application of calculus, and physical inderpinnings of other sciences and technology. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Corequisite: MATH 166 Prequisite: Honors program admission.

PHYS 251. University Physics I. 5 Hours.

Newton's law's; work and energy; impluse and momentum; angular momentum; oscillations; gravity; wave motion; thermodynamics. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Corequisite: MATH 165.

PHYS 252. University Physics II. 5 Hours.

Electricity; Gauss' laws and potential difference; magnetism; MAxwell's equations; optics; introduction to Modern Physics. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 221. Corequisite: MATH 166.

PHYS 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

PHYS 394. Independent Study General Phys. 1-4 Hour.

PHYS 494. Independent Study Honors Phys. 1-8 Hour.

PHYS 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

SCI Courses

SCI 95. Interconnecting Perspectives in Science. 0 Hours.

Science 095 examines how to present important scientific concepts to students from a diversity of backgrounds including different cultures, different learning styles, different ages, different genders, different physical abilities and different intellectual abilities.

SCI 120. Plant Products Seminar 1. 1 Hour.

Introduction to the botanical plant products industry. Topics include an introduction to the field, laws and regulations, technology and methods, career opportunities and ethics. Students will participate in reviews of relevant literature, group discussions, guest lectures from industry leaders, and/or field trips. Lecture, 1 hour.

SCI 220. Plant Products Seminar 2. 1 Hour.

A continuation of SCI 120, looking more deeply into various aspects of the botanical plant products industry. Students will participate in reviews of relevant literature, group discussion, guest lectures from industry leaders, and/or field trips. Lecture, 1 hour. Prerequisite: SCI 120.

SCI 240. Research Methods. 2 Hours.

This course will introduce students to library skills, computer skills and comminication skills used to plan and carry out research projects. Studentd will search for, read, adn discuss journal articles; write and edit project proposals; and learn basic data management and analysis skills. Prerequisite: sophomore, junior, or senior status.

SCI 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

SCI 301. Biogeochemical Cycles. 3 Hours.

A broad overview of global biogeochemical process, including the origin of elements, Earth evolution, evolution of biogeochemical cycles, biogeochemical cycles of major elements such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur, cycles of select trace elements, interactions of biogeochemical cycles, biogeochemistry of various ecosystems, and environmental biogeochemistry. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Student must take BIOL 127, CHEM 127, or GEOL 127 before enrolling in this course.

SCI 391. Teaching Science in Secondary Schools. 3 Hours.

Study of science teaching in middle school and high school grades with emphasis on clinical experience. Basic techniques for all disciplines are individualized in practice. Emphasis on teaching an investigative approach to science. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

SCI 394. Independent Study General Sci. 1-4 Hour.

SCI 426. Elementary Science Methods. 4 Hours.

Study of basic concepts of science within a framework of elementary school teaching methodology. Interpretation of science content, learning theory, curriculum approaches, instructional strategies, and lesson planning are emphasized. Includes entensive clinical experience. Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320. Corequisites: ED 320, 421, 422, 423, 424.

SCI 480. Seminar. 3 Hours.

Students present and discuss original student research project in both written and oral forms. To enroll, students must have completed their research and must have written the Introduction, Methods, and Results components of the research paper. Time in this course is also dedicated to a review of fundamental aspects of the discipline of their major and successful completion of a comprehensive exam. Prerequisites: senior status; and 2 credits of CHEM 494 or GEOL 494, or permission of instructors.

SCI 494. Independent Study Honors Sci. 1-8 Hour.

SCI 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Faculty

Chemistry Faculty

Robert Crackel
Program Coordinator

Mikhail Bobylev

Christopher Heth

Bryan Schmidt

Naomi Winburn

Geosciences Faculty

John Webster
Program Coordinator

Joseph Collette

Kathryn Kilroy

Physics Faculty

Draza Markovic
Program Coordinator

Radiologic Technology Faculty

Robert Crackel
Program Coordinator

Science Education Faculty

Dannah Schaffer
Program Coordinator