Division of Art, Broadcasting and Professional Communication

ART Courses

ART 91. Visual Arts Seminar V. 0 Hours.

A continuation of VA seminar. Restricted to art majors and minors. Mandatory for all art majors after completion of ART 491.

ART 95. Art Experience. 0 Hours.

Students will assist and contribute to an art experience. The course experience will require student to facilitate and support the production of art by working with guest artists and/or contributing art to an event.

ART 101. Introduction to Studio Art. 3 Hours.

An introductory studio art course to familiarize the non-art major with the basic painting, printmaking, sculptural, jewelry, and ceramic processes. Six studio hours per week.

ART 110. Introduction to Visual Arts. 3 Hours.

Study and appreciation of visual arts. Three hour lecture.

ART 112. Print, Web, and Social Media Graphics. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to forms and techniques of social media graphics. Students will explore stylistic elements that are documented in current trends and established methods of design. Students will learn to craft and analyze a variety of inventive texts for traditional and non-traditional forms of print, web and social media.

ART 122. Two-Dimensional Design. 3 Hours.

A basic course in the study of two-dimensional design for the studio artist. Six studio hours per week.

ART 124. Three-Dimensional Design. 3 Hours.

A basic course in the study of three-dimensional design for the studio artist. Six studio hours per week.

ART 130. Drawing I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic drawing techniques through a variety of materials. Six studio hours per week.

ART 140. Arts & Crafts. 3 Hours.

Instruction including, but not limited to, basic techniques in fibers, glass and metal processes. Six studio hours per week.

ART 180. Digital Photography. 3 Hours.

Introduction to digital photography. Digital SLR camera and tripod required. Six studio hours per week.

ART 191. Visual Arts Seminar I. 0.5-1 Hour.

Introduction of departmental requirements, procedures and opportunities. Fall and Spring semesters required for all art majors. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors.

ART 201. Art Methods for Elementary Education. 3 Hours.

Methods of teaching art in elementary education. Six studio hours per week.

ART 204. Jewelry and Small Sculpture. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic jewelry and small sculpture techniques, design, and materials. Six studio hours per week.

ART 207. Digital Tools: Imaging & Print. 3 Hours.

An exploration of Adobe's Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Covers software programs and peripherals designed for imaging and print, building basic skills and knowledge of computer programs. Prerequisite(s): ART 112.

ART 210. Art History I. 3 Hours.

A survey of western art from Paleolithic to Renaissance.

ART 211. Art History II. 3 Hours.

A survey of western art from Renaissance to present.

ART 212. Non-Western Art History. 3 Hours.

An integrated survey of the art of non-western cultures.

ART 213. Graphic Design I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the elements and practice of typography with emphasis on typefaces and letterforms in graphic design. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 112, ART 207, ART 122, ART 123, and 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 214. Graphic Design II. 3 Hours.

Application of problem solving skills for visual communications as applied to the history of graphic design. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 213 or consent of instructor.

ART 220. Painting I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic painting through a variety of materials. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART, 122, ART 123 and ART 130.

ART 225. Water Media I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic watermedia painting for the studio artist. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, ART 123 and ART 130, or consent of instructor.

ART 231. Figure Drawing I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic figure drawing with a live model. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122 and ART 130, or consent of instructor.

ART 250. Ceramics I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic ceramic techniques. Six studio hours per week.

ART 265. Sculpture I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic sculpture materials and techniques. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, ART 123, and ART 124, or consent of instructor.

ART 266. Sculpture II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 265. Four studio hours per week. Emphasis on independent development of technique and style. Prerequisite: ART 265 or consent of instructor.

ART 270. Printmaking I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic printmaking techniques and materials: relief, monotype, and screen printing. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 122, ART 123 and 130.

ART 271. Printmaking II. 3 Hours.

Basic exploration in intaglio and lithography printing techniques. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 122, 123, and 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 274. Paper Works. 3 Hours.

Introduction to works on or of paper including book arts, papermaking, and letterpress printing. Six studio credits per week. Prerequisites: ART 122 and 123 or instructor consent.

ART 280. Traditional Photography. 3 Hours.

Introduction to traditional photography. SLR film camera and tripod required. Six studio hours per week.

ART 291. Visual Arts Seminar II. 0.5-1 Hour.

A continuation of VA Seminar, including second year portfolio reviews. Fall and Spring semesters required for all Art majors. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors. Prerequisite: ART 191 or consent of instructor.

ART 296. Study Tour. 1-3 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit.

ART 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ART 310. Modernism. 3 Hours.

A survey of Modernism in Art.

ART 311. Postmodernism. 3 Hours.

A survey of Postmodernism in art.

ART 312. History of Architecture. 3 Hours.

A survey of architectural history from prehistory to the present.

ART 313. Women in the Visual Arts. 3 Hours.

A study of the impact of women in the visual arts throughout history.

ART 314. Art History Topics. 3 Hours.

A survey of a discipline's history from prehistory to the present. Topics are variable. Prerequisite: ART 210 and ART 211 or consent of instructor.

ART 315. Native American Art. 3 Hours.

Art and crafts of the indigenous people of the America's (North and South) through a study of their artifacts and history from pre-history to the present.

ART 322. Graphic Design III. 3 Hours.

An advanced exploration of graphic design in the contemporary digital environment, culminating in the execution of a professional portfolio. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 214.

ART 323. Illustration Techniques. 3 Hours.

Introduction to materials, techniques, and problem solving skills used in illustration. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, ART 123, and ART 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 325. Water Media II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 225 with renewed emphasis on development of an individualized technique, style, and concept through acrylic as well as transparent watercolor. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 123 and 225.

ART 331. Advanced Drawing. 3 Hours.

Advanced problems in drawing including still-life, figure drawing and contemporary style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 231 or consent of instructor.

ART 332. Figure Drawing II. 3 Hours.

Advanced problems in figure drawing with a live model. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 231 or consent of instructor.

ART 333. Painting II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 220 with emphasis on independent development of technique, composition, and style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 220 or consent of instructor.

ART 334. Painting III. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 333. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 333 or consent of instructor.

ART 345. Introduction to Museum Studies. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the history, key debates, and contemporary practices of museums and galleries with a focus on exhibit design, education, conservation and collection management.

ART 351. Ceramics II. 3 Hours.

Advanced development of the individual ceramist-teacher in studio experience related to clay bodies, glazes, and firing procedures. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 250 or consent of instructor. Entry level specialization and 100 level core foundations.

ART 352. Ceramics III. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 351. Six studio hours per week. Emphasis on independent development of the techniques and style. Prerequisite: ART 250 and 351.

ART 362. Printmaking III. 3 Hours.

Continuation of 270 and 361 with emphasis on independent development of technique, composition, and style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 270 or 361 or consent of instructor. Entry level specialization and 100 level core foundations.

ART 380. Advanced Photography. 3 Hours.

Advanced exploration of photography with emphasis on independent development of technique, composition and style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ART 281 or ART 382.

ART 382. Alternative Photography. 3 Hours.

Course will encourage exploration and production in photographic techniques not studied in beginning photography courses, including alternative printing techniques. Repeatable to six credits. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 180 or consent of instructor.

ART 390. Art Methods. 4 Hours.

Discussion and interactive experiences developing a K-12 art curriculum. Peer teaching and classroom management, organizational techniques, and practicum. Prerequisites: ART 122, 130, 140, 201 and admitted into teacher education.

ART 391. Visual Arts Seminar III. 0.5-1 Hour.

A continuation of VA seminar, including a junior group exhibition. Fall and Spring semesters required for Art majors. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors. Prerequisite: ART 291 or consent of instructor.

ART 420. Advanced Study in Art History. 1-6 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent research in art history. A preliminary outline of proposed research is required. This course is restricted to art majors or minors. Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

ART 422. Advanced Digital Design. 3 Hours.

An advanced study of contemporary software and theory used in digital communication. Prerequisites: ART 112 and ART 207 or consent of instructor.

ART 491. Visual Arts Seminar IV. 0.5-1 Hour.

A continuation of VA seminar. Fall and Spring semesters required. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors. Prerequisite: ART 391 or consent of instructor.

ART 492. Capstone Experience. 1.5 Hour.

Provides for individual research culminating in a capstone exhibition, portfolio, paper or project with guidance from a capstone committee. Prerequisite: ART 391 or consent of instructor. Co-requisite: ART 491 or consent of instructor. Student must be at junior or senior status before enrolling. This course gathers a student cohort in the Fall semester (1.5 credits) and continues in the Spring semester in ART 493 (1.5 credits) with a culminating experience. The Capstone Experience requirement is ART 492 and ART 493 combining for 3 credit hours.

ART 493. Capstone Experience. 1.5 Hour.

Provides for individual research culminating in a capstone exhibition, portfolio, paper or project with guidance from a capstone committee. Prerequisite: ART 391 or consent of instructor. Co-requisite: ART 491 or consent of instructor. Student must be at junior or senior status before enrolling. This course advances a student cohort from the Fall semester (ART 492, 1.5 credits) and finishes in the Spring semester (ART 493,1.5 credits) with a culminating experience. The Capstone Experience requirement is ART 492 and ART 493 combining for 3 credit hours.

ART 494. Directed Research in the Studio Arts. 1-4 Hour.

This course provides flexible instruction in studio experiences at an advanced level. Consent of instructor. Variable credit 1-4.

ART 496. Study Tour. 0-6 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. The course requirements will include additional requirements beyond the travel itself and may be repeated for credit.

ART 497. Art Internship. 1-12 Hour.

This course is offered for variable credit. It is an internship to gain further experience in student's selected option. Restricted to art majors and minors.

ART 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

COMM Courses

COMM 100. Recitals. 0.5 Hours.

This course is required for all Broadcasting and Professional Communication majors and offers a variety of professional development opportunities.

COMM 110. Fundamentals of Public Speaking. 3 Hours.

The theory and practice of public speaking with emphasis on topic selection, content, organization of material, language, methods of securing attention and maintaining interest, delivery and critical evaluation of informative and persuasive messages. May not be used as part of communication arts major, minor, of concentration.

COMM 120. Introduction to Broadcasting. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the history of television and radio broadcasting. Students will explore how the broadcasting industry is undergirded and shaped by a variety of factors, including economics, operations, and emerging media technologies. The course also examines current laws and regulations of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and other governing organizations.

COMM 191. Freshman Seminar. 1 Hour.

Introduction to departmental requirements and opportunities. Pre-requisite: Communication major or minor.

COMM 210. Advanced Public Speaking. 3 Hours.

An advanced course in the art of oral discourse. Emphasis is placed on professional presentations, adapting to diverse audiences, logic, persuasion, and rhetorical analysis. Prerequisite: COMM 110 or consent of instructor.

COMM 211. Communication & Popular Culture. 3 Hours.

Includes analysis of audience, occasion, subject, and speaker. Subject matter will include such media as movies, songs, television, humor, fashion, public demonstration, advertisements, architecture, etc. Includes text readings, group discussion, analytical essays, and a critical paper and presentation.

COMM 212. Interpersonal Communication. 3 Hours.

Introduces fundamental concepts of communication between individuals. Exploring aspects of self expression, relationship communication-how people present themselves, and how others perceive them in return.

COMM 218. Public Relations Principles. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of public relations. Students learn about the history and growth of PR, as well as the role of PR as a management function. Topics of study include research and planning, campaign implementation, new and social media, professional ethics, and more. Course projects and assignments allow students to build experience in professional speaking and writing as it applies to the field of public relations.

COMM 219. Mass Media and Society. 3 Hours.

Basic communication theory and its application to mass communication with emphasis on social, cultural, and political implication of the media.

COMM 220. Broadcast Advertising & Applications. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to chief principles and theories of advertising, with emphasis on published examples of print and electronic advertisements. Students learn documented factors that increase the power of advertising through mass media, and they apply this knowledge to a variety of assignments to ultimately understand, critique, and create advertisements for both products and services. Restricted to sophomore, junior, and senior status.

COMM 221. PR & Media Writing. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic writing skills in the field of public relations & the media. This is a writing intensive course that teaches students how to prepare professional public relations messages for print and electronic media. Specifically, students will learn to compose news releases, fact sheets, media advisories, internal communications information, and more.

COMM 224. Social Media, Writing, and Design. 3 Hours.

Learn techniques used to capture readers' attention in online and print media while combining images and text to tell the story.

COMM 225. Audio Production I. 3 Hours.

Laboratory and lecture course with emphasis on the principles and techniques of radio production and programming.

COMM 244. Reporting and Feature Writing. 3 Hours.

Introduction to news gathering, judgment, writing, history, conventions, and style of the news story, the newspaper feature story, and the magazine article.

COMM 281. Reporting & Editing. 1 Hour.

Laboratory course in which class members work on the campus paper and attend staff meetings. Repeatable up to eight credits.

COMM 283. TV Activities. 1 Hour.

An opportunity for students to work on various projects that they will produce for on and off campus. Repeatable up to eight credits.

COMM 284. Radio Activities. 1 Hour.

An opportunity for students to work on various audio projects that they will produce for on and off campus groups. Repeatable up to eight credits.

COMM 285. Broadcasting and Professional Communication Activities. 2 Hours.

This course provides hands-on training for technological tools of broadcasting and professional communication, including TV and radio production, public relations, social media, and communication.

COMM 286. Promotions Activities. 1 Hour.

The course provides students with an understanding of how to strategically plan promotions. Students are able to engage in real life events activities such as planning, marketing, advertising, production, writing, and more. Students are taught time management alongside promotions. This course specifically directs students to have hands on experience within the Broadcasting Department. More directly, writing newsletters, promotions of channel 19, alumni relations, web site writing & creation, and advertising.

COMM 291. Sophomore Seminar. 1 Hour.

Study of communication (people, events, activities) as determined by student/professor consultation. Pre-requisite: Communication major or minor.

COMM 297. Internship. 1-2 Hour.

Hands-on experience in the discipline. Restricted to Communication majors or minor or consent of instructor.

COMM 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

COMM 310. Social Media Strategy and Measurement. 3 Hours.

Students will learn how to strategically plan and implement social media communication for different organizations (for-profit, non-profit) with different audiences and goals, and these efforts will be guided by established research and industry trends. The class will complete a variety of projects that use different forms of communication (videography, photography, graphic design, writing) that span multiple platforms. Students will learn how to measure social media communication using quantitative and qualitative research methods, and they will explore how this data can be used to guide current and future efforts.

COMM 311. Oral Interpretation. 3 Hours.

The study of literature for performance with emphasis on written and verbal analysis. The technique of performance applied to oral reading of literature.

COMM 312. Travel Writing. 3 Hours.

Travel writing comes in many forms and styles. This course combines a survey of travel writing with instruction and practice in travel writing. Students will seek out their own travel experience during the semester the course is taken and return to the classroom to write about that experience.

COMM 315. Persuasion & Argumentation. 3 Hours.

An investigation of the structure, types, and tests of persuasive arguments with practical application through rhetorical analysis and speeches. Prerequisite: COMM 110 or consent of instructor.

COMM 316. Group Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Study of techniques of group discussion and small group theory with emphasis on participating in various types of discussion and conferences.

COMM 317. Rhetorical Theory. 3 Hours.

A study of the development of rhetorical standards and practices from ancient time to the present.

COMM 318. Organizational Communication. 3 Hours.

The course is a study of communication practices in organizations by examining organizational structure, leadership, teambuilding, and ethics. The course will include communication areas such as diversity, conflict, stress, and technology.

COMM 322. Media Sales and Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course explores media sales and analysis within a variety of mediums, including television, radio, newspapers, magazines, online and social media, interactive, and outdoor communication channels. Students will use theory and research to guide their course projects and assignments. Cumulatively, these efforts allow students to build both knowledge and skills that are critical to successful media sales and analysis.

COMM 323. Journalism History. 3 Hours.

Examination of the news gathering function of the mass media with special emphasis on press theory and the development of thought of freedom of expression.

COMM 324. Community Relations. 3 Hours.

This course examines current communication strategies used by public relations practitioners to establish and maintain relationships with different communities. Students apply their knowledge from course readings to complete a variety of applied assignments and at least one community-based project. Topics of study include resource management, social networking, traditional and new media, problem-solving, and more.

COMM 325. Campaigns and Strategies. 3 Hours.

This course explores the integral relationship between public relations, marketing, and advertising in today's market. The textbook, classroom lectures, guest speakers, and assignments help students build a solid foundation in the fundamentals needed to plan, implement, and evaluate public relations campaigns. Prerequisites: COMM 218 and junior or senior status.

COMM 326. Media Announcing. 3 Hours.

Theories, practices, and techniques of "on-air" presentation will be the focus of this course. Students will develop the skills necessary to perform a variety of media announcing tasks. Students will study the techniques and styles required to perform as media newscaster, interviewers, program hosts, commercial and public service announcers. Prerequisite: COMM 120 or consent of instructor.

COMM 328. Play by Play Communication. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the theory and practice of electronic media sports coverage, with an emphasis on the role, skills and practice of radio and TV sports announcers and electronic sports media journalism. The class includes play-by-play broadcasts and a class project.

COMM 329. Sports Television Production. 3 Hours.

Professional sports media at an advanced level. Special topics in areas such as sports media production, announcing, performance and sports feature. The course will emphasize other performance situations, such as producing and anchoring radio and television sportscasts. After completing this course, students will be able to develop, write, pre-produce, produce, perform as talent and post-produce programming for broadcast sports media.

COMM 344. Investigative Reporting. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the subject matter, techniques, and ethics of investigative reporting. It will include such topics as secondary sources, primary documents, people sources, computer-assisted reporting, writing projects, accuracy, and ethics. Prerequisite: COMM 244.

COMM 354. Special Events Planning. 3 Hours.

The course will introduce students to special events processes and techniques. Students will become knowledgeable about model workplace skills, leadership development, promotions, media relations, and production associated with an event. Additional topics of study include site selection, program planning, and material development.

COMM 360. Video Production I. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on the operation of video, audio, and editing equipment. Prerequisite: COMM 120.

COMM 361. Broadcast News Writing. 3 Hours.

Intensive survey and application of gathering, writing, and presenting.

COMM 362. Broadcast News Gathering. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the practical knowledge of basic electronic news gathering production techniques, as well as to learn to operate equipment associated with ENG. Students will learn the correct terminology and the basic formats of ENG. Prerequisite: COMM 360.

COMM 388. Communication for Educators. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students pursuing an education or related degree. It will include the study of various communication opportunities faced by person in a profession educational setting.

COMM 389. Directing Forensics. 2 Hours.

Theory, philosophy, and practice in speech contest/festival design and of coaching individual forensic events and debate. Designed for the teacher who will be asked to coach speech on the secondary level. May be taken at the same time as student teaching.

COMM 390. Communication Arts Methods. 4 Hours.

Methods and materials for creative teaching of speaking, listening, and theatre and broadcast activities, in today's secondary school environment. Prerequisite: Admittance to Teacher Education.

COMM 394. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of communication. Prerequisite: Communication major or minor.

COMM 395. Service Learning. 3 Hours.

Students will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate (a) personal community or global service experience(s). Pre-requisite: Communication major or minor.

COMM 397. Communication Arts Practicum. 1-3 Hour.

Student Internship with application of specialized speech techniques in broadcasting, theatre, or other areas of communication arts.

COMM 408. Social and Pragmatic Communication Disorders. 3 Hours.

Social and pragmatic communication disorders are becoming more and more prevalent in the practice of speech-language pathology and audiology; especially as mental health issues are becoming more prevalent. This course will provide needed content in order for students and professionals to effectively assess and intervene for people with social and pragmatic communication disorders.

COMM 410. Advanced Problems. 3 Hours.

Courses beyond the present offerings on broadcasting, speech communication, and theatre arts. No more than three courses may be accrued.

COMM 412. Communication Law and Ethics. 3 Hours.

A study of the regulatory policies (federal, state, and municipal), history of free speech, the responsibility of the media, the responsibility of the individual as sender and receiver of messages, and ethical decision making in modern electronic and print media. The course will focus on current communications issues in social and workplace settings.

COMM 413. Gender Communication. 3 Hours.

Course designed to explore the theories surrounding differences and similarities in male and female communication. Focus on ways in which gender roles originated and are sustained in a variety of context including families, organizations, institutions, peer groups, the media, and interpersonal relationships. Prerequisites: COMM 110 and junior or senior status.

COMM 425. Crisis Communication. 3 Hours.

This course provides both a theoretical and applied approach to proactive crisis communication. Students learn how to engage in effective communication before, during, and after a crisis in a manner that benefits both the public and the organization at hand. Students also explore how management decisions impact crisis communication and how PR practitioners can support managerial decisions. Throughout the course students complete case studies, participate in mock crisis situations, and learn how to compose, utilize, and evaluate crisis management plans. Prerequisite(s): COMM 218.

COMM 454. Advanced Special Events Planning. 3 Hours.

The course will introduce students to advanced special events processes and techniques. Students will become knowledgeable about model workplace skills, leadership development, promotions, media relations, and production associated with an event. Additional topics of study include site selection, program planning, and material development.

COMM 460. Advanced TV and Social Media Production. 3 Hours.

Use of TV video, audio, and editing equipment in various news and commercial applications. Prerequisite: COMM 360.

COMM 475. Broadcast Production. 1-3 Hour.

The operations, techniques, and practices of broadcast production. Activities include originating, acquiring, organizing, and assembling news segments into a complete television program. Can be repeated for up to eight credits. Prerequisite: COMM 360.

COMM 492. Senior Portfolio. 1-3 Hour.

In this course, students will present their final portfolios prior to graduation. The portfolio will be compiled throughout the student's academic career and include professional quality elements for the student to market him-/herself to potential employers. Portfolios may include coursework and/or work from an internship. Prerequisite: COMM 099.

COMM 497. Broadcast Practicum. 4 Hours.

Internship in the mass communication field allowing the students to put into practice, in a professional setting, those techniques and theories learned in their coursework. Prerequisites: Completion of 40 credits in communications with a 2.75 GPA in major.

COMM 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Faculty

Art

Bill Harbort
Chair

Katy Allers
Administrative Assistant

Micah Bloom

Linda Olson

Ryan Stander
Program Coordinator

Greg Vettel
Northwest Art Center Director

Broadcasting and Professional Communication

Bill Harbort
Chair

Katy Allers
Administrative Assistant

Alison McAfee

Dr. Christina Paxman

Neil Roberts