2017-18 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs

Course Descriptions

ARB Courses

ARB 101. Beginning Arabic I. 4 Hours.

For beginners or those entering with one or two years of high school Arabic. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture.

ARB 102. Beginning Arabic II. 4 Hours.

A continuation of Beginning Arabic I. Prerequisite(s): Arabic 101.

ARB 201. Intermediate Arabic I. 4 Hours.

Review of basic Arabic with increased practice in conversation, reading and writing. Prequisite(s): Arabic 102, three years of high school Arabic or consent of instructor.

ARB 202. Intermediate Arabic II. 4 Hours.

Continuation of Arabic 201. Prerequisite(s): Arabic 201.

ARB 220. Arabic Film. 3 Hours.

An exploration of socio-cultural, historical, and political issues in non-mainstream Arab cinema. Supplementary readings in English translation. Films projected in Arabic, with English subtitles. Taught in English.

ARB 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or on time offerings of current topics.

ARB 340. Conversation & Composition I. 3 Hours.

Advanced practice in oral and written skills using cultural reading and other media. Prerequisite(s): ARB 202 or consent of instructor.

ARB 341. Conversation & Composition II. 3 Hours.

Advanced practice in oral skills using cultural reading and other media. Prerequisite(s): ARB 202 or consent of instructor.

ARB 342. Intro to Arabic Literature. 3 Hours.

Designed to improve language skills with an emphasis on reading and enhance the students' ability to understand Arabic literature. Includes study of poetry, drama, and narrative form Arabic speaking countries. Prerequisite(s): ARB 302.

ARB 343. Arabic Culture. 3 Hours.

Readings in culture and society of the Arab world.

ARB 394. Independent Studies. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of speical topics in the study of Arabic. Arabic majors or minors only. Prerequisite(s): ARB 342.

ARB 402. Genres. 3 Hours.

Study of a major genre or period in Arabic Literature. Topic varies from year to year. Prerequisite(s): ARB 343.

ARB 450. Senior Capstone in Arabic. 3 Hours.

Individual research project on a cultural topic approved by the instructor one semester prior to enrollment in the course. Restricted to Arabic majors.

ARB 496. Study Abroad. 1-18 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. May count towards the Arabic major.

ARB 499. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of Arabic. Repeatable for credit as topics change. Prerequisite(s): ARB 340 or consent of instructor.

ART Courses

ART 91. Visual Arts Seminar V. 0 Hours.

A continuation of VA seminar. Restricted to art majors and minors. Mandatory for all art majors after completion of ART 491.

ART 95. Art Experience. 0 Hours.

Students will assist and contribute to an art experience. The course experience will require student to facilitate and support the production of art by working with guest artists and/or contributing art to an event.

ART 101. Introduction to Studio Art. 3 Hours.

An introductory studio art course to familiarize the non-art major with the basic painting, printmaking, sculptural, jewelry, and ceramic processes. Six studio hours per week.

ART 110. Introduction to Visual Arts. 3 Hours.

Study and appreciation of visual arts. Three hour lecture.

ART 112. Computer Graphics. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the computer as it applies to page layout, digital imaging, and the visual arts. Six studio hours per week.

ART 122. Two-Dimensional Design. 3 Hours.

A basic course in the study of two-dimensional design for the studio artist. Six studio hours per week.

ART 123. Color and Design. 3 Hours.

Study of color properties and structural devices and their contributions to visual organization. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: Student must complete ART 122 before enrolling in this class, or have the consent of the instructor.

ART 124. Three-Dimensional Design. 3 Hours.

A basic course in the study of three-demensional design for the studio artist. Six studio hours per week.

ART 130. Drawing I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic drawing techniques through a variety of materials. Six studio hours per week.

ART 140. Arts & Crafts. 3 Hours.

Instruction including, but not limited to, basic techniques in fibers, glass and metal processes. Six studio hours per week.

ART 180. Digital Photography. 3 Hours.

Introduction to digital photography. Digital SLR camera and tripod required. Six studio hours per week.

ART 191. Visual Arts Seminar I. 0.5-1 Hour.

Introduction of departmental requirements, procedures and opportunities. Fall and Spring semesters required for all art majors. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors.

ART 201. Art Methods for Elementary Education. 3 Hours.

Methods of teaching art in elementary education. Six studio hours per week.

ART 204. Jewelry and Small Sculpture. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic jewelry and small sculpture techniques, design, and materials. Six studio hours per week.

ART 207. Digital Tools: Imaging & Print. 3 Hours.

An exploration of Adobe's Photoshop, Illustrator and Indesign. Covers software programs and peripherals designed for imaging and print, building basic skills and knowledge of computer programs. Prerequisite(s): ART 112.

ART 210. Art History I. 3 Hours.

A survey of western art from Paleolithic to Renaissance.

ART 211. Art History II. 3 Hours.

A survey of western art from Renaissance to present.

ART 212. Non-Western Art History. 3 Hours.

An integrated survey of the art of non-western cultures.

ART 213. Graphic Design I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the elements and practice of typography with emphasis on typefaces and letterforms in graphic design. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisities: ART 112, ART 207, ART 122, ART 123, and 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 214. Graphic Design II. 3 Hours.

Application of problem solving skills for visual communications as applied to the history of graphic design. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 213 or consent of instructor.

ART 220. Painting I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic painting through a variety of materials. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART, 122, ART 123 and ART 130.

ART 225. Water Media I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic watermedia painting fo the studio artist. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, ART 123 and ART 130, or consent of instructor.

ART 231. Figure Drawing I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic figure drawing with a live model. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122 and ART 130, or consent of instructor.

ART 250. Ceramics I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic ceramic techniques. Six studio hours per week.

ART 265. Sculpture I. 3 Hours.

Intruduction to basic sculpture materials and techniques. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, ART 123, and ART 124, or consent of instructor.

ART 266. Sculpture II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 265. Four studio hours per week. Emphasis on independent development of technique and style. Prerequisite: ART 265 or consent of instructor.

ART 270. Printmaking I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic printmaking techniques and materials: relief, monotype, and screen printing. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 122, ART 123 and 130.

ART 271. Printmaking II. 3 Hours.

Basic exploration in intaglio and lithography printing techniques. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 122, 123, and 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 274. Paper Works. 3 Hours.

Introduction to works on or of paper including book arts, papermaking, and letterpress printing. Six studio credits per week. Prerequisites: ART 122 and 123 or instructor consent.

ART 280. Traditional Photography. 3 Hours.

Introduction to traditional photography. SLR film camera and tripod required. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: Student must complete ART 122, ART 123 and ART 130 before enrolling in this class.

ART 291. Visual Arts Seminar II. 0.5-1 Hour.

A continuation of VA Seminar, including second year portfolio reviews. Fall and Spring semesters required for all Art majors. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors. Prerequisite: ART 191 or consent of instructor.

ART 296. Study Tour. 1-3 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit.

ART 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or on time offerings of current topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ART 310. Modernism. 3 Hours.

A survey of Modernism in Art.

ART 311. Postmodernism. 3 Hours.

A survey of Postmodernism in art.

ART 312. History of Architecture. 3 Hours.

A survey of architectural history from prehistory to the present.

ART 313. Women in the Visual Arts. 3 Hours.

A study of the impact of women in the visual arts throughout history.

ART 314. Art History Topics. 3 Hours.

A survey of a discipline's history from prehistory to the present. Topics are variable. Prerequisite: ART 210 and ART 211 or consent of instructor.

ART 315. Native American Art. 3 Hours.

Art and crafts of the indigenous people of the America's (North and South) through a study of their artifacts and history from pre-history to the present.

ART 322. Graphic Design III. 3 Hours.

An advanced exploration of graphic design in the contemporary digital environment, culminating in the execution of a professional portfolio. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 214.

ART 323. Illustration Techniques. 3 Hours.

Introduction to materials, techniques, and problem solving skills used in illustration. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 122, ART 123, and ART 130 or consent of instructor.

ART 325. Water Media II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 225 with renewed emphasis on development of an individualized technique, style, and concept through acrylic as well as tranparent watercolor. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 123 and 225.

ART 331. Advanced Drawing. 3 Hours.

Advanced problems in drawing including still-life, figure drawing and contemporary style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 231 or consent of instructor.

ART 332. Figure Drawing II. 3 Hours.

Advanced problems in figure drawing with a live model. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 231 or consent of instructor.

ART 333. Painting II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 220 with emphasis on independent development of technique, compostion, and style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 220 or consent of instructor.

ART 334. Painting III. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 333. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 333 or consent of instructor.

ART 351. Ceramics II. 3 Hours.

Advanced development of the individual ceramist-teacher in studio experience related to clay bodies, glazes, and firing procedures. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 250 or consent of instructor. Entry level specialization and 100 level core foundations.

ART 352. Ceramics III. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 351. Six studio hours per week. Emphasis on independent development of the techniqus and style. Prerequisite: ART 250 and 351.

ART 362. Printmaking III. 3 Hours.

Continuation of 270 and 361 with emphasis on independent development of technique, composition, and style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 270 or 361 or consent of instructor. Entry level specialization and 100 level core foundations.

ART 380. Advanced Photography. 3 Hours.

Advanced exploration of photography with emphasis on independent development of technique, composition and style. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ART 281 or ART 382.

ART 382. Alternative Photography. 3 Hours.

Course will encourage exploration and production in photographic techniques not studied in beginning photography courses, including alternative printing techniques. Repeatable to six credits. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 180 or consent of instructor.

ART 390. Art Methods. 4 Hours.

Discussion and interactive experiences developing a K-12 art curriculum. Peer teaching and classroom management, organizational techniques, and practicum. Prerequisites: ART 122, 130, 140, 201 and admitted into teacher education.

ART 391. Visual Arts Seminar III. 0.5-1 Hour.

A continuation of VA seminar, including a junior group exhibition. Fall and Spring semesters required for Art majors. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors. Prerequisite: ART 291 or consent of instructor.

ART 397. BFA Internship. 1-12 Hour.

This course is offered for variable credit. It is an internship for further experience in student's selected option. Restricted to BFA students accepted to the program.

ART 410. Advanced Independent Drawing. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in drawing. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 411. Advanced Independent Painting. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in painting. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 412. Advanced Independent Ceramics. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in ceramics. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 413. Advanced Independent Sculpture. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in sculpture. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required.This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 414. Advanced Independent Graphic Design. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in graphic design. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. This course is restricted to art majors and art education majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 415. Advanced Independent Jewelry and Small Sculpture. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in jewelry. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 416. Advanced Independent Arts & Crafts. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in arts and crafts. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 417. Advanced Independent Photography. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in photography. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 418. Advanced Independent Printmaking. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in printmaking. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 419. Advanced Independent Computer Graphics. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in computer graphics. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 420. Advanced Study in Art History. 1-6 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent research in art history. A preliminary outline of proposed research is required. This course is restricted to art majors or minors. Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

ART 421. Advanced Independent Integrated Media. 1-16 Hour.

Open to advanced art students for independent involvement in integrated media. A preliminary outline of proposed studio work and approach is required. Critiques with art staff required. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ART 422. Digital Design:Interactive Web. 3 Hours.

A study of contemporary software and theory used in interactive digital design. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisites: ART 207 and ART 213 or consent of instructor.

ART 423. Digital Design:Motion. 3 Hours.

A study of contemporary software and theory used in linear and time-based digital design. This course is restricted to art majors. Prerequisites: ART 207 and ART 213 or consent of instructor.

ART 426. BFA Thesis Research. 1 Hour.

Provides for BFA students to author a research paper that will supplement and inform the BFA capstone experience. A formal BFA committee will guide the student. Prerequisite: ART 291 or consent of instructor. Co-Requisite: ART 391 or consent of instructor. Student must be of Junior or Senior status before enrolling.

ART 491. Visual Arts Seminar IV. 0.5-1 Hour.

A continuation of VA seminar. Fall and Spring semesters required. Restricted to Art and Art Ed majors and minors. Prerequisite: ART 391 or consent of instructor.

ART 492. Capstone Experience. 2 Hours.

Provides for indivdual research culminating in a thesis project with guidance from a capstone committee. Prerequisite: ART 391 or consent of instructor. Co-requisite: ART 491 or consent of instructor. Student must be at junior or senior status before enrolling.

ART 496. Study Tour. 1-6 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. The course requirements will include additional requirements beyond the travel itself and may be repeated for credit.

ART 497. Art Internship. 1-12 Hour.

This course is offered for variable credit. It is an internship to gain further experience in student's selected option. Restricted to art majors and minors.

ART 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ASC Courses

ASC 93. Intermediate Algebra. 4 Hours.

Topics of study include properties of the real number system, factoring, linear and quadratic equations, polynomial and rational expressions, inequalities, systems of equations, exponents, radicals, function notation, rational equations, and absolute value. Graduation credit is not given for this course. Prerequisite: Students must have an ACT score of 18-20 or an SAT score of at least 400-510 or complete ASC 94 from DCB before enrolling.

BIOL Courses

BIOL 103. Intro to Medical Lab Science. 1 Hour.

Designed to acquaint first year student (freshman) medical technology students the the depth and breadth of this field. Students visit medical technology departments at local hospitals. The course is presented by the education coordinators at local hospitals. Lecture, 1 hour.

BIOL 111. Concepts of Biology. 4 Hours.

This course is designed to accommodate one semester of the general education requirement for non-science majors and Minot State University. The course will focus on a comprehensive survey of modern biology with an emphasis on enhancing the science literacy of the college educated student. Topics will include, but not limited to: cell biology, genetics, evolution by natural selection, systematics, and the impact of human activity on the biosphere. Where appropriate, topics will be illustrated with examples of the human animal and at all times the course will reflect the five strands of a general education course. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 111H. Honors Concepts of Biology. 4 Hours.

This course is designed to accomodate one semester of the general education requirement for non-science majors at Minot State University. The course will focus on a comprehensive survey of modern biology with an emphasis on enhancing the science literacy of the college-educated student. Topics will include, but are not limited to: cell biology, genetics, evolution by nature selection, systematics, and the impact of human activity on the biosphere. Where appropriate, topics will be illustrated with examples of the human animal, and at all times the course will reflect the five strands of a general education course. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Pre-requisite: admission to the Honors Program.

BIOL 115. Human Structure & Function. 4 Hours.

Structure and function of the human body. Anatomy and physiology of major body systems is emphasized. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 127. Enviromental Biology. 4 Hours.

Designed to acquaint students with major principles of ecology and the nature of human interaction with the living world. The course will focus on how human action influences the ecology of the earth. Ecological concepts covered will include community structure, predator prey interactions, competition, tropic levels, energy flow, the carbon cycle, and adaptation. In this light, students will examine specific issues and problems including those of land use choices, natural resource exploitation, biodiversity, industrialization, and urbanization.

BIOL 142. General Microbiology. 4 Hours.

A survey fo microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, microbial interaction with humans, and the impact of microorganisms on the environment. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 150. Introduction To Cellular Biology. 4 Hours.

Introduction to fundamental concepts of biology at the level of the cell including: bioenergetics, cell structure, physiology principles, genetic function and inheritance. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: Students must complete either CHEM 115 or CHEM 121 before enrolling in this course.

BIOL 150H. Honors General Biology I. 4 Hours.

Introduction to fundamental concepts of biology at the level of the cell including: bioenergetics, cell structure, physiology principles, genetic function and inheritance. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Prerequisite: Student must be admitted to the Honors Program and complete CHEM 115 or 121 before enrolling in this course.

BIOL 151. Introduction to Zoology. 4 Hours.

This introductory biology course is intended for science majors interested in animal biology. The course begins with an introduction to the scientific method and some select cellular functions. The course then introduces some basic concepts of genetics, which leads to an exploration of evolutionary theory. This is followed by an exploration of animal diversity, with a heavy emphasis on animal structure, function, and evolutionary relationships. The course ends with a brief exploration of animal ecology. Lab exercises involve some dissections of preserved animals. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 151H. Honors General Biology II. 4 Hours.

The biology of animals is covered beginning with an emphasis on the underlying cellular structure and physiology and expanding towards larger whole organism features that are difficult to predict from cell biology. The general patterns of animal life are covered. In an effort to connect the general principles offered in this course to one's daily life (e.g. cellular respiration, excretion, muscle structure and function), an emphasis is placed on a mammalian systems. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Pre-requisite: admission to the Honors Program.

BIOL 154. Introduction To Botany. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the biology of plants emphasizing evolution and diversity, plant anatomy and development, water and mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, and plant ecology. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

BIOL 154H. Honors Introduction to Botany. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the biology of plants emphasizing evolution and diversity, plant anatomy and development, water and mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, and plant ecology. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects and in-depth discussion. Pre-requisite: admission to the Honors Program.

BIOL 215. Genetics. 4 Hours.

Introduction to principles of genetics including: inheritance, DNA and chromosomes, gene regulation, evolution, and genetic engineering. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 150.

BIOL 220. Anatomy And Physiology I. 4 Hours.

Structure and function of the human body dealing with the chemical, cellular, and tissue levels of organization and integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

BIOL 221. Anatomy And Physiology II. 4 Hours.

Structure and function of the human body dealing with the digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, endocrine, reproductive, and urinary systems;special senses, metabolism, fluid and electrolyte, and acid-base balance. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 220.

BIOL 240. Biometry. 4 Hours.

The course will cover introductory statistic concepts in a form designed specifically for biology majors. It is a practical, software-based examination of concepts of sampling, hypotheses testing (non-parametric and parametric), descriptive statistics, contingency, correlation, analysis of variation, linear models and basic multivariate techniques. Only biological, real-world data will be used. The course will concentrate on underlying principles, applicability and practical use of methods covered. Prerequisites: Students must complete MATH 103 or higher and at least two of BIOL 150, 151, and 154.

BIOL 250. Cellular Biology. 4 Hours.

An advanced cell biology designed for biology majors with an emphasis on biological chemistry, membrane and transport, cellular energy metabolism,protein synthesis, and modification, subcellular organelle structure and function, and the cell biology of the nucleus. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 150.

BIOL 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

BIOL 301. Evolution. 4 Hours.

This course details the processes that influence evolutionary change. An emphasis is placed on the methodology for (1) inferring phylogenetic relationships (i.e. history), (2) determining the relative influences of natural selection and genetic drift, and (3) exploring the conditions that lead to various modes of speciation. Topics covered include population genetics, speciation, microevolution vs. macroevolution, punctuated equilibrium, life history theory, and modes of selection. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prequisites: BIOL 150, 151, 154, 215.

BIOL 310. Ethnobotany. 4 Hours.

This course will focus on the diversity of plant uses, covering approaches of diverse cultures, including introduction to medicinal plants, plant uses specific to North Dakota, and Native American plant use. Lecture, 3 hours, Lab 3 hours.

BIOL 325. Entomology. 4 Hours.

Classification, taxonomy, morphology, identificaton, life histories, interrelationships, and economic importance of insects. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Student must complete BIOL 151 before enrolling in this class.

BIOL 330. Biogeography. 4 Hours.

This course will describe the spatial patterns in the distribution of plants and animals and will examine how different factors influence these patterns. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation/lab, 2 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 151 and 154.

BIOL 335. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 4 Hours.

A study of the structure of vertebrates, with a focus on revealing the evolutionary relationships of major vertebrate groups. The laboratories will involve detailed examination and dissection of a broad range of vertebrate animals, including lampreys, sharks, amphibians, reptiles, and cats. Lecture, 3 hours; Lab, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 151 or 151H.

BIOL 340. Systematic Zoology. 4 Hours.

Evolution, classification, taxonomy, and identification of invertebrates and vertebrates. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Students must complete BIOL 151 before enrolling in this class.

BIOL 346. Developmental Biology. 4 Hours.

This course covers the morphological changes occurring during the development of select animals, as well as the current understanding of underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate development and produce those morphological changes. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Student must complete BIOL 215 before enrolling in this class.

BIOL 347. General Ecology. 4 Hours.

Plants and animals in their environment. An ecosystem approach is used. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Student must complete BIOL 150 and either 151, 142 or 154 before enrolling in this class.

BIOL 349. Plant Physiology. 4 Hours.

Physiological processes of plants with special emphasis on nutrition, metabolism, growth, and development. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150.

BIOL 350. Freshwater Biology. 4 Hours.

Biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of inland waters including origins, interrelationships and the effect of civilization. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Students must complete BIOL 142 or 150 or 151 or 154 before enrolling in this class.

BIOL 360. Morphology of Vascular Plants. 4 Hours.

Structure and development of vascular plants with special emphasis on evoltionary trends. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Students must complete BIOL 150 before enrolling in this class.

BIOL 394. Independent Study General Biol. 1-4 Hour.

BIOL 401. Population Genetics. 4 Hours.

This course explores the mechanics of evolution from the viewpoint of allelic frequnces. It begins with the basic theory of Hardy Weinberg equilbrium and expands that theory to embrace linkage disequilibrium, selection in single-locus and multifocus systems, genitic drift, and the effects of mutation rates, population size, and migration on the genetic structure of populations. Exposure is given to classic ideas (e.g., shifting balance theory and runaway sexual selection) and to applications of theroy (e.g., breeding designs, conservation genetics0. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour. Prerequisites: BIOL 215.

BIOL 402. Bioinformatics. 4 Hours.

Computational methods for stufy of biological sequence data in comparative biology and evolution. Analysis of genome content and organization. Techniques for searching sequence databases, pairwise and multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic methods, and methods for pattern recognition and functional inference from sequence data. Pre-Requisites: BIOL 150 and MATH 103 or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 405. Prokaryotic Physiology. 4 Hours.

Indept examination of the physiology, metabolism, and genetics of bacteria and archaea. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 215 and 151 or 142, or 154.

BIOL 420. Co-Op Practicum. 4-8 Hour.

A cooperative program with industry, state, and federal agencies for an in-depth study of a specialized aspect of biology. Students spend approximately 25 clock hours per semester hour for the practicum. Prerequisites: 2 years of biology or consent of biology coordinator.

BIOL 430. Pre-Veterinary Practicum. 3 Hours.

This program is designed to give MSU students a hands-on experience in veterinary medicine. The students spend about 80 houts per semester for the practicum. Prerequisite: 2 years of biology.

BIOL 440. Pre-Med Practicum. 3 Hours.

This program is designed to give MSU students a basic understanding of the hospital and its functions. Students spend approximately 90 hours per semester in the various departments and the family practice clinic. Students are supervised by the physicians involved in the program while the program is corrdinated by a biology professor on campus. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

BIOL 445. Cancer Biology. 4 Hours.

This course describes the major aspects of cell cycle control and relates them to the multiple cell cycle defects associated with cancer. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 215.

BIOL 448. Systematic Botany. 4 Hours.

Classification and taxonomy of plants with emphasis on local flora. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 154.

BIOL 450. Parasitology. 4 Hours.

Morphology, taxonomy, and life histories of the endemic, exotic, and zoonotic parasites of the animal kingdom. Diseases caused by parasites are also presented. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Restricted to students who Medical Laboratory Science majors.

BIOL 455. Hematology. 4 Hours.

Study of the blood and hematologic disorders including anemia, leukemia, and other blood dyscrasias. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Restricted to students who Medical Laboratory Science majors.

BIOL 458. Anatomy of Seed Plants. 4 Hours.

Development of cells, tissues, and organs in seed plants. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150.

BIOL 460. Herpetology. 4 Hours.

Herpetology is the study of reptiles (exclusive of birds) and amphibians; this includes extant groups (e.g., frogs) and extinct groups (e.g., dinsaurs). This course begins with the phylogeny, history, and taxonomy of "herps" (i.e., reptiles and amphibians) and progresses to coverage of physiology, ecology, and behavior. Prerequisite: BIOL151.

BIOL 465. Immunology. 4 Hours.

Principles and techniques of immunology and serology. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 150.

BIOL 470. Histology. 4 Hours.

The course presents the microscopic anatomy of vertebrates with an emphasis on humans.Structure-function relationships at the cell and tissue levels are highlighted. Cell and tissue anatomy comprise the structural basis of normal physiology. Knowledge of histology is essential for understanding disease mechanisms in terms of altered structure and function of the body. Students are expected to identify cells, tissues and organs, and understand the structural basis of their function. Emphasis is placed on microscopic study in laboratories. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 4 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or 220.

BIOL 475. Clinical Microbiology. 4 Hours.

Isolation, identification, and clinical application of pathogenic microorganisms. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 142.

BIOL 480. Molecular Biology. 4 Hours.

This course covers a variety of topics concerning the macromolecules of living cells, focusing on nucleic acids and proteins. Major areas of stufy include: DNA replication and transcription, protein synthesis (translation), and comparison of processses in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The latter part of the course will focus on mechanisms of gene expression, the molecular genetics fo cancer, and applied molecular biology. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Student must complete BIOL 215 before enrolling in this class.

BIOL 482. Neurobiology. 4 Hours.

This course covers the organization and function of the nervous system. Students will learn about the nervous system at the anatomical, neurophysiological and molecular level. The course starts with the study of neuron at the cellular level and how they communicate chemically as individual cells and as a group. We then cover topics in sensation and how the nervous system commands the body. In the later part of the semester we will examine the neurobiology of human behavior, such as motivation, attention etc. and mental illnesses. Lecture, 3 hours. Laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: Students must complete BIOL 150, CHEM 121, and 122 before enrolling in this course. Student must also have sophomore status or higher.

BIOL 492. Directed Research. 1-5 Hour.

The faculty of the Department of Biology considers a valuable component of the curriculum. The content and extent of research projects are determined by the student and a faculty sponsor. The research may be in the lab or field and is intended to help the student develop a greater appreciation of the scientific process. While publication is not a requirement, all projects have a goal of producing publishable results. A successful experience in research can be an asset for graduate studies and many careers in biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 and 151, or 142, or 154.

BIOL 497. Co-Op Practicum. 4-8 Hour.

3/94 Dropped Q For Prereq Purposes Consent Of Biology Coordinator.

BIOL 498. Honors Spec Prob-Biol. 1-4 Hour.

3/94 Dropped Q For Prereq Purposes.

BIOL 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

CHEM Courses

CHEM 110. Survey of Chemistry. 4 Hours.

An introductory course covering topics that concern students' everyday lives. This course is designed for liberal arts and general education students. The course consists of an introduction to the science and includes historical perspectives. The course is intended to present chemistry in its broad culture, social, and economic context. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

CHEM 110H. Honors Survey of Chemistry. 4 Hours.

An introductory course covering topics that concern students' everyday lives. This course is designed for liberal arts and general education students. The course consists of an introduction to the science and includes historical perspectives. The course is designed to present chemistry in its broad cultural, social, and economic context. Assignments will include investigation of specific topics and written descriptions of the findings. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Honors program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor.

CHEM 115. Introductory Chemistry. 4 Hours.

Presents knowledge of concepts of chemical principles in greater depth and with more mathematical applications than in CHEM 110. Includes studies of general inorganic principles. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

CHEM 115H. Honors Introductory Chemistry. 4 Hours.

This course introduces concepts in general, organic, and biochemistry. Topics likely to be covered include: measurement, atoms, molecules, elements, the periodic table, nuclear chemistry, compounds, bonds, molecular geometry, classes of organic compounds, gases, liquids, solutions, chemical reactions, solutions, acids, bases, and biochemical compounds. Assignments will include investigation of specific topics and written descriptions of the findings. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: Math 102 or 103. Prerequisite: Honors program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor.

CHEM 121. General Chemistry I. 5 Hours.

This course is the first of two-semester sequence primarily intended for students majoring in science and science-related fields. Topics likely to be covered in this semester include; matter, measurement, atoms, ions, molecules, reactions, chemical calculations, thermochemistry, bonding, molecular geometrym periodicity, and gases. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: MATH 103.

CHEM 121H. Honors General Chemistry I. 5 Hours.

This course is the first of a two-semester sequence primarily intended for students majoring in science and science-related fields. Topics likely to be covered in this semester include: matter, measurement, atoms ions, molecules, reactions, chemical calculations, thermochemistry, bonding, molecular geometry, periodicity. and gases. Note: CHEM 121 and 121L must be taken concurrently. Assignments will include investigations of specific topics and written descriptions of the findings. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: MATH 103. Prerequisite: Honors program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor.

CHEM 122. General Chemistry II. 5 Hours.

This course in the second of a two-semester sequence primarily intended for students majoring in science and science-related fields. Topics likely to be covered in this semester include: intermolecular forces, liquids, solids, kinetics, equilibria, acids, bases, solution chemistry, precipitation, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 121.

CHEM 122H. Honors General Chemistry II. 5 Hours.

This course is the second of a two-semester sequence primarily intended for students majoring in science and science-related fields. Topics likely to be covered in this semester include: intermolecular forces, liquids, solids, kinetics, equilibria, acids, bases, solutions chemistry, precipitation, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Assignments will include investigation of specific topics and written descriptions of the findings. Lecture, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: MATH 103. Prerequisites: CHEM 121H/121HL, Honors program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor.

CHEM 127. Chemistry of the Environment. 4 Hours.

This course is unique in that it uses topics of concern/interest to facilitate the learning and understanding of the scientific concepts behind them. The course will use current environmental topics, such as our atmosphere, global warming, energy, the ozone layer and water quality, to bring forward important chemical concepts as naming, bonding, stoichiometry, energetics, pH and chemical reactions. The course will also bring an interdisciplinary flavor to the material, discussing such topics as the carbon cycle and biological contributions, how earth processes may affect the quality of our drinking water and the effect of acid rain on the earth (both in terms of the geology and the ecosystem).

CHEM 227. Principles of Environmental Chemistry. 4 Hours.

Designed to provide students with a basic introduction to Environmental Chemistry. The course will introduce students to the environmental pathways, toxicology, and organic and inorganic environmental contaminants. The students will also study various processes in the environment, including those in air, soil, and water. Depending on time, the students may also be introduced to the managment of hazardous chemicals. Prerequisite: Student must complete CHEM 127 before enrolling in this course.

CHEM 230. Quantitative Analysis. 5 Hours.

A course in quantitative chemistry including gravimetric and volumetric analysis, statistical treatment of data, and an introdution to some instrumental analysis. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 122.

CHEM 240. Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry. 5 Hours.

Theory of bonding and structure in organic molecules and their reactions. An emphasis on functional groups related to biological molecules. This course presents the minimum preparation for CHEM 480. Offered in the spring. Lecture, 4 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 122.

CHEM 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

CHEM 341. Organic Chemistry I. 5 Hours.

A study of different classes of organic funtional groups, thier nomenclature, reactions, and properties. An introduction to Infrared and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is included. Offered in the fall. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour. Prerequisite: CHEM 122.

CHEM 342. Organic Chemistry II. 5 Hours.

A continuation of CHEM 341. A study of the chemical and mechanistic properties of organic functional groups. Offered in the spring. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours; recitation, 1 hour. Prerequisite: CHEM 341.

CHEM 360. Principles of Physical Chemistry. 4 Hours.

This course in designed for students interested in chemical education at the secondary level. Topics include gas laws, thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics, quantum mechanicsm and spectroscopy. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 230 and MATH 107.

CHEM 380. Environmental Chemistry. 4 Hours.

The course examines the interaction of chemical substances with the environment. Emphasis is placed on water quality and air quality. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 230.

CHEM 420. Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Hours.

An advanced course in inorganic chemistry, including theories of covalent and ionic bonding, crystalline structure, coordinate covalent bonding, group theory, and coordination chemistry. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 122, MATH 165.

CHEM 422. Inorganic Synthesis. 1 Hour.

Applied techniques in inorganic synthesis and conpound characterization. Offered on demand. Laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 420.

CHEM 430. Instrumental Analysis. 5 Hours.

A survey of instrumental methods used for chemical analysis. These methods include molecular absorption, atomic absorption and emission, fluorescence and phosphorescencem infrared absorption chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 230.

CHEM 440. Organic Spectroscopy. 3 Hours.

Indentification of organic molecules via spectroscopic methods. Methods studied include infrared, UV-visible, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 342.

CHEM 442. Medicinal Chemistry. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students interested in medicinal applications of organic chemistry and for students interested in continuing their education in medicine, pharmacy, and other health related fields. The course offers the study of major classes of medicinal compounds presented in a broad historic and cultural perspective of the development of medicinal chemistry from the first attempt to synthesize quinine in the early XIX century to modern days' antibiotics. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 342 and junior or senior status.

CHEM 461. Physical Chemistry I. 4 Hours.

This course is the first of a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physical chemistry for chemistry majors. Topics covered include thermodynamics and equilibrium. Offered alternate years. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 122, MATH 166, and PHYS 222.

CHEM 462. Physical Chemistry II. 4 Hours.

A continuation of CHEM 461. Topics include: quantum mechanics, molecular orbital theory, group theory, and spectroscopy. Offered alternate spring terms. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 461.

CHEM 480L. Biochemistry Laboratory. 2 Hours.

A course covering theory and laboratory experience with a variety of techniques used in biochemistry. Laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 230. Corequisite: CHEM 481.

CHEM 481. Biochemistry I. 3 Hours.

Study of major classes of biological compounds, synthesis of macromolecules, enzyme kinetics, intermediary metabolism, and control mechanisms. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and CHEM 240 or 342.

CHEM 482. Biochemistry II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of CHEM 481 with more in-depth studies of particular pathways; particular emphasis is placed on medicinal chemistry and on corresponding clinical applications associated with the various pathways. Lecture 3 hours; Pre-requisite CHEM 481.

CHEM 494. Directed Research in Chemistry. 1-6 Hour.

Students conduct research under the direction of a faculty mentor. The general topic and specific goals and activities are agreed upon by the student the mentor. The number of credits is proportional to the time committed to the research.

CHEM 497. Internship in Chemistry. 1-4 Hour.

A cooperative occupational training program in the field of chemistry or a related area. The course may be repeated in the same or different position. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval and student must be a Chemistry or Chemistry Education major. Student must be at Junior or Senior status.

CHEM 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

CJ Courses

CJ 201. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Survey of 21st Century US Criminal Justice including law, law making and court decisions, law enforcement, courts and prosecution, corrections, juvenile justice, and interface with Homeland Security, FEMA, private security, and contract justice services, and international criminal justice. Prerequisite for CJ 322, 300, 340, 370, 380, and 491. Recommended for all other CJ courses.

CJ 226. Introduction to Criminal Investigation. 3 Hours.

This course provides a broad examination of the basic principles involved in conducting a criminal investigation. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 227. Crimes Against Children. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the recognized physical, emotional, and behavioral indicators of abuse and mistreatment of children and adolescents, and the factors and conditions which can influence their adult offenders. Potential intervention approaches will be examined regarding their suitability and desired outcomes while regarding the family relationship.

CJ 229. Interviewing and Interrogation. 3 Hours.

Examination of interviewing and interrogation knowledge, principles, interpersonal skills, methods and techniques for understanding the psychological, ethical, and legal aspects of obtaining information from subjects. Course provides the fundamentals used in law enforcement, probation, corrections, juvenile justice, and homeland security, as well as in other areas of application.

CJ 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Independent investigations of topics of special interest related to criminal justice. Topics may vary to reflect contemporary criminal justice issues. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 300. Policing. 3 Hours.

An historical examination of the evolution of the role of police in Western culture; included are the philosophical, social, legal, political, educational, and religious influences on the purpose of police power of the state; examines current and future trends, research, and pratices that are developed for the policing function; discusses the social and individual effectd of police work in Western society. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 302. Use of Force in Policing. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the origins of police use of force to include a review of case law and department policy involving the various use of force levels by law enforcement. Students will research and review specific instances where the use of force by law enforcement have occurred. The course will include an examination of the subculture of policing and the situational factors affecting an officer's use of force and as a victim of violence. The course will review of the investigatory and judicial process after a law enforcement use of force incident and the statistical information involving the use of force by law enforcement. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJ 201).

CJ 320. Community Corrections. 3 Hours.

This class is intended to provide an analysis of probation, parole, and intermediate punishments. The course includes a brief overview of the history of community corrections in the United States. It is designed to familiarize students with the most recent developments in community-based corrections, including implementation, management, effectiveness, and challenges. It provides detailed descriptions of alternatives to incarceration, assumptions underlying programs, and outcome studies. A significant amount of discussion and in-depth analyses will include topics of probation, parole, community corrections officers, treatment, offender assessment, and intermediate punishments. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 322. Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

A critical examination of the development and function of western criminal law; analyzes current definitions of criminal acts and omissions, defenses, and justifications in the social and legal society of the United States. Prerequisite: Student must complete CJ 201 before enrolling in this class.

CJ 330. Criminological Theory. 3 Hours.

Provides an examination of the majot criminological schools ot thought as well as the prominent theorists within each school; theories are presented that examine criminal motivation and the application of criminal law; additionally, the implicit theoretical assumptions regarding the punishment of offenders is examined. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 332. Restorative Justice. 3 Hours.

A different approach to discipline, restorative justice, focuses on restoring the offender, victim, and the community. This class will examine the history of restorative justice, restorative justice programs for adult and juvenile offenders, effectiveness of its use, and offender populations most commonly selected for restorative justice inventions. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 335. -Private Security and Private Justice Organizations. 3 Hours.

- Course inactivated 02/16/2017. This course introduces the areas of Private Security, Loss Prevention, Corporate Technology Security, Contract-based Private Sector Criminal Justice Organizations and their relationship to traditional components of American Criminal Justice and Homeland Security. Recommended: CJ 201.

CJ 340. Juvenile Justice System. 3 Hours.

Illustrated major components of juvenile justice system, including arrest, intake, adjudication, and disposition of juvenile offenders; examines transfer process for treating juveniles as adults; describes landmark legal cases extending rights to juveniles; examines juveniles court organization as an adversarial system; treatment of contemporary juvenile justice issues, including death penalty for juveniles and deinstitutionalization of status offenders. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 344. Media, Internet and Crime. 3 Hours.

Media, Internet, and Crime will prepare students to understand how mass media presents crime, criminals, and the American criminal justice system with respect to policing, courts, and corrections. The focus of this course will look at the historical evolution of media (sound, print, visual, comic books, film, television, video games, recorders) and the impact of the computer and the internet in the 21st century as it applies to dissemination of crime-related information. This course will attempt to dispel common misconceptions about the mass media's effects on crime and justice. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 345. Policy Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Assessment of the development, efficacy, and politics of criminal justice policy. Emphasis on analyzing the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 348. Legal & Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course explores a wide range of legal philosophies and ethical issues in decision making and agency operations. Included are conflict in standards, decision making and operational priorities during routine and crises situations, professionalism in recognizing and dealing with questionable behavior of individuals, and the consequences of failing to deal effectively with them. Recommended: 201.

CJ 350. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to expose students to the rules and procedures in which criminal prosecutions are governed. The course begins with examining the rules and procedures of police investigations and continues throughout the process of the criminal justice process. Examples of questions that criminal procedures addresses are: When can a police officer conduct a search of a home? When can a probation officer enter probation's home without notice? Students will also examine the historical foundation of these rules and procedures. Prerequisite: Student must complete CJ 201 before enrolling in this class.

CJ 362. Gender Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course will look at the constantly evolving gendered nature of crime, criminal justice theory, policy and practice and emerging legal doctrines about privacy and sexual rights. Key themes will include gender differences in criminal behavior, criminal victimization, criminal processing and law progression. In addition, the discussion of evolution of gender employment in the Criminal justice system will be included.Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 364. Cybercrime. 3 Hours.

Cyber world is a recent context where many crime-related activities are going on at an incredible phase in different formats. The major objective of this course is to prepare students for their future careers in the field of criminal justice or related areas by providing essential knowledge with the major concepts, trends and issues in regards to the crimes committed in this very context. This course will be a general survey of the topic where the following areas will be covered during the course; - Computer as target (access offenses, interception of data, etc.) - Fraud and related issues on cyberworld - Content-related offenses (pornography, gambling, etc.) - Offenses against the person (harassment, etc.) - Major principles and procedures in the investigation of cybercrimes - Legal and jurisdictional matters. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 365. Law & Society. 3 Hours.

Examination of the various perspectives on th development and implementation of law and assessment of the various facets of law in action. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 366. International Crime. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to international crime and international criminal justice. Issues discussed include topics like globalization and globalized crime, international criminal law, international and transnational crimes, contemporary slavery, human smuggling and human trafficking. The course's goals should be viewed in the context of the phenomenon of globalization. An increasing number of people hold the view that because of globalization we cannot afford to ignore what happens in the world outside of the United States, and that knowledge of other cultures - including cultures of law and legal systems - is absolutely crucial in order to be able to meaningfully and respectfully interact with other nations of the world. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 368. Campus Crime. 3 Hours.

This course will give students a comprehensive understanding of campus crime and victimization. Special attention will be given to understating the scope of the crime problem nationally and within North Dakota with a focus on victims of sexual assault. The course will also actively research intervention strategies, prevention policies, and the role of the Clery Act, Title IX, and student responses to the problem.

CJ 370. Court Processing and Sentencing. 3 Hours.

Provides students with a comprehensive analysis of the U.S. court system; the function of state and federal district, appellate, and supreme courts is reviewed; students are introduced to the influence of extra-legal factors and their differential impact on offender processing; contemporary criminal justice issues facing the court system are also examined. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 372. Juries. 3 Hours.

The primary objective of this course is to offer students a comprehensive, critical analysis of the jury system in the United States. A few of the issues to be examined are: jury selection and service, jury nullification, jury decision-making, information processing, juries and tort awards, and juror competence. A special emphasis will focus on the capital jury process and decision-making. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 374. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an depth study of international criminal justice and legal traditions and systems. Students will be complete critique of the differences and similarities among various international criminal justice and U.S. justice and legal systems. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 375. Gangs. 3 Hours.

Explores gang phenomena in U.S.; concentrates in recent research about formation and gang related violence including the various criminological theories that explain the social, economic, political, and environmental reasons for the rise of gangs in various American urban centers. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 380. Corrections. 3 Hours.

Examines institutionalization of convicted offenders; describes jails and prisons; investigates issues including privatization of prison operations, inmate rights; correctional officer duties/training/ responsibilities are described; examines post-institutionalization experiences of released inmates in community programs; examines classification systems used to determine one's level of custody; describes different types of prisons/jails and their functions. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 381. Institutional Corrections. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the various issues in prisons and jails in the U.S. Past and current literature will be discussed regarding institutional corrections and participants in prisons and jails, including inmates, officers, and administrators. The explored issues include the purposes of incarceration, differences between jails and prisons, adaptation to life in prison for inmates, differences between male and female inmate experiences, correctional officers, prison violence, relationships in prison, and prisoners' rights. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 382. Correctional Rehabilitation. 3 Hours.

Various issues related to the implementation and effectiveness of correctional treatment approaches and programs will be presented in this course. This course will cover specific correctional programs, the risk/needs/responsivity model for effective correctional programming, the history regarding the goals of corrections, the research on whether correctional programs are reducing crime, and the most common targets for correctional interventions. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 383. Offender Risk Assessment and Typology. 3 Hours.

Almost all correctional settings, institutional or community-based, rely on offender assessment to guide practices with offenders. This class will provide a hands-on approach to conducting numerous actuarial risk assessments commonly used in correctional practice, such as the Level of Service Inventory- Revised (LSI-R). It will also discuss the barriers of offender typology in actuarial risk assessments including sexual offenders, drug offenders, and female offenders. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 384. Special Correctional Populations. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to special correctional populations including: sexual offenders, drug offenders, female offenders, those with mental illness, those with learning disabilities, and others. Various definitions of these offenders will be examined as well as the theories behind their criminal behavior. Appropriate assessment, placement, and treatment of special correctional populations will guide the course. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 385. Terrorism & Homeland Security. 3 Hours.

Explores terrorism from an international and national perspective; examines the social, political, and cultural reasons for terrorism including the Department of Homeland Security's response to terrorism in the U.S. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 386. Juvenile Corrections. 3 Hours.

This course includes an examination of the history of ideas about and responses to juvenile delinquency. The course will also evaluate the scope and nature of juvenile delinquency historically and today. Explanations of the different patterns of offending and types of offending of juvenile delinquents as well as effective correctional practices will be examined. Finally, the course will devote a significant amount of time critiquing the responses of various parts of the juvenile justice system including probation officers, as well as responses by other social institutions such as the family, community, and schools. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 387. Punishment-From Corporal to Capital. 3 Hours.

Capital punishment is a controversial topic within the field of criminal justice. This course will provide students with the opportunity to get acquainted with the history of capital punishment; introduce the social and political perspectives that surround punishment; explore methods and costs of capital executions and other means of punishment such as prisons; review moral, ethical and political arguments related to the use of punishment; and examine the implications of using the death penalty as a form of punishment. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 390. Criminal Justice in Indian Country. 3 Hours.

Course examines historical and contemporary issues of crime, delinquency, justice, and public safety on American Indian Reservations and Alaskan Native Villages in the US. Specific focus will be given tribal justice systems; tribal interactions with Federal Justice Organizations (FBI, Federal Courts and Probation, Federal Bureau of Prisons), as well as tribal interface with local/county/state police, courts and corrections in 280 states such as ND. Tribal law and order reforms under PL 111-211 are examined along with reform policies for dealing with domestic violence, substance abuse, and gang violence. Recommended: CJ 201.

CJ 394. Independent Study General CJ. 1-6 Hour.

Intensive study of sustantive interest areas of students; major literature review leading to analytical paper; topics chosen collaboratively by student and instructor/advisor. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CJ 395. Victims & Victimology. 3 Hours.

The course provides a student's overview of the characteristics and trends of victims in a variety of settings, and the criminal justice system's perception and response to these individuals. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 401. Administration of Criminal Justice Systems. 3 Hours.

Overview of organizational theory as it applies to the administration of Criminal Justice agencies. Emphasis on criminal justice management theory and policy development. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 402. Management Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course examines organizational management problems and issues that impact the American justice organizations including police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice. The course addresses organizational theories of administration and management and how these can be applied to contemporary criminal justice management issues. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 420. Homeland Security Advance. 3 Hours.

This course builds on a student's knowledge about the American Criminal Justice System and its relation to Homeland Security. Course examines Homeland Security's history, legal foundation, national infrastructure and interface with criminal justice. Specific focus is given: intelligence and counterintelligence, weapons of mass destruction, cyber-crime, organized crime, domestic and border security, and immigration issues. Incident command and control systems, adopted in 2012 are discussed. Students completing the course satisfactorily may wish to obtain FEMA certificates. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or consent of Department.

CJ 450. White-Collar Crime. 3 Hours.

Categories of job offending are analyzed through criminological theory, law, and the criminal and regulatory justice systems, including corporate crime, professional crime, individual crime, and crime by state workers. Traditional and novel strategies for the social control of these offenses are also presented. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 480. Research Methods in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce scientific research methodologies to current issues in criminal justice. Research designs, sampling populations (inmates, juvenile delinquents, and minorities) will be the primary focus. Additionally, students will be provided with hands-on experience in developing a research proposal which incorporates methods and analyses for their criminology study. Prerequisites: CJ 201 and CJ 330.

CJ 481. Data Analysis Strategies in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course examines fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistical analysis of various types of data used within criminal justice. Specifically, this course explores the appropriate use of data, the limits of various methods, how data is collected and organized, and how to interpret and report findings from the statistical analysis. The students will be exposed to, at least, one of the most commonly used statistical analyses software and gain practical experience in carrying out essential statistical analyses through this software. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

CJ 491. Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

Integration of program outcomes with application of knowledge, values, and skills necessary for field entry, value and ethical considerations, and the development and implementation of future career objectives. Provides application of core courses, provides students with current developments in key core areas. Prerequisites: CJ 201, criminal justice major, senior status and must have completed all CJ core courses.

CJ 494. Directed Criminal Justice Research. 1-8 Hour.

CJ 497. Field Experience. 1-6 Hour.

Students practicum in a criminal justice or related agency; course may be repeated in either the same or different agency; designed to enhance these experiences, supplementary readings and written assignments are required. Prerequisites: CJ 201 or consent of instructor; all core requirements must be completed before enrolling; may be repeated once for 3 credit hours.

CJ 499. Special Topics Criminal Justice. 1-8 Hour.

Specialized topics offered as regular classes; topics vary depending upon student and faculty interest. Prerequisite: CJ 201.

COMM Courses

COMM 099. Recitals. 0 Hours.

This is a zero credit course required of all communication arts majors and minors, and is required each semester in attendance. It is designed to accumulate information about each student's required attendance at predesignated communication arts department recitals.

COMM 110. Fundamentals of Public Speaking. 3 Hours.

The theory and practice of public speaking with emphasis on topic selection, content, organization of material, language, methods of securing attention and maintaining interest, delivery and critical evaluation of informative and persuasive messages. May no be used as part of communication arts major, minor, of concentration.

COMM 120. Introduction to Broadcasting. 3 Hours.

Basic introduction to commercial and non-commercial broadcasting.

COMM 191. Freshman Seminar. 1 Hour.

Introduction to departmental requirements and opportunities. Pre-requisite: Communication major or minor.

COMM 210. Advanced Public Speaking. 3 Hours.

An advanced course in the art of oral discourse. Emphasis is placed on professional presentations, adapting to diverse audiences, logic, persuasion, and rhetorical analysis. Prerequisite: COMM 110 or consent of instructor.

COMM 211. Communication & Popular Culture. 3 Hours.

Includes analysis of audience, occasion, subject, and speaker. Subject matter will include such media as movies, songs, television, humot, fashion, public demonstration, advertisements, architecture, etc. Includes text readings, group discussion, analtrical essays, and a critical paper and presentation.

COMM 212. Interpersonal Communication. 3 Hours.

Introduces fundamental concepts of communication between individuals. Exploring aspects of self expression, relationship communication-how people present themselves, and how others perceive them in return.

COMM 218. Public Relations Principles. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the theory and practice of public relations, emphasizing management functions, its publics, writing skills, communication process, tools, and professional ethics.

COMM 219. Mass Media and Society. 3 Hours.

Basic communication theory and its application to mass communication with emphasis on social, cultural, and political implication of the media.

COMM 220. Broadcast Advertising & Applications. 3 Hours.

This course will examine, through research and field experience, the fundemental elements of electronic advertising practices and applications. Students will learn success factors that increase the power of advertising through mass media. Restricted to sophomore, junior, and senior status.

COMM 221. PR & Media Writing. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic writing skills in the field of public relations & the media. This is a writing intensive course. You will learn how to adapt message for various media & mediums. Specifically, you will learn to compose news releases, media advisories, internal communications information, and more. Active writing is a key component taught in this course. This course teaches students how to prepare professional public relations messages for print electronic media.

COMM 224. Publication Makeup & Design. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the technical aspects of newspaper, magazine, and yearbook production.

COMM 225. Audio Production I. 3 Hours.

Laboratory and lecture course with emphasis on the principles and techniques of radio production and programming.

COMM 244. Reporting and Feature Writing. 3 Hours.

Introduction to news gathering, judgment, writing, history, conventions, and style of the news story, the newspaper feature story, and the magazine article.

COMM 281. Reporting & Editing. 1 Hour.

Laboratory course in which class members work on the campus paper and attend staff meetings. Repeatable up to eight credits.

COMM 283. TV Activities. 1 Hour.

An opportunity for students to work on various projects that they will produce for on and off campus. Repeatable up to eight credits.

COMM 284. Radio Activities. 1 Hour.

An opportunity for students to work on various audio projects that they will produce for on and off campus groups. Repeatable up to eight credits.

COMM 285. Communication Arts Activities. 1 Hour.

The participation in a significant capacity in any communication arts activity above and beyond the requirements of a specific course. Repeatable up to eight credits.

COMM 286. Promotions Activities. 1 Hour.

The course provides students with an understanding of how to strategically plan promotions. Students are able to engage in real life events activities such as planning, marketing, advertising, production, writing, and more. Students are taught time management along side promotions. This course specifically directs students to have hands on experience within the Broadcasting Department. More directly, writing newsletters, promotions of channel 19, alumni relations, web site writing & creation, and advertising.

COMM 291. Sophomore Seminar. 1 Hour.

Study of communication (people, events, activities) as determined by student/professor consultation. Pre-requisite: Communication major or minor.

COMM 297. Internship. 1-2 Hour.

Hands-on experience in the discipline. Restricted to Communication majors or minor or consent of instructor.

COMM 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

COMM 311. Oral Interpretation. 3 Hours.

The study of literature for performance with emphasis on written and verbal analysis. The technique of performance applied to oral reading of literature.

COMM 315. Persuasion & Argumentation. 3 Hours.

An investigation of the structure, types, and tests of arguments with practical application in preparing and presenting persuasive speeches. Prerequisite: COMM 110 or consent of instructor.

COMM 316. Group Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Study of techniques of group discussion and small group theory with emphasis on participating in various types of discussion and conferences.

COMM 318. Organizational Communication. 3 Hours.

The course is a study of communication practices in organizations by examining organizational structure, leadership, teambuilding, and ethics. The course will include communication areas such as diversity, conflict, stress, and technology.

COMM 322. Media Sales and Analysis. 3 Hours.

A close up look at the business of broadcast advertising, including radio, TV, and cable.

COMM 323. Journalism History. 3 Hours.

Examination of the news gathering function of the mass media with special emphasis on press theory and the development of thought of freedom of expression.

COMM 324. Community Relations. 3 Hours.

This course examines current communication strategies used to establish and maintain contact with communities. Sects of society integrate communication differently and it's essential to a public relations practitioner to understand those levels of communication. This class explores a variety of ways to maintain community relations, focusing specifically on technology and social networking. Most importantly it informs students how to utilize community resources to promote strong community relations.

COMM 325. Campaigns and Strategies. 3 Hours.

This course will explore marketing, public relations, and advertising relationships in today's market. The textbook, classroom lectures, guest speakers, and assignments will build a solid foundation in the fundamentals needed to develop and implement campaigns and strategies in the field of public relations, advertising, and marketing. Prerequisites: COMM 218 and junior or senior status.

COMM 326. Media Announcing. 3 Hours.

Theories, practices,a dn techniques of "on-air" presentation will be the focus of this course. Students will develop the skills necessary to perform a variety of media announcing tasks. Students will study the techniques and styles required to perform as media newscaster, interviewers, program hosts, commercial and public service announcers. Prerequisite: COMM 120 or consent of instructor.

COMM 328. Play by Play Communication. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the theory and practice of electronic media sports coverage, with an emphasis on the role, skills and practice of radio and TV sports announcers and electronic sports media journalism. The class includes play-by-play broadcasts and a class project.

COMM 329. Sports Television Production. 3 Hours.

Professional sports media at an advanced level. Special topics in areas such as sports media production, announcing, performance and sports feature. The course will emphasize other performance situations, such as producing and anchoring radio and television sportscasts. After completing this course, students will be able to develop, write, pre-produce, produce, perform as talent and post-produce programming for broadcast sports media.

COMM 344. Investigative Reporting. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the subject matter, techniques and ethics of investigative reporting. It will include such topics as secondary sources, primary documents, people sources, computer-assisted reporting, writing projects, accuracy and ethics. Prerequisite: COMM 244.

COMM 354. Special Events Planning. 3 Hours.

The course will introduce students to special events processes and techniques. Students will become knowledgeable about model workplace skills, leadership development, promotions, media relations, and production associated with an event. Site selection, program planning, and material development will be amoung other disignations for the course.

COMM 360. Video Production I. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on the operation of video, audio, and editing equipment. Prerequisite: COMM 120.

COMM 361. Broadcast News Writing. 3 Hours.

Intensive survey and application of gathering, writing, and presenting.

COMM 362. Broadcast News Gathering. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the practical knomledge of basic electronic news gathering production techniques, as well as to learn to operate equipment associated with ENG. Students will learn the correct terminology and the basic formats of ENG. Prerequisite: COMM 360.

COMM 388. Communication for Educators. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students pursuing an education or related degree. It will include the study of various communication opportunities faced by person in a profession educational setting.

COMM 389. Directing Forensics. 2 Hours.

Theory, philosophy, and practice in speech contest/festeval design and of coaching individual forensic events and debate. Designed for the teacher who will be asked to coach speech on the secondary level. May be taken at the same time as student teaching.

COMM 390. Communication Arts Methods. 4 Hours.

Methods and materials for creative teaching of speaking, listening, and theatre and broadcast activities, in today's secondary school environment. Prerequisite: Adminttance to Teacher Eduation.

COMM 392. Junior Project. 1 Hour.

The course will include proposal writing procedures and defense, journal writing, research as dictated by the individual's project, public relations policies leading to the public presentation of a recital. All in prepatation for the Senior Recital. Prerequisite: COMM 099.

COMM 394. independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of communication. Pre-requisiste: Communication major or minor.

COMM 395. Service Learning. 3 Hours.

Students will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate (a) personal community or global service experience(s). Pre-requisite: Communication major or minor.

COMM 397. Communication Arts Practicum. 1-3 Hour.

Student Internship with application of specialized speech techniques in broadcasting, theatre, or other areas of communication arts.

COMM 410. Advanced Problems. 3 Hours.

Courses beyond the present offerings on broadcasting, speech communication, and theatre arts. No more than three courses may be accrued.

COMM 411. Communication Issues & Ethics. 3 Hours.

The course will focus on current communications issues in social and workplace settings. Areas of study will include the history of free speech, the responsibility of the media, the responsibility of the individual as sender and receiver of messages, and ethical decision making.

COMM 412. Communication Law. 3 Hours.

A study of the regulatory policies (federal, state, and municipal) in modern electronic and print media.

COMM 413. Gender Communication. 3 Hours.

Course designed to explore the theories surrounding differences and similarities in male and female communication. Focus on ways in which gender roles originated and are sustained in a variety of context including families, organizations, institutions, peer groups, the media, and interpersonal relationships. Prerequisites: COMM 110 and junior of senior status.

COMM 425. Crisis Communication. 3 Hours.

This course develops the public relations practitioner from a theoretical and professional approach. Students will learn how to incorporate grounded theory into crisis management plans. This course develops the research base focusing on fundamental case studies within the field in order to develop a proactive approach to crisis management. Students will learn how to use an ethical framework when engaging communities, organizations or the society at large before, during and after a crisis situation. Prerequisite(s):COMM 218.

COMM 460. Video Production II. 3 Hours.

Use of TV video, audio, and editing equipment in various news and commercial applications. Prerequisite: COMM 360.

COMM 475. Broadcast Production. 1-3 Hour.

The operations, techniques, and practices of broadcast production. Activities include originating, acquiring, organizing, and assembling news segments into a complete television program. Can be repeated for up to eight credits. Prerequisite: COMM 360.

COMM 492. Senior Project. 3 Hours.

Special project undertaken during the senior year with the direct supervision of an instructor. Project may be chosen from any area of the communication arts department. Prerequisites: COMM 099, COMM 392, and consent of faculty.

COMM 497. Broadcast Practicum. 4 Hours.

Internship in the mass communication field allowing the students to put into practice, in a professional setting, those techniques and theories learned in their coursework. Prerequisites: Completion of 40 credits in communications with a 2.75 GRA in major.

COMM 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

CSCI Courses

CSCI 101. Introduction to Computer Science. 3 Hours.

General hardware and software issues such as: terminology, environments. Applications such as: word processing, spreadsheets, databases, Internet usage.

CSCI 110. Foundations of Computer Science. 3 Hours.

Introduction to computer science concepts and terminology including: generic data types, data representation, operating systems and system software, von Neumann architecture, OS and hardware usage, installation and maintenance, cyber security and privacy, and networking concepts.

CSCI 111. Introduction to Web Languages. 4 Hours.

Introduction to programming in a high-level language. Emphasis on problem solving and logical thinking. Design, implementation and testing of programs for small scale problems using elementary data types and control structures using web programming languages. Prerequisites: Student must complete CSCI 101 and ASC 093 with a C or higher in both courses before enrolling in this course.

CSCI 112. Visual Basic and VBA. 4 Hours.

Introduction to programming in the Visual BASIC and Visual Basic Application. Prerequisites: CSCI 111.

CSCI 127. Beginning JAVA. 4 Hours.

An introduction to programming in the Beginning JAVA language. Prerequisite: Student must complete CSCI 120 or have consent of the instructor before enrolling in this class.

CSCI 160. Computer Science I. 4 Hours.

An introduction to computer science, with problem solving algorithm development, and structured programming in a high-level language. Emphasis is on design, code debug, and document programs, using techniques of good programming style. Prerequisites: CSCI 111 and ASC 93 with a C or higher in both courses.

CSCI 161. Computer Science II. 4 Hours.

Object-oriented concepts, terminology and notation. The C++ language is explored including topics such as dynamic memory, exception handling, function and class templates, operator overloading, inheritance, polymorphism, and generic programming with the standard template library. Additional topics may include GUI libraries. Prerequisites: CSCI 160 and MATH 103 with a C or higher in both courses.

CSCI 177. Intermediate JAVA. 4 Hours.

Intermediate level programming in the JAVA language. Prerequisite: CSCI 127.

CSCI 221. Web and Internet Programming. 4 Hours.

Service side programming for the WWW. Emphasis on servlet programming and distributed component programming using API's for object serialization, remote method invocation, database connectivity and XML generation. Prerequisite: CSCI 161 with a C or higher.

CSCI 242. Algorithms & Data Structures I. 4 Hours.

Advanced programming techniques including recursion divide-and-conquer, and backtracking will be considered. Dynamic and static data structures including lists, stacks, and queues. Modular programming, program specification and verification, and analysis of algorithms. Prerequisites: CSCI 161, MATH 107 or both MATH 103 and MATH 105 with a C or higher in all courses.

CSCI 243. Algorithms & Data StructuresII. 4 Hours.

Advanced programming techniques including sorting, binary trees, AVL trees, graphs and networks. A discussion of searching techniques for conceptual graphs and networks and additional searching strategies. Analysis of algorithms will also be presented. Prerequisite: CSCI 242 with a C or higher.

CSCI 260. UNIX Environment. 4 Hours.

An introduction to the UNIX environment. Basic tools and utilities. Shell programming. Prerequisite: CSCI 160.

CSCI 275. Computer and Digital Hardware I. 4 Hours.

Fundamentals of digital systems, data representations, mathematics digital systems, microprocessor design and instruction sets, introduction to laboratory equipment. Prerequisites: CSCI 161, MATH 107 or MATH 103 and MATH 105 with a C or higher in all courses.

CSCI 297. Internship. 1-8 Hour.

Supervised professional work experience in a cyber-technology environment at the 100 & 200 course level. May not be counted towards earned credits for major or minor. Student must have departmental approval before enrolling.

CSCI 299. Special Topics. 1-4 Hour.

Prerequisite: CSCI 101.

CSCI 321. Windows Programming. 4 Hours.

Development of applications for the Windows environment and use of a standard library and its classes. Prerequisite: CSCI 161 with a C or higher.

CSCI 323. Robotics. 4 Hours.

Introduction to robotics emphasis is on the computer design, programming of autonomous robot systems, basic dynamics and control of motion, sensors, and artificial intelligence techniques for robot applications in the real world. Individual and group projects analyze robot control problems, designing hardware, and software solutions. Students write basic control programs for different robot platforms and apply state-of-art artificial intelligence techniques to the control of robotic mechanisms. Prerequisite: CSCI 161 with a C or higher.

CSCI 330. Software Engineering and Testing. 4 Hours.

The principle, methods and models used to develop and manage software projects, including test implementation of a large-scale project. Prerequisite: Student must complete CSCI 161, 275 and 340 with a C or higher before enrolling in this course.

CSCI 331. Social Implications. 4 Hours.

An introduction to: The effects of computer technology (hardware and/or software) on society and individuals; ethical problems faced by computer professionals; human interaction and interfacing with computer technology. Prerequisite: CSCI 161, 275 and 340 or instructor consent.

CSCI 335. Theoretical Computer Science. 4 Hours.

Models of computation, regular expressions, finite automata, Kleene's Theorem, lexical analysis, context-free grammars, pushdown automata, introduction to parsing. Prerequisites: CSCI 242, CSCI 275, MATH 208, and MATH 209 with a C or higher in all courses.

CSCI 340. Computer Networks I. 4 Hours.

Introduction to network design and management. Topics include the local area networks, wireless networks and communication systems, OSI and TCP/IP Models, signals and modulation, protocol designs such as Ethernet, Wifi, Bluetooth, cellular networks, ad hoc networks, flow control, error handling, routing, interfaces, and applications. Prerequisites: CSCI 161, CSCI 275, MATH 107 or MATH 103 and MATH 105, MATH 208, and MATH 209 with a C or higher in all courses.

CSCI 352. Comparative Languages. 4 Hours.

Comparison of procedural and non-procedural languages. Study of strengths and weaknesses of language for solving various problems. Introduction to implementation issues such as memory allocation. Prerequisite: CSCI 242.

CSCI 356. Database Management I. 4 Hours.

Introduction to database management systems, database theory and schema design, and programming, including data modeling, set theory, relational calculus, functional and multivalued data dependencies, and normalization. Various database models are discussed including, relational, NoSQL, network, hierarchical, and inverted files, and database management and security. Prerequisites: CSCI 161 and MATH 209 with a C or higher in all courses or BIT 312 or department approval.

CSCI 360. Systems Programming. 4 Hours.

Programming using interrupts and operating systems services. Device driver implementation. Brief comparison of different hardware systems. Prerequisites: CSCI 242, CSCI 275, MATH 208, and MATH 209 with a C or higher in all courses.

CSCI 370. Computer Organization. 4 Hours.

The structure and organization of computer hardware. Register implementation and usage. Memory management. Comparison of Architectures. Prerequisites: CSCI 161, CSCI 275, MATH 208, and MATH 209 with a C or higher in all courses.

CSCI 375. Computer and Digital Hardware II. 4 Hours.

Advanced applications of digital systems, builds on the content of CSCI 275, emphasis on system designs. Prerequisite: CSCI 275.

CSCI 391. Teaching Computer Science. 2 Hours.

Classroom management and equipment. Analysis of student diffuculties, survey of current literature, observation, and practicum. Prerequisites: CSCI 160, 250 and admission to Teacher Education.

CSCI 440. Data Communications & Computer Security. 4 Hours.

Network administration and management of data protocols and models, basic configurations, software, hardware, and routing applications. Problems of computer security and possible solutions, internet security, secure operation system and kernels, with an emphasis on applications. Prerequisite: CSCI 340 with a C or higher.

CSCI 450. Operating Systems. 4 Hours.

Design and implementation of operating systems. Study of the control of and communication between interacting processes. Resource allocation and management in a multiprogramming environment. Prerequisites: CSCI 360 and CSCI 370 with a C or higher in both courses.

CSCI 452. Compiler & Interpreter Construction. 4 Hours.

Theory and practice of program translation. Lexical and syntactic analysis, error detection and response, optimization. Prerequisites: CSCI 275 and CSCI 335 with a C or better in both courses.

CSCI 456. Database Management II. 4 Hours.

Advanced database theory and applications. Students will be expected to have a solid foundations in normalization and database programming. Students will be expected to apply their knowledge of set theory, relational calculus and normalization to design and develop a large database project in a relational database system and create an application which uses the database in the programming language of their choice from a large data set. Prerequisite: CSCI 356 with a C or higher.

CSCI 458. Computer & Network Security. 4 Hours.

Introduction to computer and network security. Topics covered include the CIA triad model, symmetric and public-key encryption algorithms, hashing algorithms, and securing data storage, application and communications systems, firewalls, penetration testing, vulnerability assessments, reverse engineering, malware and ethics. Prerequisites: CSCI 340 and CSCI 370 with a C or higher in both courses.

CSCI 460. Capstone Project. 4 Hours.

The student chooses a research or software development project in consultation with the instructor. The student prepares a project proposal discussing the scope of the project and develops it to those specifications. On completion of the project the student is expected to present the results of their work and submit a final report. It is recommended that the project is focused on student's chosen field of study. Prerequisites: CSCI 242, CSCI 340, CSCI 356, and CSCI 370 with a C or higher in all courses.

CSCI 497. Internship. 1-8 Hour.

Supervised professional experience in computing applications. A maximim of two credits may be counted toward a major or minor. May be repeated up to a total of eight credits. Grading is pass/fail. Prerequisite: Departmental Approval.

ECON Courses

ECON 201. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Hours.

Supply and demand, price and output determination in the product and resource markets, consumer demand, elasticity, costs and profits, and intentional trade.

ECON 202. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Hours.

Nature, method, and scope of economic analysis; nature of economic growth; inflationary tendencies and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policies, international finance. (May be taken before 201.).

ECON 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

ECON 312. Price Theory. 3 Hours.

Analysis of individual consumer demand, principles of production, costs, pricing and output decisions under different market structures. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201.

ECON 314. National Income Analysis. 3 Hours.

Study of major movements in national income, production, employment, price levels, as well as policy related to growth and equilibrium. Prerequisite(s): ECON 202.

ECON 315. Labor Economics. 3 Hours.

Survey of labor-management relations that examines the policies and objectives of labor unions history and government, organizing, and bargaining, economics of the labor market and wage determination, government control and major laws that affect labor-management relations. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202.

ECON 318. Money and Banking. 3 Hours.

Nature and function of U.S. depository institutions (especially commercial banks, saving and loans, and credit unions); their regulation with particular emphasis on the Federal Reserve System's monetary policy and instruments of control and an introduction to monetary theory. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202.

ECON 320. Environ and Nat Resource Econ. 3 Hours.

This class engages students in standard economic theory through the lens of environmental issues such as global climate change and overpopulation. The approach of this class combines traditional microeconomic analysis with a detailed examination of macro-level ecological problems that require local, national, and global policy solutions. It discusses how to utilize natural resources efficiently and issues related to the usage of natural resources. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201.

ECON 394. Independent Study General Econ. 1-4 Hour.

ECON 410. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

Managerial Economics is an application of the part of Microeconomics that focuses on the topics that are of greatest interest and importance to managers. The purpose of learning this subject is to help managers make better decisions. Topics include demand and cost analysis, market structure, pricing decision, and government regulations. Some powerful analytical tools such as regression analysis, business forecasting, and linear programming will also be covered to assist the decision making process. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202.

ECON 414. International Economics. 3 Hours.

Study of the causes fo international trade, classical and neoclassical models of international trade, the movement fo money, goods, and factors fo production over national boundaries, role of trade barriers and balance of payments. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202.

ECON 418. History of Economic Thought. 3 Hours.

Study of evolution of economic thought under different social and political background, like mercantilism, physiocracy, classical economies, historical school and Socialist doctrines. Prerequisites: ECON 201 or 202.

ECON 419. Economic Planning & Development. 3 Hours.

Study of basic techniques and methods in planning which facilitate various levels of economic development. The application of the planning strategies necessary to effect desirable economic development is also undertaken. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202.

ECON 421. International Energy Markets. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the International Energy Markets. It will examine energy industry market structure and how it relates to business decision making. The course will provide fundamental economic knowledge needed to implement decisions related to the energy industry. It will review supply and demand structures of the energy market as well as various energy forecasting methodologies. The course will use energy data analysis methodology as a tool for analyzing future energy requirements. Prerequisites: ECON 320 and 312.

ECON 494. Independent Study Honors Econ. 1-8 Hour.

ECON 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

ED Courses

ED 221. Diagnostic Teaching. 1 Hour.

This course provides an introduction to the concept and practice of diagnostic teaching and data driven instruction. Candidates will apply these principles and practices in a 30 hour tutoring experience.

ED 250. Foundations of Education. 2 Hours.

Study of the historical, philosophical, sociological, concepts that have impated the development of American public schools. Includes an orientation to the teaching profession and a field experience.

ED 250H. Foundations of Education. 2-3 Hour.

Study of the historical, philosophical and sociological concepts that have impacted the development of American public schools. Includes an orientation to the teaching professional and a field experience Pre-requisite: acceptance into the Honors Program and must be of sophomore, junior or senior status.

ED 260. Educational Psychology. 2 Hours.

Emphasis learning theory, effective teaching, classroom management and child development as applied to educational settings.

ED 260H. Educational Psychology. 2 Hours.

Emphasizes learning theory, effective teaching, classroom management and child development as applied to educational settings. Pre-requisite: Admitted to the Honor Program and of sophomore, junior or senior status.

ED 260L. Clinical I. 0 Hours.

The initial level clinical within the teacher education program provides candidates with 20 hours of observations in schools related to their major and the content in educational psychology. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Students must be enrolled in or have completed ED 260 before enrolling in this course.

ED 282. Managing the Learning Environment. 2 Hours.

Strategies for successfully creating a positive learning environment in the classroom; strategies for dealing with the disruptive student, strategies for creating positive parental involvement in student learning.

ED 282L. Clinical II. 0.5 Hours.

This entry level clinical provides candidates with 12 hours of experience in a variety of support programs and services in educational settings.

ED 284. Teaching Diverse Learners. 2 Hours.

Adapting teaching strategies to culture, ethnic, linguistic, developmental, and physical differences in the classroom. Collaborating with related professions in individualizing instruction.

ED 284L. Clinical III. 0.5 Hours.

This entry level clinical experience provides candidates with 30 hours of engagement with professional organizations and service learning in projects related to education in schools and the community.

ED 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

ED 299A. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

ED 320. Curriculum, Planning & Assessment I. 2 Hours.

The development of curriculum for the public schools and strategies for the planning, delivery, and assessment of instruction. Prerequisite: ED 260.

ED 321L. Clinical IV. 0.5 Hours.

This mid-level clinical experience provides students in teacher education with an extended experience in school working on academic interventions with small groups of students.

ED 322. Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment II. 2 Hours.

The development of assessment processes and tools based on the reciprocal relationship between instruction and assessment, with a focus on data driven interventions and instruction. Prerequisite: Students must complete ED 320 before enrolling in this course.

ED 323L. Clinical V. 0.5 Hours.

This mid-level clinical experience provides students in teacher education with an extended experience in a school working on academic interventions with small groups of students and designing appropriate assessments. Prerequisite: ED 320.

ED 324L. Fall Experience. 0 Hours.

This mid-level clinical experience provides students in teacher education with an extended experience in the fall semester observing and assisting with beginning of the year room design, organization, and classroom management policies and procedures.

ED 350. Middle School Philosophy & Curriculum. 3 Hours.

Acquaints students with the philosophy of middle school education and current practices in middle school curriculum, instrucation, and assessment. Prerequisites: ED 320.

ED 380. Technology in Teaching. 2 Hours.

Strategies for the instructional uses of technology including multimedia presentation, e-mail, internet, spreadsheets, data bases, and emerging technologies. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education or CD major and ED 320.

ED 394. Independent Study In Education. 1-4 Hour.

ED 402. Content Area & Develop Reading. 3 Hours.

The study of teaching reading at elementary, middle school, and high levels; ways of responding to literature and other written materials, content area reading for different purposes, application of strategies and study skills, and use of a variety of performance assessments. Prerequisite: Student must complete ED 320 before enrolling in this class.

ED 440. Remedial Reading. 3 Hours.

Diagnosis and treatment of children with reading difficulties. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and ED 352.

ED 441. Clinical Practice in Remedial Reading. 3 Hours.

Supervised practice in a clinical remedial reading situation. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and ED 440.

ED 451. Middle School Teaching Strategies. 3 Hours.

Designed to develop the skills and teaching strategies to implement a middle school program. Stresses teaming, thematic curriculum development, advising, and working with parents. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320.

ED 480. Clinical Practicum in Education. 1-5 Hour.

This course in designed to give education majors an opportunity to have 30 hours of practical experience. Placements in schools settings are arranged by the Teacher Advisement and Field Placement office. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, a methods class, and departmental approval.

ED 482. Student Teaching Seminar. 2 Hours.

This seminar will provide support to candidates as they complete the final phase of their teacher education program. Topics relevant to student teaching will be discussed. Corequisite: Students must be enrolled in either ED 491, 492, 493, 494, or 495 at the same time as this course.

ED 483. Student Teaching Seminar. 2 Hours.

This seminar will provide support to candidates as they complete the final phase of their teacher education program. Topics relevant to student teaching will be explored including classroom management, diversity, technology, instructional strategies, assessment, and data driven instruction. Corequisite: Students must be enrolled in either ED 491, 492, 493, 494, or 495 at the same time as this course.

ED 484. Student Teaching Seminar. 2 Hours.

This seminar will provide support to candidates as they complete the final phase of their teacher education program. Topics relevant to student teaching will be explored including classroom management, diversity, technology, instructional strategies, assessment, and data driven instruction. Corequisite: Students must be enrolled in either ED 491, 492, 493, 494, or 495 at the same time as this course.

ED 491. Student Teaching Kindergarten. 4-16 Hour.

Supervised teaching in kindergarten. Prerequisites: Recommendation by advisor, division/department chairperson, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other requires education coursework.

ED 492. Student Teaching, Elementary. 4-16 Hour.

Supervised teaching in elementary schools. Prerequisites: Recommendation by advisor, division/department chairperson, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other requires education coursework.

ED 493. Student Teaching, Secondary. 4-16 Hour.

Supervised teaching in secondary schools. Prerequisites: Recommendation by advisor, division/department chairperson, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other requires education coursework.

ED 494. Student Teaching K-12. 4-16 Hour.

Supervised teaching in both elementary and secondary levels in resticted areas. Prerequisites: Recommendation by advisor, division/department chairperson, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other requires education coursework.

ED 495. Student Teaching, Special Areas. 4-16 Hour.

Supervised teaching in special areas: mentally handicapped and education of the deaf. Recommendation by advisor, division/department chairperson, and TEAC; admission to Teacher Education; and completion of all other required education coursework.

ED 497. Mentored Clinical Practice. 5-16 Hour.

This course if designed to provide a one year mentored clinical internship for classroom teachers. Prerequisites include departmental approval and emergency licensure by the Educational Standards and Practices Board of North Dakota.

ED 499. Independent Study Honors Ed. 1-8 Hour.

ENGL Courses

ENGL 110. College Composition I. 3 Hours.

Guided pratice in college-level reading, writing, and critical thinking. Emphasis on writing processes, and on approaches to critical reading. Does not apply toward the English major. Prerequisite: Students must complete ASC 87, have an ACT test score of at least 18, COMPASS test score of at least 77, an SAT test score of at least 430, an ACCUPLACER test score of at least 5, or a PLAN test score of at least 15.

ENGL 111H. Honors Composition I. 3 Hours.

The first course in the honors curriculum, ENGL 111 takes the place of ENGL 110 and, if the student continues in the Honors Program, COMM 110 is required of all Honors Students earning a BSE degree. The course is reading intensive and encourages intellectual independence. Admission to the Honors Program is not a prerequisite, but ACT scores of 25 in reading and writing are required. Does not apply to the English major.

ENGL 120. College Composition II. 3 Hours.

Advanced practice in college-level writing from sources and in applying rhetorical strategies. Emphases in rhetorical strategies and incorporating research in academic writing. Does not apply toward the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 110.

ENGL 121H. Honors Composition II. 3 Hours.

The second course taken in the honors curriculum. Replaces ENGL120 in the general education program. Independent research and writing focuses in a rigorous study of literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 110 or 111H; admission to Honors Program or permission of the Honors Director. Does not apply toward the English major.

ENGL 191. English Community Seminar. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to be taken the spring following a student's declaration of an English or English Education major. The community seminar is an introduction to the English community at Minot State. Students will learn the many different areas of research within the field of English studies, become aware of club and academic opportunities within the department, and practice community building. Prerequisite: Students must be an English or and English Education major before enrolling in this course.

ENGL 209. Introduction to Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Entry level knowledge for the scientific study of language, including such topics as phonology, semantics, grammar, and related cultural history.

ENGL 211. Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 Hours.

Study and practice in writing techniques and strategies employed by writers in various genres, including fiction/creative nonfiction/poetry/teleplay/drama. Focus on developing skills in manipulating point of view, creating figurative language, writing realistic dialogue, developing themes and characters, and honing style to suit various audiences and genres. Read for craft by examining and analyzing the work of successful writers in various genres.

ENGL 220. Introduction to Literature. 3 Hours.

Reading and discussion of literary forms such as the short story, the novel, poetry, and drama, with emphasis on common literary terminology. Does not count toward the English major/minor.

ENGL 225. Introduction to Film. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the aesthetic, technical, and social significance of selected films, with emphasis on understanding basic film vocabulary and narrative structure. Four studio hours per week.

ENGL 227. Survey of Creative Nonfiction. 3 Hours.

This introductory survey course provides exposure to reading and analyzing a variety of creative nonfiction including reportage, criticism and commentary, memoir, and the personal essay to explore how the genre can be both honest and creative. Students will examine the use of voice, subjectivity, emotion, speculation, memory, humor, imagination, and the complicated idea of truth in nonfiction literature in its various forms, and discuss how nonfiction is conceived and constructed.

ENGL 231. Bible as Literature. 3 Hours.

Study of the Bible from a literary point of view.

ENGL 231H. Bible As Literature. 3 Hours.

ENGL 232. World Mythology. 3 Hours.

The study of representative myths, legends, and folklore from various cultures with emphasis upon the literary aspects of myth.

ENGL 238. Children's Literature. 3 Hours.

Introductory study of picture books and poetry; folk tales, fairy tales, myth, and legend; modern fiction, both realistic and imaginary, historical fiction, and biographical and informational books for children.

ENGL 240. World Literature. 3 Hours.

Study of diverse and significant literary texts in a variety of genres from antiquity to the present from a wide variety of cultures and nationalities in terms of their aesthetic quality, cultural values, and historical periods.

ENGL 251. Foundations in Brit Lit I. 3 Hours.

A survey of British literature from the Anglo Saxon period through the 18th century. Prerequisite: ENGL 110.

ENGL 252. Foundations in Brit Lit II. 3 Hours.

A continuing survey of British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 110.

ENGL 261. Foundations in Am Lit I. 3 Hours.

A survey of American literature from the pre-Colombian aboriginal literature through the mid-nineteenth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 110.

ENGL 262. Foundations in Am Lit II. 3 Hours.

A survey of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 110.

ENGL 265. Native American Literature. 3 Hours.

The study of Native American Indian legends, poems, and stories with emphasis on contemporary writings.

ENGL 270. Introduction to Literary Criticism. 3 Hours.

The study of methods and assumptions of literary criticism, the reasons for and values fo literary studies, and the formal academic discourse employed in English. Course serves as an introduction to the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 110.

ENGL 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

ENGL 311. Contemporary American Poetry. 3 Hours.

This course explores the most exciting developments in American poetry from 1950 until the present. We will consider a wide array of poetic movements-the Beats, the New York School, Confessionalism, the San Francisco Renaissance, The Black Mountain group, the New Formalists, and the Language poets-in order to understand the aesthetic tendencies that inform American poetries being written today. In particular, we will examine key individual poets through close readings of their most exemplary work and how that work is emblematic of the social and historical milieu in which the poems were written.

ENGL 315. Profes and Tech Writing. 3 Hours.

Concentrated instruction and practice in technical and job-related expository writing.

ENGL 317. Teaching Writing. 3 Hours.

Study of methods of teaching writing with emphasis on contemporary theories. Prerequisite: ENGL 120.

ENGL 318. Writing Tutor Training. 1 Hour.

The course covers practices and theories for tutoring writers. Content includes the composing process, diagnosing problems, establishing rapport, managing research and helping with second language needs. Prerequisite: ENGL 120.

ENGL 318L. Supervised Writing Tutoring. 0 Hours.

Supervised tutoring experience in the Writing Center (20 hours). Prerequisites: Student must complete ENGL 110 and 120 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite or Corequisite: be enrolled or have completed ENGL 318 before enrolling in this class.

ENGL 321. Topics in Creative Writing. 3 Hours.

This themed, team-taught creative writing course allows students further practice across genres of creative writing before entering advanced, genre-specific workshop courses. Themes and topics will change yearly to inspire students to explore new writing styles within the discipline and also gain exposure to diverse voices in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

ENGL 322. Am Dialects in Lit and Media. 3 Hours.

Examines American regional dialects (e.g. African American English, Chicano English, Appalachian English) and how those dialects are represented in literature and media. Students will explore the history, development, and linguistic features of various dialects, then they will read literature and watch films that make us of those dialects. Students will evaluate the effects of authentic and stereotypical representations of dialects on audience with an eye to exploring how these representations reflect attitudes towards dialects in America.

ENGL 324. Rhetoric of Everyday Life. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to modern rhetorical theory and the application of mid to late twentieth-century theories in analyzing, exploring, and interpreting our everyday experiences. In this course, students will continue the ongoing conversations of how we are influenced by the persuasive messages (written and performed) surrounding us in our cultures through rhetorical theories and how our personal histories influence the messages we receive.

ENGL 326. American Apocalyptic Lit. 3 Hours.

This course traces apocalyptic literature in the Americas from the Spanish explorers and Puritan settlers through to the twenty-first century. Students will read literature in a variety of genres and explore how both imagery and narrative tactics are critical in apocalyptic literature. Students will also explore how apocalyptic literature has indelibly marked American culture, politics, and social rhetoric. This course is a literary and cultural study course, not a religion or theology course.

ENGL 329. Coming of Age Literature. 3 Hours.

Students will discuss films and novels in which the main characters grow up. The texts' themes may include, but are not limited to, acculturation, appearance and reality, crime and punishment, death ecology, education, emotional and physical change, friendship, gender roles, human sexuality, individuals and institutions, individuals and society, love, race and ethnic relations, search for meaning, and spirituality. Students will select some of the texts through class vote.

ENGL 331. Ethnicity and Identity Search. 3 Hours.

The identity struggle that persons of specific ethnic backgrounds encounter in their cultural contexts. Texts (including films) and topics may vary and the ethnic focus may either be comparative or selective.

ENGL 334. Film Directors. 3 Hours.

According to the auteur theory, some directors are the dominant creators of their films. In the seminar we'll read selected materials about several major directors, view several films by each director, and identify and discuss the recurrent patterns, techniques, and meanings that are the directors' individual signatures.

ENGL 335. Film Genres. 3 Hours.

Films are commonly classified into broad categories, or genres, including action, war, western, comedy, science fiction, mystery/suspense, horror, drama, and family. In this seminar we'll discuss aesthetic conventions, content, cultural contexts, and socio-historical significance of films in three genres. We'll view nine or ten major films in total and we'll read selected materials.

ENGL 338. Topics in Adolescent Lit. 3 Hours.

Literature written for teenagers (ages fourteen through eighteen) is uniquely positioned because it addresses the emotional and social issues and fears unique to adolescence. In this course, students will read a variety of literature written for teens and through this literature, explore topics such as race, family, technology, and coming of age. Specific topics will vary each time the course is offered, but students will explore how writers attempt to address the concerns and problems of adolescents in an increasingly complex society.

ENGL 339. Topics in African Lit. 3 Hours.

The enormous effects of cultural change upon the Dark Continent will be studied through post-colonial African writers ranging from Chinua Achebe to V.S. Naipul. The course will continue with a study of contemporary African authors and literature.

ENGL 342. Gendered Literature. 3 Hours.

This course will explore through literature how gender intersects with other identity categories such as sex, class, sexuality, and race in shaping authorship, reading, and representation. Course materials will span time periods, cultures, and countries to investigate an array of experiences that interrogate concepts of gender. Through the course of the semester, students will explore the gender continuum, covering hegemonic masculinity, exaggerated femininity, and all the shades in between.

ENGL 343. Graphic Novels as Lit. 3 Hours.

Graphic novels have been labeled as "comics" and "pop" culture, unworthy of study; however, graphic novels are rising in popularity and prestige in this course, students will explore the evolution of the graphic novel, from its earliest forms through the present day, including stand alone novels and retellings of classical literature. Students will examine the ways in which artwork, narration, and dialogue interact to produce a hybrid piece of literature and will have the opportunity to write their own graphic novel manuscripts.

ENGL 345. American Noir. 3 Hours.

What used to be considered a sub-genre of detective or crime fiction, noir is more and more understood as a sub-genre of American modernism. Criminal and other "outsider" activity or behavior often drives the plot of noir fiction and film; however, this literature serves as the vehicle by which we can understand issues central to modern and contemporary (and literary) American life - issues such as class, race, gender, sexuality, sense of place, and/or belonging, moral codes, psychological well-being, achievement and success, and narrative style. Noir, then, develops and modifies popular literary and cultural formulas to address genuine social and aesthetic problems, and thus deserves the intense, focused analysis of this literature course.

ENGL 348. Language Arts for the Writer. 3 Hours.

The craft of writing with style is developed through the study of language arts and the close reading of a writer's (or writers') use of words, sentences, paragraphs, narration, characters, dialogue, details, and gestures. Personal selection of a writer by students.

ENGL 349. Chinese and Japanese Literature. 3 Hours.

This course will explore significant developments in Chinese and Japanese literature and art, as well as like developments amongst Asian minority groups, all discussed in their relationship to the literature of our own time and place. Includes works by Chinese T'ang poets and the creators of Japanese Noh Theater, among others.

ENGL 350. Literature of the Last Twenty Years. 3 Hours.

In this course students will read a selection of text written in the last twenty years in order to explore the place of recent text and literary trends within the study of literature. The course will offer a global perspective by featuring text from across the English speaking world. Students will think critically about the types of literature they have seen being widely distributed, adapted, and read during their lifetimes.

ENGL 355. Age of Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

Study of representative works of Shakespeare. Prerequisite: ENGL 110.

ENGL 357. Studies in Nineteenth Century American Literature and Culture. 3 Hours.

This course explores American literature of various kinds from the Revolutionary period, through slavery and Reconstruction, until the first wave of feminism (roughly 1770-1900). As literature reflects cultures, concerns, and issues, this textual study will allow readers multiple perspectives on struggles and triumphs throughout the period.

ENGL 358. Literature of the Upper Great Plains. 3 Hours.

Students will explore literature written in first-person about experiences of settling and of homesteading in the Upper Great Plains. Other accounts will be from children's perspectives of that was produced years after the fact. While much of the literature will be realism, some fiction will also be read for contrast. Students will compare accounts written by women and men, between Canada and Nebraska, between early nineteenth century and late twentieth century.

ENGL 359. Literature of the Wild. 3 Hours.

This course not only provides students with a focused way of examining how American nature writers have framed human interactions with the natural environment and how these writings are relevant to current ecological problems and issues, but it also asks that they inquire how cultural values have shaped our definitions of nature, our perceptions of and relationships to the natural environment, and our political priorities relative to the kinds of environmental problems and solutions that we address in the United States.

ENGL 360. Love, Lust, and Loss in Western Literature: The Pastoral, Elegiac, and Courtly Traditions. 3 Hours.

This course explores the development of literary traditions of love of Ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval, Renaissance, and Romantic English Literature, and its pertinence to love traditions of our own time. The course further considers two interesting corollaries of the literary love traditions: strange sex and weird spirituality.

ENGL 363. Magical Realism. 3 Hours.

Magical realism is a loosely defined and broadly descriptive genre in which natural laws are occasionally stretched or ignored. In this course students will explore the genre's range and variety. The reading and viewing lists will emphasize Mexican and Latin American novels and films. Students will explore the themes, characteristics, objectives, and attitudes of magical realism in order to better understand the genre's focus on the mysteriousness or everyday real.

ENGL 365. Media English. 3 Hours.

Methods for incorporating the production, editing, and publishing of computer-based media into the English classroom are developed by using computer graphics, video recorders, Google docs, pods, blogs, social networks, and other net tools.

ENGL 367. Media Literacy. 3 Hours.

In order to address the increasingly visual and digital demands of our culture and the citizen it produces, this course will explicitly deal with the dissemination of information and culture via different forms of popular media. Based on the idea that everything produced by our culture is readable text, students will read and produce both traditional and non-traditional texts in a variety of media. Students will also explore how different media changes, how we process information and the impact they have on important concepts such as identity, self, culture, community, authority, and argument.

ENGL 368. Place in Detective Fiction. 3 Hours.

From Sam Spade's San Francisco to Spenser's Boston to V.I. Warshawski's Chicago, place plays a huge role in the detective novel, often becoming a character itself. This course will examine the role of place, both real and invented, in detective novels and films. Students will read detective fiction and watch several films and through this, they will examine how the place in which a detective operates affects the unfolding of the mystery and the detective's attempts to find out "whodunit.".

ENGL 373. World Drama. 3 Hours.

Study of diverse and significant dramatic texts from antiquity to the present from a wide variety of cultures and nationalities in terms of their aesthetic quality, cultural values, and historical periods.

ENGL 374. Reading the Built Environment. 3 Hours.

With over three-quarters of America's population now living in cities, the dynamic between humans and the environment has shifted away from the natural to the built. This course will explore the varied interactions between cities/towns and the people who live there. Students will read literary and spatial texts in order to challenge the definition and experience of community and how it changes and adapts depending on the built environment that surrounds it - the spaces where cities bleed into one another, where nature has reasserted itself within the city, or where previously vibrant small towns and city centers stagnate.

ENGL 376. The American Century: American Literature and Culture in the Twentieth Century. 3 Hours.

In this course, students will read literature produced by twentieth-century American writers, and through it explore issues of race, class, gender, and region or place. Students will also study the critical theories and aesthetic movements associated with the terms modernism and postmodernism. Students will also investigate how literature and culture intersect and inform one another.

ENGL 378. The Modernists. 3 Hours.

This course examines that crazy experimental time in early twentieth century arts and letters when the idea of form explodes, creating all kinds of new literary and aesthetic models that changed our world. Includes works by T. S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, William Butler Yeats, Virginia Wolf, Henry Green, Ezra Pound, and others, situated in the historic context of the two World Wars.

ENGL 383. Topics in Black American Literature. 3 Hours.

This course includes both fiction and non-fiction with readings from oral traditions and slavery to that of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics may focus on slavery, legal cases, migrations, language (dialect to rap) or other topics. We will explore the relationships between Black Americans and hegemonic groups, and the impact of African-Americans/Blacks upon the people and cultures of America.

ENGL 385. Tracking the Sword in the Stone: Arthurian Legend Then and Now. 3 Hours.

This course examines the development of Arthurian Legend from its sixth century British origins through the European Middle Ages and unto the present day, for Arthur, they say, is still among us.

ENGL 389. Warriors, Marchers, and Martyrs. 3 Hours.

The literature of collisions are studied, whether those collisions are political, military, cultural, racial, economic, religious, environmental, gendered, or sexual oppressions or crises. Texts (including films) and topics may vary.

ENGL 390. Secondary Language Arts Methods. 4 Hours.

Theory and practice in teaching literature, composition, and language in the secondary school. Includes practicum. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

ENGL 391. Junior Research Seminar. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to be completed the spring semester prior to Senior Seminar (ENGL 491). In this research seminar, students will begin the research process for their senior seminar paper, select a second reader within the English department, and craft a research proposal and annotated bibliography pertaining to their research paper for Senior Seminar. Prerequisite: Students must be an English or an English Education major before enrolling in this course.

ENGL 397. Internship. 1-6 Hour.

Hands-on experience in the discipline. Placement determined at time of internship. May be repeated as desired. Prerequisite: Restricted to students who are English or English Education majors.

ENGL 399. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

ENGL 410. Fiction Workshop. 3 Hours.

Concentrated instruction and practice in writing fiction.

ENGL 411. Poetry Workshop. 3 Hours.

Concentrated instruction and practice in writing poetry.

ENGL 412. Creative Nonfiction Workshop. 3 Hours.

Concentrated instruction and practice in writing creative nonfiction.

ENGL 435. Major Writers. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of selected literary works by major authors. Authors and selections will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisites: ENGL 120 and one 300-level English course or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as content changes.

ENGL 470. Advanced Seminar in Literary Criticism. 3 Hours.

Intensive exploration of one school (or related schools) of modern literary theory. Focus will be on primary works of criticism, not literature. May repeat for credit as content changes. Prerequisite: ENGL 270.

ENGL 491. Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of literary issues. Serves as capstone course for English degree. Prerequisites: ENGL 120, 191, 391, and senior status. Course restricted to majors.

ENGL 494. Independent Study Honors Eng. 1-8 Hour.

ENGL 496. Study Abroad. 1-6 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. Does not count toward English major/minor/BSE.

ENGL 497. Internship. 4-12 Hour.

Hands-on experience in the discipline. Placement determined at time of internship. May be repeated as desired. Prerequisite: Restricted to students who are English or English Education majors or have the consent of the instructor.

ENGL 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

FREN Courses

FREN 101. Beginning French I. 4 Hours.

For beginners or those entering with one or two years of high school French. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture.

FREN 102. Beginning French II. 4 Hours.

A continuation of Beginning French I. Prerequisite: FREN 101.

FREN 194. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of French. Pre-requisite: French or French Education major or minor.

FREN 201. Intermediate French I. 4 Hours.

Review of basic French with increased practice in conversation, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: FREN 102, three years of high school French or consent of instructor.

FREN 202. Intermediate French II. 4 Hours.

Continuation of FREN 201. Prerequisite: FREN 201.

FREN 220. French Film. 3 Hours.

An exploration of socio-cultural, historical, and political issues in French film. Supplementary readings on modern French art and literature in English translation. Taught in English.

FREN 296. Study Tour. 1-3 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. Does not count towards the French or French Education major or minor.

FREN 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of French language, literature, culture, and civilization. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

FREN 304. Introduction to French Literature. 3 Hours.

Designed to improve language shills with an emphasis on reading and to enhance the student's ability to understand literature. Includes study of poetry, drama, and narrative from the French-speaking world. Prerequisite: FREN 202 or consent of instructor.

FREN 340. Conversation & Composition I. 3 Hours.

The first of a year long sequence focusing on advanced practice in oral and written skills using cultural readings and other media. Prerequisite: Student must complete FREN 202 before enrolling in this class.

FREN 341. Conversation & Composition II. 3 Hours.

The second of a year long sequence focusing on advanced practice in oral and written skills using cultural readings and other media. Prerequisite: Students must take FREN 202 or consent of instructor before enrolling in this class.

FREN 343. Contemporary Culture of the French-Speaking World. 3 Hours.

Readings in culture and society from the French-speaking world.

FREN 394. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of French. Pre-requisite: French or French Education major or minor.

FREN 395. Service Learning. 3 Hours.

Student will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate (a) personal community or global service experience(s). Pre-requisite: French or French Education major or minor.

FREN 399. Special Topics. 1-3 Hour.

Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of French. Pre-requisite: French or French Education major or minor.

FREN 401. Advanced Topics in French. 3 Hours.

Topics will vary from year to year depending on student backgrounds and needs.

FREN 402. Genres or Periods French Literature. 3 Hours.

Study of a major genre or period in French literature. Topics varies from year to year.

FREN 403. Senior Thesis In French. 3 Hours.

FREN 450. Senior Capstone Project in French. 3 Hours.

Individual research project on a cultural topic approved by the instructor on semester prior to enrollment in the course. Course is restricted to majors.

FREN 496. Study Tour. 1-18 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyound travel itself. May be repeated for credit. May count towards the French minor.

GEOG Courses

GEOG 110. Introduction to Geography. 3 Hours.

Study of geography in a modern context and its synthesizing role in relation to both physical and social sciences. Major emphasis is on the relationships between people and their environment, spatial interactions, and regional structures.

GEOG 161. World Regional Geography. 3 Hours.

A survey of the world's geographic regions. Focus on the location of Earth's major physical features, human populations, cultures, and their interaction.

GEOG 261. Countries and Cultures. 3 Hours.

The course presents countries of the world through the experiences of MSU faculty native to these countries. The principal objectives are: 1) to illustrate the immense diversity of world countries and cultures, 2) to facilitate the students' understanding and appreciation of the world cultures, 3) to motivate students to learn more about other countries and cultures, 4) to help students to become citizens of the world, 5) to increase marketability of MSU students on the global job market.

GEOG 262. North America. 3 Hours.

A thematic and regional approach to the geography of North America that stresses human patterns and relationships woth the physical environment. Pre-Req: GEOG 110 and GEOG 161.

GEOG 263. North Dakota. 3 Hours.

Study of the interrelationship that exists between North Dakota's physical and cultural environments. Specific topics include physiography, climate, flora, prehistoric occupation, historic development, demography, and economic structures. Pre-Req: GEOG 110 and GEOG 161.

GEOG 264. Geography of Africa. 3 Hours.

Study of the natural regions of Africa with emphasis on the climate, physical and human resources, trade, culture, and their effects upon world affairs.

GEOG 265. Geography of Asia. 3 Hours.

A regional study of Asia with special emphasis on Central, South, East, and Southeast Asia. A study of the natural and cultural regions with emphasis on the climate, physical and human resources, trade, culture, and their effects upon world affairs.

GEOG 266. Latin America and the Caribbean. 3 Hours.

A general overview of an extremely diverse region that is the product of both physical and cultural factors which have interacted over time to produce a unique landscape.

GEOG 267. Geography of Europe. 3 Hours.

A study of Europe's environmental and cultural geography with emphasis on its environmental regions, current Supranational union, and nationalistic divisions.

GEOG 268. Geography of the Middle East. 3 Hours.

An investigation of the natural, political, and historical regions of Southwestern Asia, the Levant, and the Saudi Peninsula. International political linkages, economic implications of oil, environmental opportunities and limitations, and cultural landscapes are emphasized.

GEOG 289. Introduction to GIS. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to theory and techniques of geographic information systems (GIS), which includes the discovery, management, analysis, and display of spatial data. GIS is a valuable too in disciplines that deal with spatial data, including geography, history, field or environmental sciences, epidemiology, economics, and business. This course is equivalent to GEOL 220. Lecture 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOG 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

GEOG 330. Geography of Weather & Climate. 3 Hours.

The major aspects of meteorology which involves the study of weather conditions will be addressed. Climatology will be treated as the scientific study of the Earth's climates. The dynamics of global climate change will be discussed in detail.

GEOG 340. Human Geography. 3 Hours.

Human Geography: The world will be viewed as a complex interaction between political, economic, social, and cultural systems, illustrative of the changes that occur on the landscape over time.

GEOG 360. Perception of the Environment. 3 Hours.

This seminar will examine attitudes and perceptions people hold of their environment and how landscapes become symbolic in cultural identity. Perceptions of a variety of environments will be studied including plains, mountains, deserts, lakes, rivers, forests, deltas, rural towns, farmscapes, and urban settings. The thematic emphasis will be on how perceptions of landscapes are important to environmental ethics, community identity, and land management.

GEOG 370. Geography of World Tourism. 3 Hours.

A systematic description and analysis of the world's major tourism destination regions including coastal zones, alphine areas, interior lakes, and waterways, cities, and cultural attractions. Geographic and economic factors affecting the development of tourism regions are considered. Pre-Req: GEOG 110 and GEOG 161.

GEOG 380. Cultural Geography. 3 Hours.

As a sub-field within human geography, the seminar will address the human imprint on the physical landscape. The study will focus sharply on describing and analyzing the ways language, religion, economy, government and other cultural phenomena interact in space creating place; basically, how humankind functions spatially.

GEOG 394. Independent Study General Geog. 1-4 Hour.

GEOG 494. Independent Study Honors Geog. 1-8 Hour.

GEOG 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

GEOL Courses

GEOL 101. Environmental Geology with Lab. 4 Hours.

Mankind's interaction with the earth. Major environmental problems facing citizens today including: water resources, energy and mineral resourses, and geologic hazards. Local field trips. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 101H. Honors Enviroment Geology W/Lab. 4 Hours.

Mankind's interaction with the earth. Major environmental problems facing citizens today including: water resources, energy and mineral resources, and geological hazards. Laboratory time will focus on small-scale research projects, in-depth discussions of particular topics including current events, and local field trips. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: Honors Program admission of 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of instructor.

GEOL 105. Physical Geology with lab. 4 Hours.

Earth as a physical body, its structure, composition, and the geologic processes acting on and within the earth. Designed especially for students with a specific interest in geology and for those students contemplating a major in sciences. Field trips. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 106. Historical Geology with lab. 4 Hours.

Earth through time, its origin, history, and the history and evolution of animal and plant life. Laboratory study of fossils, sedimentary rocks, and stratigraphic problems. Field trips. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 108. Earth and Planetary Science. 4 Hours.

An introduction to the physical geology of Earth and astronomy, focusing on our solar system. Earth's materials and structure; internal and surficial processes that work to shape Earth; the history of the Earth. Introduction to astronomy, including the earth's moon, the planets, and minor bodies of our solar system, the sun, and the universe beyond our solar system. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 110. Earth Science by Inquiry. 4 Hours.

This course uses inquiry-based methods to explore observational astronomy and some of the physical principles that shape the earth. Students will explore heat and temperature, magnetism, and optics, as well as the paths of the sun, earth, and moon through space.

GEOL 127. Environmental Earth Systems. 4 Hours.

This course is an introduction to Earth Science with an emphasis on people's connections to environmental issues. Earth science is covered within an Earth systems framework with an emphasis on interactions, now the various Earth systems interact with one another. It also deals with how Earth interacts with people, including how Earth affects people (resources, hazards), and how people affect Earth in both positive and negative ways. An underlying concept in this course is stewardship: how people can live with Earth responsibly, working toward a sustainable future.

GEOL 210. Minerals & Rocks. 3 Hours.

Physical, chemical, structural, adn optical properties of minerals; description and identification of common rock-forming and ore minerals; mineral associations and introduction to classification of common rock types. Field trips. Offered each spring. Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 220. Introduction to GIS. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to theory and techniques of geographic information systems (GIS), which includes the discovery, management, analysis, and display of spatial data. GIS is a valuable tool in disciplines that deal with spatial data, including geography, history, field or environmental sciences, epidemiology, economics, and business. This course is equivalent to GEOG 289. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

GEOL 227. Earth Materials and Analysis. 4 Hours.

A study of earth materials, including minerals, rocks, soil, and water, and the basic processes that relate them. It can be considered essentially a course on the rock cycle (materials and processes), and to some extent the hydrologic cycle, with some emphasis on the methods used to characterize and identify earth materials. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on forensic geology, the use of a variety of laboratory/instrumental techniques to characterize and identify earth materials. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: Students must complete GEOL 127 and CHEM 127 before enrolling in this course.

GEOL 240. Geology of North Dakota. 3 Hours.

Geology of North Dakota for including historical geology of North Dakota and surrounding areas; Precambrian basement rocks; Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks; glacial geology; relationships between geology and physical geography (landforms); and existing and potential economic resources of North Dakota. Weekend field trip(s) required. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 260. Energy Resources. 3 Hours.

A survey of energy resources including fossil fuels, renewable, nuclear and unconventional sources. Emphasis on origin, use and implications of development. 2 hours Lec, 3 hours Lab. Prerequisite: GEOL 105. Offered alternate falls.

GEOL 290. Regional Geology. 3 Hours.

A study of the geology of a particular region in the United States or abroad. Class time involves introduction to the geology and preparation for a field trip to the region. Field trip is typically 10-14 days long and may involve hiking and camping. Special fees required. May be repeated for credit. Lecture, 2 hours, field trip required. Prerequisite: GEOL 101 or GEOL 105 or consent of instructor.

GEOL 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

GEOL 300. Geologic Field Methods. 3 Hours.

Geologic mapping and sampling techniques. Students use basic mapping instruments, gather datam record it while in the field, and construct complete and accurate geologic maps. Offered alternate falls. Lacture, 1 hour; laboratory, 4 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 106 and 210 or consent of instructor.

GEOL 305. Methods in Mineral and Petrology. 2 Hours.

Application of modern laboratory methods to the study of minerals and rocks. Methods include optical and scanning electron microscopy, analysis of bulk materials by ICP-ACES and XRD, and EDX macroanalysis of minerals. Offered alternate fall semesters. Laboratory: 6 hours. Prerequisite: Students must complete GEOL 210 before enrolling in this course.

GEOL 310. Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology. 3 Hours.

Description and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks based on mineralogy, textures, and chemical compostions; study of the origins of rocks through laboratory investigation of suites of related rocks. Field trips. Offered alternate springs. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 305.

GEOL 311. Paleontology. 4 Hours.

Fossilization, classification, evolution, and paleocology. Geologic history and identification of major invertebrates phlya. Laboratory emphasizes fossils indentification. Offered alternate falls. Field trip. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 4 hours. Prerequisiites: GEOL 106 and BIOL 151.

GEOL 320. Oceanography. 3 Hours.

Nature, origin, and evolution of ocean basins and sea water. Sea water chemistry, movement, and ability to support life. Life forms. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 105.

GEOL 321. Hydrogeology. 3 Hours.

Surface water hydrology; runoff and stream flow; groundwater hydroeology: distribution of groundwater, aquifer properties, local and regional groundwater flow, geology of groundwater occurrence; groundwater resource development and management; water law. Offered alternate springs. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 322. Geomorphology. 4 Hours.

Processes that shape the Earth's surface. Effects of rock type, geologic structure, and climate on the formation and evolution of land forms. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 323. Global Climate Change. 3 Hours.

Examination of physical, chemical and biological processes that cause environments to change naturally or under the influence of human activities. Consideration of small watersheds, large lake systems and global atmospheric-ocean systems including meteorological processes. Emphasis on positive and negative feedback in controlling environments and their susceptibility to change. Pre-Requisite: GEOL 101 or GEOL 105 or GEOL 108.

GEOL 331. Soils. 4 Hours.

Principles of soils including formation, properties, and classification. This course includes the use of soils information in environmental applications. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 340. Chemistry of Natural Waters. 4 Hours.

Principles of aqueous chemistry, interactions between water and geologic materials, and the chmical nature of various natural waters; includes both fresh and saline waters found in both surface water environments (streams, lakes, oceans) and subsurface environments (vadose zone and saturated zones). Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210. Co-requisite: CHEM 121.

GEOL 361. Structural Geology. 4 Hours.

Stress, strain, mechanical behavior of rocks; description and interpretation of folds, faults, joints, and foliation; tectonic processes; interpretation of geologic maps and field data. Field trip. Offered alternate springs. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. Prerequisite: GEOL 210.

GEOL 394. Independent Study General Es. 1-4 Hour.

GEOL 410. Advance Earth Science by Inquiry. 4 Hours.

Course involving aiding instructors in Earth Science by Inquiry (GEOL 110). Students will conduct oral interviews with GEOL 110 students during GEOL 110 class to determine their progress. Students will be required to learn plate tectonics and observational astronomy in depth during class preparation periods. Course exposes future secondary science teachers to inquiry methods in earth science and teaches them alternate reasoning methods that can be used at a variety of instructional levels. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOL 411. Field Geology. 6 Hours.

The methods of geology, including the preparation of stratigrphic columns, cross sections and geologic maps integrated woth paleoenvironmental interpretation and structual history. Students must write professional level reports. Offered in summer. Prerequisites: GEOL 361, 471, and consent of instructor.

GEOL 421. Applied Hydrogeology. 3 Hours.

Mass transport in vadose and saturated zones; origin and behavior of inorganic and organic contaminants; investagative techniques; groundwater models; site remediation. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisites: GEOL 321.

GEOL 471. Sedimentation and Stratigraphy. 4 Hours.

Origins, characteristics, and classification of sedimentary rocks. Techniques of study, interpretation of data, lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, and correlation. Offered alternate falls. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: Student must complete GEOL 106 and 210 before enrolling in this class.

GEOL 494. Directed Research in Geology. 1-2 Hour.

Students conduct research under direction of a faculty mentor. The topic and goals are agreed to by student and mentor in writing at the beginning of the research. A requirement for successful completion of a second credit of GEOL 494 on a project is that the student will submit an acceptable draft of a research paper that includes introduction/background, methods, and results. Repeatable for credit.

GEOL 497. Co-Op Practicum. 4-8 Hour.

GEOL 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

GERM Courses

GERM 101. Beginning German I. 4 Hours.

For beginners or those entering with one or two years of high school German. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture.

GERM 102. Beginning German II. 4 Hours.

A continuation of Beginning German I. Prerequisite: GERM 101.

GERM 194. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of German. Pre-requisites: German or German Education major or minor.

GERM 201. Intermediate German I. 4 Hours.

Review of basic German with increased pratice in conversation and reading. Prerequisite: GERM 102, three years of high school German, or consent of instructor.

GERM 202. Intermediate German II. 4 Hours.

Continuation of GERM 201. Prerequisite: GERM 201.

GERM 220. German Film. 3 Hours.

An exploration of socio-cultural, historical and political issues in non-mainstream German film. Supplementary readings on modern German art and literature in English translation. Includes a cross-cultural unit on censorship in the arts during the cold war. Taught in English.

GERM 296. Study Tour. 1-3 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. Does not count towards the German or German Education major or minor.

GERM 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

GERM 340. Conversation & Composition I. 3 Hours.

This is one of a pair of courses focusing on advanced practice in oral and written skills using cultural reading and other media. Prerequisite: Student must complete GERM 202 or have the consent of the instructor before enrolling in this class.

GERM 341. Conversation & Composition II. 3 Hours.

This is one of a pair of courses focusing on advanced practice in oral skills using cultural readings and other media. Prerequisite: Student must complete GERM 202 or have the consent of the instructor before enrolling in this class.

GERM 342. Introduction to German Literature. 3 Hours.

Designed to improve language skills with an emphasis on reading and to enhance the student's ability to understand literature. Includes study of poetry, drama, and narrative from the German-speaking world. Prerequisite: Student must complete GERM 202 or have consent of the instructor before enrolling in this class.

GERM 343. German Culture. 3 Hours.

Readings in culture and society from the German-speaking world.

GERM 394. Independent Study. 1-4 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of German.

GERM 395. Service Learning. 3 Hours.

Students will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate (a) personal community or global service experience(s). Pre-requisiste: German or German Education major or minor.

GERM 399. Special Topics. 1-3 Hour.

Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of German. Pre-requisite: German or German Educaiton major or minor.

GERM 421. Advanced Topics In German. 3 Hours.

GERM 423. Senior Thesis In German. 3 Hours.

GERM 441. Periods in German Literature. 3 Hours.

Study of major genre or period in German literature. Topic varies from year to year. Prerequisite: Students must complete GERM 342 before enrolling in this course.

GERM 450. Senior Capstone Project in German. 3 Hours.

Individual research project on a cultural approved by the instructor on semester prior to enrollment in the course. Course restricted to majors.

GERM 496. Study Tour. 1-18 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. May count towards the German or German Education major or minor.

GERM 499. Special Topics. 1-4 Hour.

Topics will vary from year to year depending on student backgrounds and needs.

GS Courses

GS 225. Intro to Gender/Women's Studies. 3 Hours.

This course provides a general introduction to the wide array of historial, social, economic, and philosophical topics usually included within the boudaries of gender studies, and the methods used to analyze society and culture. Considers the differences between sex and gender by examining the relationships among nature, and masculinity, students will examine the patriarchal structure, feminism, non-hetero-normative sexualities, sexism, and various categories of generated existence. An interdisciplinary collection of texts from literature and theory, social sciences, psychology, pop culture, and film will be utilized.

GS 294. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Directed topics of study.

GS 299. Special Topics in Gender/Women's Studies. 1-6 Hour.

GS 397. Internship: Medieval Fem Forum. 1-3 Hour.

Hands-on experience assisting with the production, editing, and distribution of an international feminist scholarly journal. Admission by application only. May repeat for credit.

GS 494. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Directed topics of study.

GS 499. Special Topics in Gender/Women's Studies. 1-6 Hour.

HIST Courses

HIST 95. Intercultural Experience. 0 Hours.

History 095 creates and/or facilitates intercultural and/or interpersonal experiential opportunities for students. Students will participate in an experience that requires thoughtful and demonstrated engagement.

HIST 101. Western Civilization I. 3 Hours.

A survey of the political, intellectual, social and economic trends of Western Civilization from the Classical Age of the French Revolution.

HIST 102. Western Civilization II. 3 Hours.

A survey of the political, intellectual, social, and economic trends of Western Civilization from the French Revolution to the present.

HIST 103. US History to 1877. 3 Hours.

Survey of U.S. history from Colonial period to the end of Reconstruction.

HIST 104. US History from 1877. 3 Hours.

Survey of U.S. history from the end of Reconstruction to present.

HIST 203. Modernization of Early America. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce students to the major developments in American social, intellectual, and cultural history from discovery through the Civil War. The focus of the course will be on the concept of modernization; why, when, and how was life in America evolving toward those characteristics we consider part of modern life? Central topics will include cultural interaction, daily life, the development of a new society, American exceptionalism, the evolution of American intellectual thought, democratization, social movements, and the development of an American literature. US/T.

HIST 206. Islam And The Muslim World. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the history and culture of the wider Muslim world. In this course we will study three aspects of Islam and the Muslim World: Islam as religion, the 1,400 year history of Muslim civilization in all its diversity, and finally Islam today. NW/T.

HIST 211. World Civilizations to 1500. 3 Hours.

World civilizations begin with earliest histories of organized human life in China, India, Africa, and Mesopotamia and end with Europe's emergence from the Middle Ages around 1500.

HIST 212. World Civilizations Since 1500. 3 Hours.

This course surveys non-Western History between 1500 and the present. It focuses on the continents of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, examining these continents' cultures and histories from their own perspectives. Special emphasis will be placed on religion, organization of societies, continuity and discontinuity of cultures, interaction with Europe and North America, colonialism, and global exchange.

HIST 215H. Modern World Origins. 3 Hours.

A seminar in the origins of the modern world. Class time will emphasize student discussion of assigned relevant historical sources, both primary and secondary. In addition, there will be extensive and varied writing assignments. Honors Program admission of 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor is required.

HIST 219. Environmental History. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the field of Environmental History. It will explore the relationship between people, communities, resources and the environment in the past and will study examples from the U.S., Europe, and other parts of the world. Students will use secondary literature and primary-source case studies to study major environmental themes related to conservation, resource management, land use, development, water, and pollution. Upon completion students will demonstrate understanding of the scope and depth of environmental issues in world history, of the methods historians have developed to approach such questions, and of major case studies related to rural and urban experiences. T.

HIST 220. North Dakota History. 3 Hours.

Survey of the trends and problems in the State of North Dakota and their relations to the upper Mississippi Valley area, from Indian heritage to the present. US.

HIST 227. History of Vietnam. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the history of Vietnam from its formation to the late twentieth century. Topics covered include Vietnam's cultural and historical origins, its place in South-East Asia, colonization under the French, the experience of WWII, the French and American wars in Vietnam, and Vietnam since the 1970s. NW/T.

HIST 230. Test Preparation. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to help students across the Minot State University campus who plan to take exams needed in order to complete major/minor requirements and/or for students struggling with these types of exams. The class is aimed primarily at education majors who are required to take the Principles in Learning and Teaching and the Praxis exams. This is not to say, though, that the course is only for education or history majors. It is open to all students who have or will take these kinds of exams.

HIST 231. Latin American History Survey. 3 Hours.

Survey of the countries below the Rio Grande from pre-Colombian times to the present. Special attention to continuity of Native American culture, colonial legacies, identity, gender roles, revolutions, relations with the U.S., and land and income distribution. NW.

HIST 240. African History Survey. 3 Hours.

Africa has a wide variety of cultures and peoples. In this survey, we will study civilizations in as different areas as the Egyptian Nile, the MAlian savanna, the Congolian rainforest, and East Coast Swahili traders. Topics include; ancient Egypt, Islam, European colonialism and its consequences, apartheid, women, and kinship. NW.

HIST 242. Ancient European Worlds. 3 Hours.

This course surveys Europe's prehistory and antiquity from the agricultural revolution of the Neolithic until the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 CE. It explores the political organization, social institutions, economies, religions, art, and cultures of both the "classical" civilizations of Greece and Rome and the Celts, the Minoans, the Mycenaeans, the Etruscans, and other civilizations that developed in and shaped the ancient European region.

HIST 243. Medieval Europe. 3 Hours.

The study of Western, Central, and Eastern Europe from the break-up of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance (1500). Prerequisite: one history survey course from among HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, 212, or 215H, or consent of the instructor. EU/T.

HIST 244. Renaissance and Reformation. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of significant political, social, cultural, and religious issues of the European Renaissance and Reformation. Prerequisite: One history survey course from among HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, 212, or 215H, or consent of the instructor. EU/T.

HIST 251. Introduction to Public History. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to public history, which is often simply defined as the practice of history outside of the classroom, produced for a non-academic audience. This simple definition belies complicated fundamental issues, such as what role the public audience does and should play in the determination of what issues are of historical concern, and how they should be handled. Starting with consideration of what public history is, and what are its purposes and basic questions, the class will then work on developing some of the basic skills that public historians need. Students will speak with and, in some cases, shadow current professionals in the field. They will be introduced to sources of historical information available in the local community and organizations of value to public historians. Ultimately, students will utilize the ideas and skills that they develop during the semester as they undertake a local historical research project that will culminate in a public presentation. T.

HIST 261. American Indian History. 3 Hours.

A survey of American Indian history from pre-contact to the present, providing an overview of major trends and developments. US/T.

HIST 280. Practice and Method. 3 Hours.

This colloquium introduces students to the tools, research, and writing methods, resources and theoretical approaches required in upper level history courses. It includes a semester-long student-initiated research project that will allow students to refine their skills. The course also features discussion of reading that illustrate a wide variety of historical approaches and methods. To be taken upon declaring a major in history or social science. Course restricted to majors. (Offered spring semester only).

HIST 299. Special Topics in History. 1-8 Hour.

These are flexible courses that may be taught depending on student needs. The design of the course is to present the student an opportunity to concentrate on various topics. Prerequisites may apply. (Depending on topic, course may be categorized as a NW, EU, US, or T).

HIST 315. History of American Women. 3 Hours.

The experience on women in American history, with emphasis upon the continual change in women's role and differences brought about by region, ethnicity, and economic class. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or 215H or consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 319. Colonial America. 3 Hours.

Traces the development of the colonies from the time of European exploration and early English colonization to the confrontations between Britain and America in the 1760s and 1770s. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or 215H or consent of instructor. US.

HIST 320. The Early Republic. 3 Hours.

Study of the social, intellectual, political, and diplomatic forces, issues, and personalities in America's formative (1781-1824) years. Prerequisite: HIST 103 or 104 or consent of instructor. US/C1.

HIST 325. Sectionalism and the Civil War. 3 Hours.

Traces the rise of sectionalism as a forcce on antebellum America leading to the Civil War. Prerequisite: HIST 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/C1.

HIST 328. The Transformation of America. 3 Hours.

Study of industrialization, urbanization, and immigration in America from1865 to 1901, focusing on the social, political. and international consequences of and reaction to economic change. Prerequisite: HIST 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 consent of instructor. US/C1.

HIST 336. African American History. 3 Hours.

Examines the history of African Americans in American society from 1619 to the present, including the West African cultural context, cultural retentions and changes in the American environment, and the emergence of cohesive African American culture. The course pays special attention to the ideas, contributions, and changing roles of African Americans with American society, economy, culture, and politics. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 337. Imperialism in Asia. 3 Hours.

Models of western inperialism will be contrasted woth those developed by Japan and China to develop a comparative study of political, cultural, and social developments in Japan, Indochina, Chinam and other Asian countries. Recent trends and relationships with the West will be emphasized. Prerequisite: HIST 102 or 104 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite: 101 or 102, or 103 or 104 or 211 or 211 or consent of instructor. NW/C2.

HIST 338. History of South Africa. 3 Hours.

South Africa is one of the most beautiful countries in the world, with fascinating historical developments. It is ethnically very diverse, combining African, European, and Asian populations. Today it is trying to forge a new identity as a recently democratic country. The course will examine cultural, political, social, and economic developments from precolonial times to the present. Some topics are: Zulu Wars, Cecil Rhodes' diamonds, the Great Trek, the Boer War, ANC, Apartheid, race relations, and the Truth and Reconciliation Committee. Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211 or 212, or consent of instructor. NW/T.

HIST 341. Roman Republic and Empire. 3 Hours.

This course explores in detail the history of Rome from the foundation of the city in the ninth century B.C.E. through the fall of the western part of the Roman Empire in 476 C.E. Topics discussed include Roman Republican institutions, imperial expansion, the creation of the Roman Empire, the foundation and development of Christianity, and the lasting influence of Rome on European politics and culture. Prerequisite: one history survey course from among HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, 212, or 215H or consent of the instructor. EU/T.

HIST 342. The Age Of The Vikings. 3 Hours.

This course looks not only at the "Viking Age" circa 780-1070 CE but also at the origins of the Vikings and their cultural contexts and legacies. It discusses Scandinavian society from late antiquity through the Middle Ages, exploring social structure, gender ideas and relations, religion and mythology, technology, politics and war, literature, and art. This course details Viking raids, expansion, and integration throughout Europe and examines modern literature and media to discover what "Viking" came to mean long after the Viking Age ended. Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, 212, or 215H or consent of instructor. EU/T.

HIST 343. The Medieval Church. 3 Hours.

This course examines the Christian church and Christendom from its beginnings in the Roman Empire through the eve of the Protestant Reformation. It examines the history and institutions of the church, including monasticism, the papacy, church-state conflicts, East-West divisions, medieval philosophy and theology, mysticism, popular religion, and the Crusades. Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, 212, or 215H, or the consent of the instructor. EU/T.

HIST 347. The Making of Modern Europe. 3 Hours.

A thematic study of Europe during the age of the industrial and social revolution, 1815-1945. This course compares major social and cultural trends across a variety of European nations. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or 215H or consent of instructor. EU.

HIST 350. Europe in 20th Century. 3 Hours.

A detailed consideration of the main political, intellectual, social, and economic trends of 20th century Europe. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or 215H or consent of instructor. EU.

HIST 351. The Mediterranean World. 3 Hours.

This course explores the development and interactions of the many Bronze Age and Iron Age civilizations and peoples of Africa, Asia, and Europe who were connected by the Mediterranean Sea. Those studied include the Egyptians, Minoans, Mycenaeans, Assyrians, Hebrews, Phoenicians, Persians, Greeks, and Romans. Prerequisite: one history survey course from among HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, 212, or 215H, or consent of the instructor. NW/T.

HIST 352. Medieval & Early Modern Women. 3 Hours.

This course examines the lives of European women from the beginning of the Middle Ages through the early seventeenth century. It explores the use of gender as a category for historical interpretation as it investigates women's (and men's) identities, agency, and power in the household, the court, the Church, and the marketplace. While this course does examine the lives of famous women, it primarily seeks to reveal the lives, thoughts, feelings, and experiences of all European women over the course of eleven centuries. Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, 212, or 215H or the consent of instructor. EU/T.

HIST 363. Atlantic History. 3 Hours.

Globalization is not a recent phenmenon. As early as the 15th century, Africans, Americans, and Europeans exchanged ideas, goods, animals, plants, diseases, and people on an ever increasing scale. In this course we will study the various levels of interactions between Africans, Americans, and Europeans between about 1400 and 1800 on the four inhabited continents bordering the Atlantic Ocean. Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211 or 212 or 215H or consent of instructor. NW/T.

HIST 365. Peoples & Cultures of Native North America. 3 Hours.

The course surveys the major culture areas of North America prior to contact with Europeans. In each region particular attention is given to one group or nation to highlight cultural adaptations and development. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or 215H consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 380. History Of Mexico. 3 Hours.

Mexico and the U.S. are entering into an ever closer relationship, but their histories are quite different. This survey outlines the Mexican past from pre-Colombian to modern times. We will focus on one area ( the Andes or Meso America) and study a wide variety of topics such as: conquest, colonialism, religion, gender, protests, and ecology. Prerequisite: one of the following HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. NW.

HIST 385. History of Brazil. 3 Hours.

Brazil is more than carnaval alone, but that is a fundamental aspect of the largest South American society. In this course, we will examine Brazilian history and society from a wide variety of angles. The country is very diverse: from the Amazon rainforest where native peoples still live in isolation, to the Sao Paulo metropolitan area that can compete with any Western country as to modernity and industrial development. Brazil is a country full of contrasts: optimistic but sad, dancing sambas but violent. In the course we will examine Brazil's past and how this contributed to the country's present social, economic, political, and cultural situation. Prerequisite: one of the following HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or 215H or consent of instructor. NW.

HIST 392. Experimental Course in History. 3 Hours.

This is an experimental course that may be taught department needs. The design of the course is to allow the instructor to test and assess content and methodology that may become a permanent part of a department's course listings. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102, 103, or 104 or 211 or 212 or 215H or consent of instructor. Depending on topic, course may be categorized as a NW, EU, US, or T.

HIST 394. Independent Study General Hist. 1-4 Hour.

HIST 399. Readings in History. 1-3 Hour.

Study and discussion of readings in history. Specific topic will be arranged with the instructor. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Depending on topic, course may be categorized as a NW, EU, US, or T.

HIST 401. Historiography. 3 Hours.

A course to consider both the philosophy or theory of history as well as the mechanics of "doing" history. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or 215H or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester only.).

HIST 410. Trans-Mississippi West. 3 Hours.

An in-depth look at the impact of this region on the development and growth of America. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 415. 20th Century America. 3 Hours.

A seminar focusing on a particular theme or time period of 20th century America history. A specific focus will be selected each time the course is offered. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or 102 or 103 or 104 or 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. T/US.

HIST 420. Indian People of the Great Plains. 3 Hours.

Study of the culture and history of the Indian Peoples of the Great Plains. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, 212 or consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 430. Native American Social History. 3 Hours.

Seminar examining the different social experiences of Native peoples in North America. Topics include, among others, historical demography, gender, intercultural relations with the U.S. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, or 212 or consent of instructor. US/T.

HIST 434. History and Multimedia. 1-3 Hour.

This course is designed to teach students to transform the content of a traditional seminar paper into a variety of multimedia formats. It introduces students to current digital tools, explores design issues and organizational strategies, and considers how to design presentations for varied audiences such as museums, children and schools, internet users, portable device users, and senior populations. No technical background is required, although students will need to have completed a 300 or 400 level history research paper to use as the raw material for this course, or they must co-enroll in a 300 or 400 level history class that requires such a paper. T.

HIST 435. Latin American History Seminar. 3 Hours.

A seminar focusing on a particular aspect of the history of the Latin American societies. Topics for focus may vary from Ameri-Indian societies, gender, environmental history, social-economic situation, and relations with the U.S. Prerequisites: two of the following HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, or 212 or consent of instructor. NW/T.

HIST 440. Comparative Slavery in the Americas. 3 Hours.

North and South America have different experiences with salvery. In this course we will compare and contrast the African impact on both continents, especially in Brazil and the United States. Some topics that we will study are the slave trades, runaway slave societies, the Haitian revolution, African religions, race relations, gender roles, families, and the meanings of freedom. Prerequisites: two of the following HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, or 212 or consent of instructor. T.

HIST 441. The Early Middle Ages. 3 Hours.

This seminar focuses on Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, the period from the late fourth through the late tenth centuries C.E. during which the Western Roman Empire was replaced by the individual kingdoms and principalities of medieval Europe. Participants will research the history and historiography of this period, which includes the "barbarian invasions" of Rome and the fall of the Western Roman Empire, the rise of the Roman Church, the transition from Classical to medieval philosophy, the establishment of the Carolingian and Holy Roman Empires, and the foundation of medieval European political, social, and economic systems. This course requires writing a major research paper. Prerequisite: HIST 280 and HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, 212, or 215H.

HIST 442. The Crusades. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the period of the Crusades from its inception in the late eleventh century, to its maturity in the twelfth and thirteenth century, and through its final demise in the later Middle Ages. The examination of the development of the idea of crusade throughout these periods proves crucial to understanding the Crusades themselves, as the idea of crusade changed dramatically during each period. In this course we will exam each of these periods carefully, taking into consideration the various developments in the idea of crusade. We will also consider the impact that the Crusades have had on modern events. Prerequisite: History 101, 102, 103, 104, 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. NW/T.

HIST 460. Modern France and Francophone Society. 3 Hours.

An in-depth seminar on the major themes of modern French history from 1750 to the present. Prerequisites: HIST 101 , 102, 103, 104, 211, or 212 or consent of instructor. EU/T.

HIST 491. History Seminar. 3 Hours.

An advanced seminar in history with a major paper requirement. Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 211, or 212 or consent of instructor.

HIST 494. Independent Study Honors Hist. 1-8 Hour.

Depending on topic, course may be categorized as a NW, EU, US, or T.

HIST 497. Internship. 1-6 Hour.

Placement in applied public history setting for practical experience. Prerequisite: HIST 280 and consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit.

HIST 499. Special Topics in History. 1-8 Hour.

This course is a flexible course that may be taught depending on student needs. The design of the course is to present the student an opportunity to concentrate on various topics. Prerequisites may apply. Depending on topic, course may be categorized as a NW, EU, US, or T.

HUM Courses

HUM 194. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of humanities.

HUM 210. Research Strategies. 2 Hours.

Both practical and theoretical in scope, this class is designed to help students become full participants in our Information Society. This class uses a mixture of lecture, in class discussion, hands on assignments, and written research project to give the student the technical skills and critical thinking abilities they need to use the printed and electronic information resources found in libraries and on the Internet.

HUM 251. Humanities. 3 Hours.

Integrated course in art, literature, and music from the Stone Ages through the Early Middle Ages.

HUM 252. Humanities. 3 Hours.

Integrated course in art, literature, and music from the Gothic Period through the Seventeenth Century.

HUM 253. Humanities. 3 Hours.

Integrated course in art, literature, and music from the Eighteenth Century to the Modern Era.

HUM 254. Non-Western Humanities. 3 Hours.

An integrated survey of the art, literature, philosophy, and history of a particular non-western culture. The specific culture studied from year to year will vary bur could rotate among Japanese, African, pre-Columbian American, Chinese, or Indian. May be repeated for credit.

HUM 296. Study Tour. 1-3 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. Does not count towards the Humanities minor.

HUM 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HUM 394. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of humanities.

HUM 399. Special Topics. 1-3 Hour.

Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of humanities.

HUM 496. Study Tour. 1-6 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. The course requirements will include additional requirements beyond the travel itself and may be repeated for credit.

HUM 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

INT Courses

INT 101. Orientation To Minot State. 1-2 Hour.

An intensive orientation program offered to prepare incoming students for academic and social life at Minot State University. Students are introduced to the services and opportunities available through the University. Students also learn basis concepts behind higher education and engage in exercises that emphasize the use of writing and critical thinking.

INT 151. Writing And Thinking Workshop. 2 Hours.

INT 175. Transition to University Life. 2 Hours.

This course of designed to ease the new student's transition into college and provide opportunities for the student to obtain knowledge and skills necessary to complete his/her educational goals. Some of the topics covered are: campus resources, stress management, assertive comminication, conflict resolution, leadership, and money management.

INT 190. Study Skills. 2 Hours.

This course will contain practical strategies for a successful college experience. Topics will include: time management, listening skills, textbook reading skills, identifying learning styles, test-taking techniques, and effective writing. This course is appropriate for anyone wishing to improve learning skills.

INT 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Topics variable. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.

INT 394. Independent Study. 1-4 Hour.

INT 494. Independent Study Honors. 1-8 Hour.

INT 496. Study Abroad (Non-Reciprocal). 1-18 Hour.

Students registered will study abroad in programs not governed by reciprocal exchange agreements with Minot State University. The course is considered as a place holder and required for students studying abroad in order to maintain full-time status. In addition, course content is designed to enhance cross-cultural learning and provide guidance on how to approach living and adapting to another culture and community. Courses and grades earned abroad will be entered as transfer credits from the host institution for the related semester of study abroad. Prerequisites: Restricted to students who have at least Sophomore status, a 2.5 GPA, and approval from the Office of International Programs.

INT 497. Study Abroad. 1-18 Hour.

Students registered will study abroad in programs governed by reciprocal exchange agreements with Minot State University. The course is considered as a placeholder and required for students studying abroad in order to maintain full-time status. In addition, course content is designed to enhance cross-cultural learning and provide guidance on how to approach living and adapting to another culture and community. Course and grades earned abroad will be entered as transfer credits from the host institution for the related semester of study abroad. Prerequisites: Restricted to students who have at least Sophomore status, a 2.5 GPA, and approval from the Office of International Programs.

INT 499. Special Topics. 12.00 Hours.

Topics variable. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.

LANG Courses

LANG 95. Foreign Language Experience. 0 Hours.

This is a service course in which students could use their language skills by tutoring in the schools, volunteering in the courthouse and hospitals, or presenting language lessons in the nursing homes with songs and parties.

LANG 104. Native Languages of America. 3 Hours.

This is an introduction to linguistic analysis using the languages native to North America as our template. Students will examine particular languages with an eye towards their sounds, word forms, and word order. Additionally, students will observe the historical development and cultural significance of particular native languages. Languages native to North Dakota such as Hidatsa, Mandan, Arikara, Lakota, Nakota, Dakota, Chippewa, and Cree will be highlighted.

LANG 105. Writing Systems. 3 Hours.

A history of the principle writing systems of the world and a discussion of how they work. In addition to studying cuneiform, Egyptian hieroglyphs, Chinese characters, Japanese kana and kanji, Korean hangul, Mayan glyphs, Hindi's devanagari, Linear A and B, Cree's alphasyllabary, Russian's cyrillic, Cherokee's syllabary, Hebrew and Arabic's consonantal writing systems, ample time will be spent tracing the history and development of the Roman alphabet's individual letters.

LANG 206. Latin and Greek in Scientific Terminology. 1 Hour.

This course familiarizes students with the Latin and Greek building blocks which are so fundamental to much terminology in the natural sciences. The morphological structure of Latin and Greek words will be explored as will the semantic ranges of the most common and useful affixes and roots.

LANG 298. Syntax & Morphology. 3 Hours.

To introduce ESL (English as a Second Language) students to the richness of English affixes as well as to the rules of sentence formation. Specifically: 1.

LANG 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

LANG 390. Foreign Language Methods. 4 Hours.

Practical Methods for teaching foreign languages. Examines theories of second language acquisition and research in effectiveness of various teaching strategies. Includes a 60 hour practicum in high school classes with some practice teaching. This course is limited to and required of foreign language majors and minors in the BSE program. Does not count towards the residency requirements for the FL BSE major or minor. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education or department consent.

LANG 394. Independent Study General Lang. 1-4 Hour.

LANG 404. TA Foreign Language Seminar. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide structure to the experience of teaching foreign languages as a Fulbright Language Teaching Assistant (FLTA).

LANG 451. Study Abroad Recap. 1-6 Hour.

After completing a significant period of immersion in the target culture,students take this course at Minot State University the semester upon returning. The foreign language faculty assist students in reflecting upon their study abroad experience while narrowing down topics for a senior capstone. This course is restricted to declared FL BA/BSE majors and minors. It does not count towards the residency requirement for the FL BA/BSE major or minor; exceptions by department consent. This is taken at Minot State University the semester after returning from study abroad. Prerequisite: Restricted to students who are Foreign Language majors.

LANG 499. Independent Study Honors Lang. 1-8 Hour.

LAT Courses

LAT 101. Beginning Latin I. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the grammar and language of the Roman Empire with emphasis on Latinate words surviving into English. Throughout, students will be exposed to snippets from real Latin authors, e.g. Caesar, Vergil, Cicero, Ovid.

LAT 102. Beginning Latin II. 4 Hours.

A continuation of Latin 101 with an introduction to more advanced grammar topics such as the subjunctive, indirect discourse, conditional sentences, and the supine. Increasingly more advanced literary texts are also introduced.

LAT 201. Intermediate Latin I. 4 Hours.

A continuation of Latin 102 with primary focus on reading prose. Reading selections will come from Caesar's "Gallic Wars", Cicero's "Pro Caelio", Augustus' "Res Gestae", Suetonius' "The Twelve Caesers", and portions of Jerome's Vulgate Bible. Prerequisite: Student must complete Latin 102 before enrolling in this class.

LAT 202. Intermediate Latin II. 4 Hours.

To continue in the reading of original Latin prose authors such as Cicero, Caesar, Tacitus, and Suetonius as well as to explore the works of various poets such as Vergil, Horace, and Catullus. A final portion of the class will offer an overview of the development of the Latin language into the Romance languages. Prerequisite: Students must complete Latin 201 before enrolling in this course.

MATH Courses

MATH 103. College Algebra. 4 Hours.

This course explores fundamental college algebra topics, either as preparation for further study in mathematics or to meet the general education requirement. Topics of study include the following: relations, functions, and graphing; equations and inequalities; complex numbers; radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; matrices; sequences and series; and the binomial theorem. Prerequisite: ASC 093 with C or better, or qualifying math placement test score, or ACT math subtest score of 21 or higher.

MATH 104. Finite Mathematics. 4 Hours.

This course is for students whose major does not require MATH 103 College Algebra, MATH 107 Precalculus, or courses in calculus. This course emphasizes the understanding and application of mathematics as they are used in everyday life. Topics of study include systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming, logic, mathematics of finance, elementary probability, and descriptive statistics. This course does not serve as the prerequisite for any other math course. Prerequisite: ASC 093 with C or better or qualifying math placement test score, or ACT math subtest score of 21 or higher.

MATH 105. College Trigonometry. 2 Hours.

A study of angles, trigonometric function and their inverses, solving triangles, trigonometric identities and equations, polar coordinates, and applications. Prerequisite: Students must complete MATH 103 with a C or better or have an ACT subscore of 25 or higher before enrolling.

MATH 107. Precalculus. 4 Hours.

This course includes the study of equations and inequalities, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, standard forms, polar-coordinates and introduction to parametric equations, graphing, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations, and applications. Prerequisite(s): MATH 103 with a C or better, or qualifying math placement test score, or ACT math subtest score or 25 or higher.

MATH 146. Applied Calculus. 3 Hours.

Introduction to differential and integral calculus with applications from areas such as social science and business. Topics include limits, derivatives, integrals, exponential and logarithmic functions, and applications. Prerequisite(s): MATH 103 with a C or better, or qualifying math placement test score, or ACT math subtest of 25 or higher.

MATH 165. Calculus I. 4 Hours.

Topics include limits, continuity, differentiation, Mean Value Theorem, integration (indefinite and definite integrals), Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and applications. Prerequisite(s): MATH 107 with a C or better, or MATH 103 and 105 with a C or better, or qualifying math placement test score, or ACT math subtest score or 29 or higher.

MATH 166. Calculus II. 4 Hours.

Topics include applications of integration, methods of integration, polar equations, sequences, series, power series, and application Prerequisisite(s): MATH 165 with a C or better.

MATH 201H. Environmental Mathematics. 3 Hours.

Exploration of environmental issues using mathematical models together with real world data. Topics may include: ecology, health sciences, economics, genetics, and other environmental issues. Possible field experience. Prerequisite(s): Math 102 with a C or higher, or qualifying math placement test score, or ACT math subtest score of 22 or higher.

MATH 205. Math Proof & Problem Solving. 3 Hours.

A course on mathematical proofs and axiomatic systems. Topics may include set theory, formal logic, combinatorics, graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 165.

MATH 208. Discrete Mathematics I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to discrete mathematics with an emphasis in computer science and applications including: sets and set theory, Boolean algebra and digital logic theory, formal logic and equivalence, mathematical proofs (direct, contradiction, contrapositve, and induction), sequences and recursion, relations and functions, and relational algebra. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or MATH 107 or MATH 146 or MATH 165 with a C or better.

MATH 209. Discrete Mathematics II. 3 Hours.

Intermediate discrete mathematics with an emphasis in computer science and applications including: combinatorics and probability, graph theory including circuits, isomorphisms, trees, shortest path algorithms, algorithm analysis, regular expressions and formal languages, and finite-state automata. Prerequisite: MATH 208 with a C or better.

MATH 210. Elementary Statistics. 4 Hours.

An examination of introductory statistics concepts, including sampling, descriptive statistics, probability, correlation, regression, binomial and normal distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing of one and two populations, ANOVA, and Chi-square tests. Technology will be used to enhance learning and mirror statistical applications and practices in the larger world. Prerequisite(s): ASC with a C or better, or qualifying math placement test score, or ACT math subtest score of 21or higher.

MATH 265. Calculus III. 4 Hours.

Functions of more than one variable, multiple integrals, line integrals, Green's and Stroke's theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 166.

MATH 266. Introduction to Differential Equations. 3 Hours.

First order equations, linear equations, systems of equations, series methods, Prerequisite: MATH 265 and MATH 314.

MATH 277. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I. 3 Hours.

A course for elementary education majors. Topics include problem solving, number systems (natural numbers through the reals), number theory, and proportional reasoning. Technology and manipulatives are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or MATH 104. Co-requisite: ED 221.

MATH 294. Intro to Research Math. 1-2 Hour.

Students explore topics, expand their mathematical knowledge, and begin to conduct intro ductory research under the direction of a faculty mentor. The number of credits is proportional to the time committed to the research (1 SH = 3 hours of student work per week on average). Repeatable for up to 4 credits total. Prerequisite(s): MATH 165 with a B or better; instructor permission required.

MATH 299. Special Topic. 1-4 Hour.

MATH 305. Linear Algebra. 4 Hours.

Real vector spaces, subspaces, linear transformations, matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectorsm vector geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 107 or advanced placement.

MATH 314. Introduction to Mathematical Programming. 2 Hours.

An introduction to symbolic, numerical, and graphical computing using mathematical software packages. MATLAB will be used during fall semesters and Mathematica will be used during spring semesters. Prerequisite: Students must complete MATH 165 and MATH 305 before enrolling in this course.

MATH 315. Intro to Mathematical Modeling. 3 Hours.

An introduction to mathematical modeling is the translation of a real world problem into a well formulated mathematical model. Students will develop the basic skills and techniques of formulation, simulation, analysis, and testing of mathematical models for describing and predicting a variety of phenomena. Understanding the fundamental principles in model formulation in physics, chemistry, biology, business, economics, medicine, and social and environmental sciences will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Student must complete MATH 165 and MATH 314 before enrolling in this class.

MATH 320. Number Theory. 3 Hours.

Unique factorization, residue theory, Diophantine equations, quadratic equations and reciprocity. Prerequisite: MATH 205.

MATH 325. Algebra for Secondary Teachers. 3 Hours.

Algebra topics in the secondary mathematics curriculum are explored using a variety of manipulative, technologies, and teaching resources. Focus areas include patterning, connections between algebraic topics, and multiple ways of knowing and learning algebraic topics. Prerequisite: Students must complete MATH 165 before enrolling in this course.

MATH 330. College Geometry. 4 Hours.

Geometry for secondary teachers. Euclidean geometry using both inductive and deductive approaches. Teaching tools include appropriate technology. Standard topics plus finite and transformational geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 205.

MATH 345. Linear Models. 4 Hours.

An introduction to statistical methods including topics from sampling, hypothesis testing, nonparametric statistics, resampling, simple and multiple regressions, and the general linear model. Computer statistical packages will be integrated into the course. Prerequisite: MATH 210 or equivalent.

MATH 346. Experimental Design. 4 Hours.

Statistical methods including topics from analysis of variance; fixed and random factors; block, nested, and crossed designs; factorial, fractional factorial and confounded designs; split plot designs; and multivariate analysis. Computer statistical packages will be integrated into the course. Prerequisite: MATH 210.

MATH 371. Early Practicum. 1 Hour.

This course will require a minimum of 45 clock hours in a practicum experience. The experience can be any one of or combination of the following: secondary classroom, teaching assistant on campus, tutor on or off campus, tutor in the MSU Math Clinic, tutor at Job Corps, or some other experience approved by the Mathematics Department. Prerequisite(s): MATH 165.

MATH 377. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II. 2 Hours.

A course for elementary education majors. Topics include probability, statistics, and geometry. Calculators, computer software, and manipulatives are throughout the course. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or MATH 104 or equivalent.

MATH 380. History of Mathematics. 3 Hours.

Development of mathematics from its early beginning through the present axiomatic approach. Problems from each era are included. Prerequisite: MATH 107 or advanced placement.

MATH 381. Secondary Math Practicum. 1 Hour.

This course will require a minimum of 60 clock hours in a practicum experience. The experience will take place in a grades 7-12 setting. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education. Prereq/Coreq: MATH 391.

MATH 391. Teaching Mathematics. 3 Hours.

Intended for secondary mathematics teachers. Planning mathematics lessons, developing mathematics teachingskills. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education.

MATH 394. Independent Study General Math. 1-4 Hour.

MATH 420. Abstract Algebra. 4 Hours.

Introduction to abstract algebraic systems. Groups, rings, homomorphisms and isomorphisms. Prerequisites: MATH 205.

MATH 445. Probability And Statistics I. 4 Hours.

Introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, distribution functions, special probability distributions. Prerequisite: MATH 146 or 166.

MATH 446. Probability and Statistics II. 4 Hours.

Multivariate probability distributions. Functions of random variables, moment generating functions, sampling distributions, estimation methods, properties of point estimations, linear models, somes special experimental designs. Prerequisite: MATH 445.

MATH 450. Real Analysis. 4 Hours.

Limits of functions and sequences, continuitym topology of the reals, differentiationm Riemann Integrationm convergence and uniform convergence. Prerequisite: MATH 205.

MATH 460. Complex Analysis. 3 Hours.

Analytic functions, conformal maps, Cauchy integral formula, residue theorem. Prerequisites: MATH 265, 450.

MATH 466. Intro to Partial Differential Equations. 3 Hours.

Solution of the standard partial differential equations (Laplace's equation, transport equation, heat equation, wave equation) by separation of variables and transform methods, including eigenfunction expansions, Fourier and Laplace transform. Boundary value problems, orthogonality and Fourier series. Prerequisite: MATH 266.

MATH 470. Numerical Analysis. 4 Hours.

Error analysis, numerical differentiation and integration, linear systems and numerical solutions to differential equations. The computer language of instruction will be FORTRAN. Prerequisites: Student must complete MATH 265, 305, and 314 before enrolling in this class.

MATH 494. Directed Research in Math. 1-4 Hour.

Students conduct research under the direction of a faculty mentor. The general topic and specific goals and activites are agreed upon by the student and the mentor. While publication or presentation is not a requirement, all projects have a goal of producing publishable/presentable results. The number of credits is proportional to the time committed to the research (1 SH = 3 hours of student work per week on average). Repeatable for up to 8 credits total. Prerequisite(s): MATH 294 (2 SH); instructor consent.

MATH 499. Special Topics. 1-4 Hour.

MUSC Courses

MUSC 099. Recitals/Concerts. 0 Hours.

This if a non-credit course which will appear on each music major's semester program. It is designed to accumulate information as to the student's required attendance at predesignated recitals, concerts, and seminars. The final grade will be either Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U).

MUSC 100. Music Appreciation. 3 Hours.

Designed for the non-music majors and may be used as partial fulfillment of Humanities requirement. Representative works from many cultures will be studied.

MUSC 101. Fundamentals of Music. 2 Hours.

Introduction to fundamental elements of music and functioal musicianship for non-music majors.

MUSC 102. Private Piano. 0.5-4 Hour.

Course restricted to majors. Repeatable for credit.

MUSC 103. Private Harpsichord. 1 Hour.

Course restricted to majors. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: Restricted to students who are music or music education majors.

MUSC 105. Women's Chorus. 1 Hour.

Open to female singers with interest in singing.

MUSC 106. Private Organ. 0.5-4 Hour.

Repeatable for credit.

MUSC 110. Audio/Video Technology. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to provide basic knowledge and gain experience with recording live performances. Employing both on campus and online resources, the students will study basic practices for recording and production as they apply that knowledge to recording projects within the Division of Music. Prerequisite: Restricted to students who are music majors.

MUSC 111. Private Voice. 0.5-4 Hour.

Repeatable for credit.

MUSC 112. Diction for Singers I. 2 Hours.

Introduces rules, concepts and practice of proper pronunciation and articulation for singing in English and Italian using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Develops specific language skills necessary for solo vocal and choral singing and teaching. [Course offered every fall semester.].

MUSC 113. Diction for Singers II. 2 Hours.

Introduces rules, concepts and practice of proper pronunciation and articulation for singing in French and German using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Develops specific language skills necessary for solo vocal and choral singing and teaching. [Course offered ever spring semester.] Prerequisite: Students must complete MUSC 112 before enrolling in this course.

MUSC 114. Western Plains Opera Production. 1 Hour.

The Western Plains Opera Production course will provide students a variety of opportunities for growth through both the performance and technical aspects of a fully-staged professional music production.

MUSC 115. Opera-Musical Production. 1 Hour.

Techniques of production and staging dramatic musical works, employing operas and scenes from operas. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

MUSC 116. Private Strings. 0.5-4 Hour.

Repeatable for credit.

MUSC 117. Private Classical Guitar. 0.5-4 Hour.

Repeatable for credit.

MUSC 119. Vocal Ensemble. 1 Hour.

Membership subject to approval of director. (Rehearsals by arrangement.).

MUSC 120. Concert Choir. 1 Hour.

Membership subject to approval of director.

MUSC 121. Intro to Music Theory. 2 Hours.

Foundations of music notation and basic music literacy. Course provides a background for MUSC 122 Music Theory and a foundation for successful pursuit of the Music major. Prerequisite: Students must enroll in MUSC 123 Aural Skills at the same time.

MUSC 122. Music Theory I. 3 Hours.

Study of music notation and basic structure of music, including key signatures, scales, chords, fourpart writing and instrumental notation. Provides students with practical applications of music theory concepts. Meets three times weekly.

MUSC 123. Aural Skills I. 1 Hour.

A lab experience meeting twice weekly, to develop abilities in sight-singing, ear training, rhythm reading and error detection, interval and chord identification.

MUSC 124. Music Theory II. 3 Hours.

Further develops a student's understanding of music notation and basis structures of music, including voice-leading, figured bass, melodic forms, modulations and seventh chords. Meets three times per week. Prerequisite: MUSC 122.

MUSC 125. Aural Skills II. 1 Hour.

A lab experience meeting twice weekly, to develop abilities in sight-singing, ear training, rhythm reading and error detection, interval and chord identification. Prerequisite: MUSC 123.

MUSC 126. Private Brass. 0.5-4 Hour.

Repeatable for credit.

MUSC 127. MSU Singers. 1 Hour.

By audition.

MUSC 128. Keyboard Theory I. 1 Hour.

Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in MUSC 122 before enrolling in this course.

MUSC 130. Brass Ensemble. 1 Hour.

Rehearsals are arranged and membership is subject to approval of director.

MUSC 131. Private Percussion. 0.5-4 Hour.

Repeatable for credit.

MUSC 133. Private Woodwinds. 0.5-4 Hour.

Repeatable for credit.

MUSC 135. Woodwind Ensemble. 1 Hour.

Rehearsals arranged and membership subject to approval of director.

MUSC 140. String Ensemble. 1 Hour.

Membership subject to approval of director.

MUSC 145. Percussion Ensemble. 1 Hour.

Rehearsals are arranged and membership subject to approval of director.

MUSC 150. Orchestra. 1 Hour.

Rehearses Thursday evening. The Minot Symphony Orchestra is a university-comminity organization. Open to qualified students upon approval of director.

MUSC 153. Accompanying. 3 Hours.

MUSC 155. Wind Ensemble. 1 Hour.

Open to qualified students subject to approval of director.

MUSC 160. Concert Band. 1 Hour.

Open to qualified students subject to approval of director.

MUSC 163. Beaver Athletic Band. 1 Hour.

Brass & Percussion Ensemble which performs at athletic events, in concert and in recital, community events and tours regularly. Members are selected by audition.

MUSC 164. Musical Theatre Professional Preparation. 2 Hours.

Designed to prepare students to be successful at professional Musical Theatre auditions and to provide them with practical skills and information related to show business (i.e: agents, managers, unions, negotiating, contracts, headshots, resumes, casting directors, etc.).

MUSC 165. Jazz Ensemble. 1 Hour.

Open to qualified students subject to approval of director.

MUSC 167. Jazz Combo. 1 Hour.

Open to qualified students subject to approval of director.

MUSC 177. Functional Piano. 1 Hour.

A piano class designed for studentd who are beginners on the instrument, first year theory students, and elementary education majors. Course restricted to majors. (Class meets twice weekly.) Prerequisite: Restricted to students who are music or music education majors.

MUSC 178. Functional Piano. 1 Hour.

Continuation of MUSC 177. Prerequisite: MUSC 177. (Class meets twice weekly.).

MUSC 180. Class Guitar I. 1 Hour.

Beginning technique in chord and melody playing is developed in class ensemble. Courses in progressive order of advancement.

MUSC 181. Class Guitar II. 1 Hour.

Continuation of MUSC 180. Prerequisite: MUSC 180.

MUSC 201. World Music. 3 Hours.

Designed to introduce the world's major music's in order to encourage and enhance cultural diverdity. May be used as partial fulfillment of the Humanities requirement.

MUSC 202. Private Piano. 1-3 Hour.

Upper division private study.

MUSC 203. Music Theatre Studio. 1 Hour.

Performance of major roles of Musical Theatre in studio projects. Emphasis on the student's integration of singing, acting, and movement into a unified performance.

MUSC 205. History of US Through Music. 3 Hours.

Designed for the non-music majors and may be used as partial fulfillment of the Humanities requirement. American music which accompanied significant historical eras and development will be studied.

MUSC 206. Private Organ. 1-3 Hour.

Upper division private study.

MUSC 207. History of Pop and Rock Music. 3 Hours.

Pop Music and American Liberal Capitalism helped to create a planetary culture. Twentieth century events that brought the world to this pass were not so much a movement as a force of creativity and capitalism yoked by the first global communications network. This course brings liberal arts students into contact with tools and information on this subject.

MUSC 211. Private Voice. 1-3 Hour.

Upper division private study.

MUSC 216. Private Strings. 1-3 Hour.

Upper division private study.

MUSC 222. Music Theory III. 3 Hours.

A continuing study of the underlying theoretical background of tonal music, begun in Theory I and II. Topics include a thorough study of chromatic harmony and the deterioration of functional harmony in the late 19th century to the demise of tonality on the 20th. Analytical techniques are stressed. Meets three times per week. Prerequisite: MUSC 123, 124, or 125.

MUSC 223. Aural Skills III. 1 Hour.

A practical continuation of previous aural studies. Areas to be covered include advanced work in musical dictation, error detection, and sight singing. Meets twice per week. Prerequisite: MUSC 124 or 125.

MUSC 224. Form and Analysis. 2 Hours.

This course will explore the analysis of compositional forms, phrase structure and advances harmonic analysis of works from the 18th century to modern music. The course is restricted to music majors. Prerequisite: MUSC 222.

MUSC 225. Aural Skills IV. 1 Hour.

A practical continuation of previous aural studies. Areas to be covered include highly advanced work in musical dictation, error detection, and sight singing. Meets three times per week. Prerequisite: MUSC 222 or 223.

MUSC 226. Private Brass. 1-3 Hour.

Upper division study.

MUSC 231. Private Percussion. 1-3 Hour.

Upper division private study.

MUSC 233. Private Woodwinds. 1-3 Hour.

Upper division private study.

MUSC 250. Basic Conducting. 2 Hours.

MUSC 260. Introduction to Music History. 3 Hours.

Survey of the history and traditions of western civilization through its music. Students will focus on the musical content and trace developmental trends through the common periods of music history. This course is restricted to music majors.

MUSC 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

MUSC 301. Music Methods for the Elementary Teachers. 2 Hours.

Methods and materials for the classroom teacher in guiding young children in musical experiences K-6. Prerequisites: MUSC 101 or 122 and Admission to Teacher Education.

MUSC 305. Musical Theatre History. 3 Hours.

History of Musical Theatre, primarily focusing on American Musical Theatre, from its defining influences and roots to the present. Topics to be covered include significant productions, composers, lyricists, librettists, choreographers, directors, designers, and actors.

MUSC 306. Music History and Literature I. 3 Hours.

This course will develop the students' knowledge of Western Civilization through its musical history and literature dating from ancient Greece to 1750. Students will focus on analytical and listening skills to further their understanding of musical styles.

MUSC 307. Music History and Literature II. 3 Hours.

This course will develop the students' knowledge of Western Civilization through its musical history and literature dating from 1750 to the present. Students will focus on analytical and listening skills to further their understanding of musical styles.

MUSC 325. Vocal Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

MUSC 340. Voice Methods. 1 Hour.

This course investigates basic vocal pedagogy methods, introducing essential tools for teaching singing. Student will study international phonetic alphabet to assist foreign language diction skills, and explore repertoire suited for the beginning singer. Prerequisite: restricted to major or consent of instructor.

MUSC 341. String Methods. 1 Hour.

A practical class involving the playing and techniques of teaching the bowed, orchestral string instruments (violin, viola, cello, and string bass) at the elementary level. Teaching materials and string pedagogy are also considered.

MUSC 342. Woodwind Methods. 1 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to give teh student an introduction to the techniques of playing and teaching woodwinds. Teaching methods, proper playing position, embouchure, common problems and errors made by students, equipment, maintenance and repair of the instruments, and both pedagogical and performance literature will be presented.

MUSC 343. Brass Methods. 1 Hour.

Teaching techniques and performance proficiency on each of the brass family instruments.

MUSC 344. Percussion Methods. 1 Hour.

Techniques and methods of playing and teaching percussion.

MUSC 345. Wind Band Literature. 2 Hours.

MUSC 346. Symphonic Literature. 2 Hours.

MUSC 347. Chamber Music Literature. 2 Hours.

MUSC 350. Advanced Conducting and Arranging. 3 Hours.

Objectives of this course are developing and refining gestures which convey musical meaning, to successfully arrange simple scores for a variety of ensembles using standard notational software, to refine interpretive skills, and to develop an ability to critique and improve ones own conducting. Prerequisites: Restricted to students who are music majors with junior or senior status.

MUSC 366. Instrumental Jazz Improvisation I. 2 Hours.

Study of the utilization and translation of basic musical elements such as scales, mixolyfian modes, dominant seventh chords, rhythm, form, and melody into an individually creative jazz performance. Open to all instruments including strings.

MUSC 367. Instrumental Jazz Improvisation II. 2 Hours.

Continuation of MUSC 366 by studying teh dorian modes, minor seventh chords, and integration rhythm and melody with actual playing to further the students progress. Prerequisite: MUSC 366.

MUSC 384. Orchestra Methods in Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Provides the parallel alternative for Band and Choral Methods classes. The string educator is often hired to teach only strings for a school system. This course includes methods and materials relative to a successful string program. Pre-requisites: MUSC 124 and admission to teacher education.

MUSC 390. Band Methods in Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Instrumental conducting, score reading and performance preparation, including examination of methods and materials used in the secondary band program. Prerequisites: MUSC 124 and admission to Teacher Education.

MUSC 391. Choral Methods in Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Choral conducting, score reading and performance preparation, including examination of methods and materials used in the secondary choir program. Prerequisites: MUSC 124 and admission to Teacher Education.

MUSC 392. Elementary Music Methods. 3 Hours.

Methods and materials used in elementary general music/choral music program grades K-8. Prerequisites: MUSC 123, 124, 125, and admission to Teacher Education.

MUSC 397. Elementary Music Field Experience. 1 Hour.

Development of basic skills on fretted instruments (guitar, ukelele), recorder, autoharp, percussion instruments for use in the elementary music classroom. Prerequisite: MUSC 124 and Admission to Teacher Education.

MUSC 440. Instrument Repair. 1 Hour.

Basic techniques in instrument maintenance and care.

MUSC 441. Piano Tuning. 2 Hours.

Study of piano tuning, piano construction and repair in addition to organ tuning, Prerequisites: The ability to play all major chords and any two note interval. May be repeated.

MUSC 442. Piano Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

The examination of teaching methods and applied music instruction management for piano majors.

MUSC 480. Senior Project. 1 Hour.

Capstone project representing accomplishment in designated applied study area.

MUSC 494. Independent Study Honors Music. 1-8 Hour.

MUSC 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

PHIL Courses

PHIL 100. Critical Thinking. 3 Hours.

The study of effective thinking, both logic and evaluative.

PHIL 101. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Basic problems, concepts, and methods of philosophy.

PHIL 102. Philosophy of Human Nature. 3 Hours.

Focuses on what it means to be a human being and the so-called "nature-nurture controversy.".

PHIL 201. Philosophy of Religion. 3 Hours.

A critical examination of the reasonability of religious belief. The existance of God, the problem of evil, and other topics will be discussed.

PHIL 210. Ethics. 3 Hours.

A study of traditional concepts in ethical theory and moral reasoning.

PHIL 299. Special Topics In Philosophy. 1-8 Hour.

PHIL 330. Political Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course examines the basic principles and features of the major political philosophies and system s of government.

PHIL 380. Existentialism. 3 Hours.

A careful examination of major existentialist thinkers (Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, etc.) and dominant existential themes: ailenation, mortality, the meaning of life, and God.

PHIL 383. Asian Philosophy. 3 Hours.

A critical examination to the leading eastern worldviews: Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism, and the eastern views.

PHIL 394. Advanced Philosophy. 3 Hours.

PHIL 399. Independent Study General Phil. 1-4 Hour.

PHIL 494. Independent Study Honors Phil. 1-8 Hour.

PHIL 499. Special Topics In Philosophy. 1-8 Hour.

PHYS Courses

PHYS 110. Astronomy. 4 Hours.

A study of the universe that begins with the earth as a planet, the planets and the satellities of our solar system, and moves out through stellar astronomy to galaxies and into the very fabric of the universe. It includes an evaluation of the methods and techniques of astronomy. Offered fall semester. Both day and night laboratories. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

PHYS 110H. Honors Astronomy. 4 Hours.

A study of the universe that begins with the earth as a planet, the planets and the satellites of our solar system, and moves out through stellar astronomy to galaxies and into the very fabric of the universe. Evaluation of the methods and techniques of astronomy. Explicit training in use of the full spectrum of the MSU observatory equipment. Offered fall semester. Both day and night laboratories. Lecutre, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Honors program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of instructor.

PHYS 203. Introduction to Physics I. 4 Hours.

Elementary laws and principles of mechanics and fluids. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Prerequisite: MATH 103.

PHYS 204. Introduction to Physics II. 4 Hours.

Elementary laws of electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 203.

PHYS 221. General Physics I. 5 Hours.

Newton's law's; work and energy; impluse and momentum; angular momentum; oscillations; gravity; wave motion; thermodynamics. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Corequisite: MATH 165.

PHYS 221H. Honors General Physics I. 5 Hours.

Newton's Laws; work and energy; impulse and momentum; angular mementum; oscillations; gravity; wave motionl; thermodynamics. Emphasis on sophisticated quantitative reasoning, order of magnitude estimation, in-depth application of calculation, and physical underpinnings of other sciences and technology. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Prerequisite: MATH 165 and admission to the honors program or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of instructor.

PHYS 222. General Physics II. 5 Hours.

Electricity; Gauss' laws and potential difference; magnetism; MAxwell's equations; optics; introduction to Modern Physics. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 221. Corequisite: MATH 166.

PHYS 222H. Honors General Physics II. 5 Hours.

Electricity; Gauss' laws and potential difference; magnetism; Maxwell's equations; optics; introduction to modern physics. Emphasis on sophisticated quantitative reasoning, order of magnitude estimation, in-depth application of calculus, and physical inderpinnings of other sciences and technology. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours; recitation, 2 hours. Corequisite: MATH 166 Prequisite: Honors program admission.

PHYS 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

PHYS 394. Independent Study General Phys. 1-4 Hour.

PHYS 397. Spec Prob In Physics. 1-2 Hour.

3/94 Dropped Q For Pre Req Purposes.

PHYS 494. Independent Study Honors Phys. 1-8 Hour.

PHYS 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

POLS Courses

POLS 95. Political Science Experience. 0 Hours.

POLS 095 - Political Science Experience provides students with a diverse selection of applied experiences to gain more critical understand of a variety of political and cultural topics at all levels - International, National, State and Local. The experience requires students to actively engage in the political process - broadly defined. It is designed to fulfill the IP2 requirements of General Education.

POLS 115. American Government. 3 Hours.

Principles of American government, political behavior, institutions.

POLS 116. State and Local Government. 3 Hours.

Structures, politics, and behavior in state and local governments.

POLS 220. International Politics. 3 Hours.

Re-Activated 11-21-04.

POLS 275. Contemporary Community Issues. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to develop your understanding of the different communities you are a member of and the issues facing them in the 21st century. Drawing on theories and concepts from various disciplines, we will expand on how communities and the issues associated with them are defined, constructed and addressed at multiple levels of society. Specifically, we will examine various political and social issues facing our communities including but not limited to: crime, ecology, inequalities, health care and the family. We will also set those issues in their larger state, national and global context, address the impact of that context and the proposed possible outcomes for the future.

POLS 299. Special Topics. 1-6 Hour.

POLS 306. -Constitutional Law. 3 Hours.

-Inactivated 02/16/2017. Analyzes US Supreme Court decisions and interpretations which focuses on civil liberties, equal protections, due process and first amendment rights. Prerequisite: Student must complete POLS 115 before enrolling in this class.

POLS 325. Graphic Novels and Politics. 3 Hours.

Graphic Novels - like any form of social commentary - has a history of addressing the politics of the day. This course will take critical look at how the Graphic Novels have addressed the political and civic issues today and historically. Drawing on primary source materials and analytical texts, the course examines not only how civic issues and politics shape Graphic Novels, but also how Graphic Novels impact larger civic and political discussions.

POLS 375. Contemporary Political Issues. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to develop your understanding of the larger political world and the issues facing it in the 21st century. Drawing on theories and concepts from various disciplines, we will expand on how political issues are defined, constructed and addressed at multiple levels of society. Specifically, we will look at various political issues and policies facing the United States, including but not limited to: crime, ecology, inequalities, health care and the family. We will also set those issues in their larger global context, address the impact of that context and the proposed possible outcomes for the future.

POLS 394. Independent Study General Ps. 1-4 Hour.

POLS 451. Political Sociology. 3 Hours.

Political sociology broadly conceived is the study of power and domination in social relationships to include the relationship between state and society. The course draws upon comparative history to analyze socio-political trends and thereby includes the analysis of the family, the mass media, universities, trade unions, etc. A typical research question might, for example, be: what factors explain why so few American citizens choose to vote.

POLS 494. Independent Study Honors Ps. 1-8 Hour.

POLS 499. Special Topics In Political Sci. 1-6 Hour.

SCI Courses

SCI 95. Interconnecting Perspectives in Science. 0 Hours.

Science 095 examines how to present important scientific concepts to students from a diversity of backgrounds including different cultures, different learning styles, different ages, different genders, different physical abilities and different intellectual abilities.

SCI 102. Introduction to Radiologic Technology. 1 Hour.

Designed to acquaint first year student (freshman) radiologic technology students with the depth and breadth of this field. Students visit the radiology department of a local hospital. The course is presented by the education coordinator of a local school of radiologic technology. Lecture, 1 hour.

SCI 240. Research Methods. 2 Hours.

This course will introduce students to library skills, computer skills and comminication skills used to plan and carry out research projects. Studentd will search for, read, adn discuss journal articles; write and edit project proposals; and learn basic data management and analysis skills. Prerequisite: sophomore, junior, or senior status.

SCI 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

SCI 301. Biogeochemical Cycles. 3 Hours.

A broad overview of global biogeochemical process, including the origin of elements, Earth evolution, evolution of biogeochemical cycles, biogeochemical cycles of major elements such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur, cycles of select trace elements, interactions of biogeochemical cycles, biogeochemistry of various ecosystems, and environmental biogeochemistry. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisite: Student must take BIOL 127, CHEM 127, or GEOL 127 before enrolling in this course.

SCI 391. Teaching Science in Secondary Schools. 3 Hours.

Study of science teaching in middle school and high school grades with emphasis on clinical experience. Basic techniques for all disciplines are individualized in practice. Emphasis on teaching an investigative approach to science. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

SCI 394. Independent Study General Sci. 1-4 Hour.

SCI 405. Radiologic Technology Clinical. 6-15 Hour.

Students spend 24 months in a hospital environment. Education includes both didactic and clinical studies. Restricted to students who have been admitted to the Radiologic Technology degree program.

SCI 426. Elementary Science Methods. 4 Hours.

Study of basic concepts of science within a framework of elementary school teaching methodology. Interpretation of science content, learning theory, curriculum approaches, instructional strategies, and lesson planning are emphasized. Includes entensive clinical experience. Lecture, 4 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320. Corequisites: ED 320, 421, 422, 423, 424.

SCI 480. Seminar. 3 Hours.

Students present and discuss original student research project in both written and oral forms. To enroll, students must have completed their research and must have written the Introduction, Methods, and Results components of the research paper. Time in this course is also dedicated to a review of fundamental aspects of the discipline of their major and successful completion of a comprehensive exam. Prerequisites: senior status; and 2 credits of CHEM 494 or GEOL 494, or permission of instructors.

SCI 494. Independent Study Honors Sci. 1-8 Hour.

SCI 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

SOC Courses

SOC 110. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the basic insight, concepts, theories and methods of the discipline. The course encourages students to think critically, to apply sociological knowledge, and to develop a global perspective. Topics for discussion include culture, social interaction, deviance, sexuality, stratification, race relations, gender, family, economics, politics, technology, and social change. SOC 110 is a prerequisite for all 300 and 400 level SOC courses.

SOC 200H. Idea of Society. 3 Hours.

The idea of society is perhaps one of the most difficult abstractions in our repertoire. This course introduces the student to various perspectives that seek to explain both the historical and contemporary meaning of society. Honors Program admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of the instructor is required.

SOC 201. Social Problems. 3 Hours.

A sociological analysis of major social problems.

SOC 210. Introduction to Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Examination of customs, institutions, and social organization of preliterate societies. Brief consideration of physical and biological aspects of human development.

SOC 252. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Study of criminal behavior, including the nature and causes of crime, and of official responses to criminal law violations. Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 255. Changing American Family. 3 Hours.

An introduction to diverse family issues and concerns in American society. The course examines the changing functions, patterns and structures of the family as a major socail institution. Topics include changing patterns of dating, mate selection, cohabitation, marriage, dual career families, adoption, divorce, and remarriage.

SOC 269. Culture and Sexuality. 3 Hours.

This course will examine ethical, cultural, psychological, social, and political issues related to sexual relationships and sexual behavior. Specific issues covered include sexual consent and sexual responsibility; harassment and freedom of speech; privacy; censorship and pornography; impact of media on sexual relationships; and university and governmental regulation of intimate relationships, such as interracial relationships and student-professor relationship. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H.

SOC 275. Contemporary Community Issues. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to develop your understanding of the different communities you are a member of and the issues facing them in the 21st century. Drawing on theories and concepts from various disciplines, we will expand on how communities and the issues associated with them are defined, constructed and addressed at multiple levels of society. Specifically, we will examine various political and social issues facing our communities including but not limited to: crime, ecology, inequalities, health care and the family. We will also set those issues in their larger state, national and global context, address the impact of that context and the proposed possible outcomes for the future.

SOC 278. Social Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Study of the basic methods of empirical social science research. Topics include techniques and theory of research design, formulating and testing hypotheses, measurements, sampling, modes of observation, data management, and elementary data analysis.

SOC 280. Social Movement & Human Right. 3 Hours.

This course examines the complex relationship between social movements and human rights. Primary emphasis will be given to how grassroot movements/mobilizations have both shaped and contested our modern conceptions and practices of human rights in the US and globally. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H.

SOC 299. Special Topics in Sociology. 1-8 Hour.

This is a flexible course that may be taught depending on student needs. The design of the course is to present the student an opportunity to concentrate on various topics.

SOC 325. Environmental Sociology. 3 Hours.

This course examines the interrelationship between our community, culture, society and the global environment. Students will become engaged in diverse environmental projects, discussions and debates on eco-feminism, bio-diversity, bio-piracy, environmental degradation and future sustainability. Students will complete a final project that provides suggestions, recommendations and solutions to environmental preservation in the future.

SOC 357. Sociology of Religion. 3 Hours.

A sociological analysis of religious belief, behavior, organization, and the relation between religion as an institution and the larger society of which it is a part. Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 361. Comparative Ethnic Studies. 3 Hours.

Examination of the social, political, legal, and economic development of ethnic inequality in our American society. Topics include prejudice and discrimination, majority and minority relations, institutionalized racism, intergroup contacts, migration, immigration, affirmative action and equal opportunity programs. Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 363. Sociology of Gender. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the social, political, legal, and economic dimensions of contemporary women's issues. Topics include the feminization of poverty, reproductive technology, single parenthood, childcare policies, aggression against women, and institutionalized sexism. Prerequsite: SOC 110.

SOC 369. Studies in Deviance. 3 Hours.

This course examines how so-called deviant identities, communities, desires, and practices are socially, historically, and culturally constructed. Particular emphasis is placed on non-traditional forms of deviancy. Discussion topics include transgender issues, queer theory, body modification, religious fanaticism, and militia groups. Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 374. Cultural Studies. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the dynamics of culture and its impact on global change. Areas covered include: institutional structures of culture, cultural history and legacies, production and distribution of culture, effects of culture on meaning and social action. Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 375. Social Change and Development. 3 Hours.

Designed to familiarize students woth the theories, methods, adn analytical frameworks for understanding social change and development in a global context. Topics covered include gender and race/ethnicity issues, social movements, and collective behavior, economic development, and globalization. Prerequisites: SOC 110 and three credits of Sociology.

SOC 376. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Study of the social sources and patterns of the aging perception, attribution, socialization, and interpersonal interaction. Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 394. Independent Study General Soc. 1-4 Hour.

SOC 399. Senior Readings. 1-6 Hour.

Intended for students close to completing their major/minor sociology requirements. This course provides a forum for students to test the knowledge and skills they have acquired throughout their course of study by re-examining specific issues pertinent to sociology. Topics to be discussed range from civic, political, and religious participation through race, ethnicity, and gender issues. Prerequisites: SOC 110, three credits of sociology, and consent of instructor.

SOC 401. Research/Practicum/Internship. 1-6 Hour.

The course allows students the option of developing a major paper involving a literature review or empirical research or placement in applied setting for practical experience. Community and/or campus settings are available.Prerequisite: Student must complete SOC 110 OR SOC 200H before enrolling in the class.

SOC 420. Drugs & Society. 3 Hours.

An examination of public policy and the social construction of drugs and drug use. Includes the history of drug legislation, the interactional experiences of drug users, harm reduction and rehabilitation vs. criminalization, social effects, drug culture, and legalization debates. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H.

SOC 451. Political Sociology. 3 Hours.

Political sociology broadly conceived is the study of power and domination in social relationships to include the relationship between state and society. The course draws upon comparative history to analyze socio-political trends and thereby includes the analysis of the family, the mass media, universities, trade unions, etc. A typical research question might, for example, be: what factors explain why so few American citizens choose to vote.

SOC 476. Theory Construction & App. 3 Hours.

Course is based on a basic understanding of the properties, limitations, and applications of theory is important not only to producers of sociological knowledge but also as consumers of that knowledge. The goal of the class is develop an understanding of sociological theory by exploring some of the basic theoretical orientations sociologists use in studying social phenomena and some of the specific theories based on these orientations. By considering criteria appropriate for evaluating these orientations and the theories developed from them. And exploring the different ways that a sociological theory may and may not be used in resolving social problems. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H.

SOC 477. Sociological Theory. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the major nineteenth and twentieth century thinkers who shaped the development of sociological thought. In exploring the theoretical heritage of sociology, the course seeks to develop an appreciation of what theory is and how necessary and useful it is for examining and understanding the social world. A major assumption of the course is that sociological theory has an eminently practical function for understanding ourselves and the world we live in. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or SOC 200H and SOC 476.

SOC 494. Independent Study Honors Soc. 1-8 Hour.

SOC 499. Special Topics in Sociology. 1-8 Hour.

This is a flexible course that may be taught depending on student needs. The design of the course is to present the student an opportunity to concentrate on various topics.

SPAN Courses

SPAN 101. Beginning Spanish I. 4 Hours.

For beginners or those entering with one or two years of high school Spanish. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture.

SPAN 102. Beginning Spanish II. 4 Hours.

A continuation of Beginning Spanish I. Prerequisite: SPAN 101.

SPAN 120. Basic Spanish for Travel and Business. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to help students attain basic business conversation skills in Spanish. It will also provide a broad introduction to Spanish grammar and also cultural insight to business practices in the Spanish speaking world. Current events and topics related to the Hispanic World will also be discussed.

SPAN 194. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of Spanish. Pre-requisite: Spanish or Spanish Education major or minor.

SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish I. 4 Hours.

Review of basic Spanish with increased practice in conversation, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: SPAN 102, three years of high school Spanish, or consent of instructor.

SPAN 202. Intermediate Spanish II. 4 Hours.

Continuation of SPAN 201. Prerequisite: SPAN 201.

SPAN 220. Hispanic Cinema. 3 Hours.

An exploration of socio-cultural, historical, and political issues in non-mainstream Hispanic cinema. Supplementary readings in English translation. Films projected in Spanish, with English subtitles. Taught in English.

SPAN 296. Study Tour. 1-3 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. Does not count towards the Spanish or Spanish Education major or minor.

SPAN 299. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of Hispanic language, literature, culture, and civilization. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

SPAN 340. Conversation & Composition I. 3 Hours.

Advanced practice in oral and written skills using cultural readings and other media. Prerequisite: Student must complete SPAN 202 or have the consent of the instructor before enrolling in this class.

SPAN 341. Conversation & Composition II. 3 Hours.

This is one of a pair of courses focusing on advanced practice in oral and written skills using cultural readings and other media. Prerequisite: Student must complete SPAN 202 or have the consent of the instructor before enrolling in this class.

SPAN 342. Introduction to Hispanic Literature. 3 Hours.

Designed to improve language skills with an emphasis on reading and to enhance the student's ability to understand literature. Includes study of poetry, drama, and narrative from the Spanish speaking world. Prerequisite: SPAN 341 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 343. Contemporary Hispanic Culture. 3 Hours.

Readings in culture and society of the Spanish speaking world.

SPAN 394. Independent Study. 1-4 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of Spanish. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

SPAN 395. Service Learning. 3 Hours.

Students will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate (a) personal community or global service experience(s). Pre-requisites: Spanish or Spanish Education major or minor.

SPAN 399. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of Spanish. Pre-requisite: Spanish or Spanish Education major or minor. Repeatable for credit as topics change.

SPAN 441. Hispanic Literature. 3 Hours.

Survey of the literature of the Spanish speaking world. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 342 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 443. Senior Thesis In Spanish. 3 Hours.

SPAN 450. Spanish Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

Individual research project on a cultural topic approved by the instructor one semester prior to enrollment in the course. Course restricted to majors.

SPAN 496. Study Tour. 1-18 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. May count towards the Spanish or Spanish Education major or minor.

SS Courses

SS 283. Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in America. 3 Hours.

This course examines the historical development of American ethnic and cultural diversity, including Native American, and places that diversity in global perspective. This course meets the Education Standards and Practices Board (ESPB) Native American Studies requirement for teacher certification.

SS 299. Special Topics In Social Science. 1-8 Hour.

SS 391. Secondary History/Social Science Teaching Methods. 3 Hours.

A methods course designed for those intending to teach history and social studies at the secondary level. The course includes a study of classroom techniques, a microteaching experience, and a practicum in a secondary level socal classroom. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. (Offered fall semester only.).

SS 394. Independent Study General Ss. 1-4 Hour.

SS 398. Secondary Hist/Soc Sci Practicum. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to give History and Social Science education majors an opportunity to have thirty hours of practical experience. Placements in school settings are arranged by the Teacher advisement and Field Placement Office. Co-requisite: SS 391. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, SS 391, or departmental approval, and History Education and Social Science Education majors.

SS 399. Readings in Social Science. 1-3 Hour.

Study and discussion of readings in social science, particularly those which cross discciplinary lines.

SS 494. Independent Study Honors Ss. 1-8 Hour.

SS 499. Special Topics In Social Science. 1-8 Hour.

SWK Courses

SWK DIV. Social Work Diversity. 99.00 Hours.

Used for incoming BSC courses for the social work program.

SWK ELE. SWK Elective. 0.5-99 Hour.

SWK PHIL. Social Work Philosophy Credit. 999.00 Hours.

Used in place of a transferred course to count for the philosophy requirement for social work.

SWK 250. Interpersonal Skills. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to develop verbal and nonverbal interpersonal skills related to common, everyday interactions as well as those interactions germane to the Generalist Practice Planned Change Process. The course requires 25 hours of concurrent interpersonal skill building human service experience.

SWK 256. Development of Social Welfare. 3 Hours.

The course reviews and evaluates the history, philosophical assumptions, values and development of social welfare programs and services throughout the United States. The course examines the socio-political-economic conditions which not only form, but influence social welfare systems. In addition, the course discusses intersections between privilege and oppression. The course reviews multiple marginalized, oppressed , and underserved populations with which social work intersects and ways that social work can positively impact social, economic, environmental justice, and human rights.

SWK 285. Child Welfare in Rural Comm. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the basic core of child welfare services: Services to protect children from neglect and abuse, family preservation services, foster care, adoption, and child advocacy. Additionally, it will examine the legal freamework that governs the affairs of children.

SWK 299. Special Topics In Social Work. 1-4 Hour.

SWK 330. Human Behavior and the Social Environment. 3 Hours.

This course reviews the biopsycho-social-cultural aspects of human development across the life span within the context of Generalist Practice. Students will apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to provide social work across the life span. Prerequisite: Student must complete SWK 250, SOC 110, and PSY 111 before enrolling in this class.

SWK 331. Family Dynamics. 3 Hours.

This course applies a variety of theoretical perspectives, including systems theory and person-in-environment in order to use skills to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate social work practice with families.

SWK 335. Social Work Methods I. 3 Hours.

This course applies knowledge, values, and skills for entry level Generalist Practice Social Work with individuals and families using evidence-based skills and interventions. Students will develop skills to engage, assess, plan, intervene, and evaluate social work practice with individuals and families. Prerequisites: SWK 331 and admission to the Social Work Program.

SWK 340. Social Welfare Policy. 3 Hours.

A generalist practice framework is used for the analysis of social welfare policies and current policy structures, and policy practice, advocacy, and evaluation used in agency, community, and legislative settings.

SWK 350. Rural Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Study and evaluation of rural, regional social services and delivery systems, characteristics of rural populations and community analysis, function and roles of social worker in a nonmetropolitan environment. Prerequisite: SWK 250, 255 and 256.

SWK 379. Aging Practices and Policies. 3 Hours.

Study of social welfare policies which sanction and direct services and welfare for the elderly.

SWK 394. Independent Study General Sw. 1-4 Hour.

SWK 401. Contemporary Issues with Native American Families. 3 Hours.

This course will survey contemporary issues that Native American families face in today's society and how these influence effect the context of family life and the helping process.

SWK 402. N.A. Children & Adolescents. 3 Hours.

This course will survey contemporary issues that Native American children and adolescents experience in today's society and how these issues affect their family life and issues relatd to delivery of services.

SWK 426. Social Work Methods II. 3 Hours.

this course applies knowledge, values, and skills for generalist social work practice with groups using evidence-based skills and interventions. Students will develop and utilize skills to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate social work practice with groups. Prerequisites: SWK 340 and admission to the Social Work Program.

SWK 427. Social Work Methods III. 3 Hours.

This course applies knowledge, values, and skills for generalist social work practice with organizations and communities using evidence-based skills and interventions. Students will develop and utilize skills to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate social work practice with organizations and communities. Pre-requisites: SWK 330, 331, and Admission to the Social Work Program.

SWK 428. Crisis Intervention. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of crisis intervention with an emphasis on the use of short-term intervention and problem-solving techniques. This course emphasizes crisis theory and crisis intervention models applied to various crisis problems and populations at-risk. Pre-requisiste: Junior or Senior status.

SWK 429. Interprofessional Health Care Practice. 3 Hours.

Today's fast-paced, high acuity health care system demands health care professionals who can collaborate effectively using an interprofessional team approach in order to provide patient-centered care. Students will explore discipline specific roles and scope of practice as well as issues common to all health care professions such as communication, team dynamics, ethics, patient safety, and quality improvement. Pre-requisites: SWK 250, 256, 330, 331, 335, and 340.

SWK 430. Diversity, Oppression, and Social Change. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on enhancing knowledge and insight into the impact of oppressed individuals to include, but not limited to age, color disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender national origin, race, and sexual orientation. To promote self-awareness, a key component in cross-cultural social work practice, students will be challenged to thoughtfully and critically analyze their own identity development by examining personal beliefs and life-experiences with privilege and oppression. The person-in-environment assessment strategy will be applied as practical intervention strategy for future practice with diverse individuals. Pre-requisites: SWK 250, 256, 330, 331, 335, and 340. Co-requisite: SWK 426.

SWK 442. Research Methods in Social Work. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the concepts and principles of social work research methodology. This course includes conceptualizing a social work problem, designing research strategy, making use of relevant literature, and organizing and evaluating relevant data. Prerequisite(s): MATH 210 or PSY 241.

SWK 489. Field Experience. 3-9 Hour.

Field experience is a course that provides structured and educationally directed learning experiences in public and private human service agencies, but is geared for those students who may want an additional field experience prior to Field Education. Pre-requisite: Admission to the Social Work program and consent of instructor.

SWK 490. Field Education. 12 Hours.

This course is a structurally and educationally directed learning experience in public and private human service agencies that utilizes social work knowledge, values, and skills. Pre-requisite: Admission to the Social Work program. Co-requisite: SWK 491.

SWK 491. Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

The Senior Seminar course taken concurrently with Field Education promotes the integration of knowledge, values, and skills and filed learning with a focus on professional and ethical issues. Co-requisites: SWK 490 and senior status.

SWK 494. Independent Study Honors Sw. 1-8 Hour.

SWK 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

THEA Courses

THEA 95. Theatre Experience. 0 Hours.

Students will produce, direct, manage, design, build, perform, and market a family/youth production. The ultimate goal is to either invite area schools to the performances in the Aleshire Theatre or to tour the production to the area schools.

THEA 110. Introduction to Theatre Arts. 3 Hours.

Basic introduction to the theory and principles of theatrical presentation including dramatic literature, acting, stagecraft and dramatic analysis, with emphasis on practical application.

THEA 120. Intro to Drama Lit & Analysis. 3 Hours.

An introductory course in the literature of drama. Plays representative of important periods of theatre history are discussed and analyzed in their cultural context as well as for possible performance. Students work to understand the plays' potential meanings for modern audiences.

THEA 121. The One-Act Play. 2 Hours.

The course revolves around the study of the one-act play, how it differs from the full length play, as well as the reading of several one-acts and evaluating them as per their availability and appropriateness for competition.

THEA 161. Acting I. 3 Hours.

A basic introduction to script analysis, scene work, and characterization. Exploring the actors tools through voice, movement, and stage combat may be implemented depending on instructor.

THEA 162. Audition Techniques. 1 Hour.

The selection, rehearsal, and performance of theatrical scenes and monologues as well as musical theatre material for the purpose of auditions.

THEA 164. Musical Theatre Professional Preparation. 2 Hours.

Designed to prepare students to be successful at professional Musical Theatre auditions and to provide them with practical skills and information related to show business (i.e: agents, managers, unions, negotiating, contracts, headshots, resumes, casting directors, etc.).

THEA 194. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of theatre. Pre-requisite: Theatre Arts major or minor.

THEA 199. Special Topics. 1-3 Hour.

Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of theatre.

THEA 201. Theatre Practicum. 1 Hour.

Paricipation in a significant capacity in any communication arts sponsored theatrical production above and beyond the requirements of a specific course. Repeatable up to eight credits.

THEA 202. KCACTF Participation. 1 Hour.

Credit offered to those students selected for the KCACTF Irene Ryan Regional Scholarships as well as those students choosing to actively participate in the various regional events, i.e. Design Expo, Stage Management, Theatre Management Challenge, and those students interested in presenting work else where. The course will include selection, preparation, and presentation of the required artifacts or audition pieces.

THEA 203. Music Theatre Studio. 1 Hour.

Performance of major roles of Musical Theatre in studio projects. Emphasis on the student's integration of singing, acting, and movement into a unified performance.

THEA 221. Costuming. 2 Hours.

Introduction to the art of theatrical costuming from history through construction. Included will be an introduction to the design process.

THEA 222. Make-Up. 2 Hours.

Theory and practical laboratory work in stage make-up applications, including mask building.

THEA 250. Creative Drama. 3 Hours.

The study fo creativity, and the relationshop of drama and creative play culminating with activities centering around storytelling and children's theatre.

THEA 261. Performance Studies. 3 Hours.

An examination of "performativity." and explorations of performance beyond the confines of "theatre proper". Students will create works for the theatre which resist the limits of traditional narrative as well as experiment with the definition of performance.

THEA 270. Stagecraft. 3 Hours.

The course will begin with the stage managers approach to script analysis for a play in production and will conclude with the fundamental approach to the implementation of the scenic artist¿s designs for the stage through the study of set construction, painting techniques, and technical coordination.

THEA 275. Production Design. 3 Hours.

The focus of the course will be design process, as applied to the creation of the theatrical environment, including analysis, research, communication, and implementation. Students will complete design projects in costuming, scenery, or lighting. Prerequisite(s): THEA 270.

THEA 296. Study Tour. 1-3 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. Does not count toward the Theater Arts major or minor.

THEA 297. Internship. 1-2 Hour.

Hands-on experience in the discipline.

THEA 299. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

THEA 301. Movement I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to physical and movement elements of the actor's craft and stage performance, including neutral presence, alignment, walking, spatial awareness, self-awareness, and availability. Exercises will be given to strengthen and stretch the body. Techniques involving the application of yoga, pilates, ballet and Viewpoints will be applied to physical expression in character development and creation of object and animal essences. No previous fitness/movement training required, only a quest for play and healthier daily living.

THEA 302. Movement II. 3 Hours.

Participants will develop body awareness, improve posture, enhance muscle strength, increase range of motion, and further the art of muscle relaxation. Implementation and continuation of yoga/pilates matwork and ballet will increase strength, coordination, and flexibility for the stage performer. Final project will involve movement application with classical Shakespearean text. No previous fitness/movement training required, only a quest for play and healthier daily living.

THEA 303. Musical Theatre Dance. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic principles and techniques characteristic of tap, jazz, and musical theatre dance styles. Warm-up, exercises, combinations in a variety of jazz and tap styles will provide opportunities for the student to develop an efficient use of weight, alignment, flexibility, articulation of footwork, coordination, endurance, strength, and musicality. A fun-filled class that culminates in song and dance routines for the stage.

THEA 305. Musical Theatre History. 3 Hours.

History of Musical Theatre, primarily focusing on American Musical Theatre, from its defining influences and roots to the present. Topics to be covered include significant productions, composers, lyricists, librettists, choreographers, directors, designers, and actors.

THEA 350. Theatre History, Criticism & Literature I. 3 Hours.

A survey of the development of the theatre and drama, including dramatic analysis, performance theory and style, theater architecture, and individual contributions, from its beginning to 1642. Prerequisite: Student must complete THEA 120 or have instructor consent before enrolling in this class.

THEA 351. Theatre History Criticism,& Literature II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of THEA 350 and the development of the theatre and drama, including dramatic analysis, performance theory and style, theatre architecture, and individual contributions, from 1642 to the present. Prerequisite: Student must complete THEA 120 or have instructor consent before enrolling in this class.

THEA 361. Acting II. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of modern trends in acting technique with special emphasis placed upon the creation of character through various acting styles, and continued emphasis on voice and movement. Prerequisite: Student must complete THEA 161 or have the consent of the instructor before enrolling in this class.

THEA 385. Directing. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of composition and picturization, blocking, stage business, and rehearsal as applied to the directing of plays. Prerequisite: THEA 161 or consent of instructor.

THEA 386. Playwriting. 3 Hours.

A study of the basic principles of writing for the stage. Emphasis will be on developing short forms of productions, specifically the ten-minute play.

THEA 387. Playwrights Lab. 1 Hour.

Development of original student-written plays. Focus will be on revision of 10-minute scripts for production. Prerequisite: Student must complete THEA 386 or have the consent of the instructor before enrolling in this class.

THEA 394. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent or directed study of special topics in the study of theatre. Pre-requisite: Theatre Arts major or minor.

THEA 395. Service Learning. 3 Hours.

Students will utilize reflection and research (both primary and secondary) to integrate (a) personal community or global service experience(s). Pre-requisite: Theatre Art major or minor.

THEA 399. Special Topics. 1-3 Hour.

Varying areas of content, issues, or themes in the study of theatre.

THEA 401. Tour Show. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for the both the Theater and non-Theater major/minor to acquaint the student with the basic principles of acting, stage work, and touring. These principles include, but are not limited to: script reading and analysis; a technical production process that would accommodate a limited budget and specifics to be performed in various spaces and conditions; the research and preparation of materials that would allow a non- traditional audience member and teacher to view the production and be able to incorporate performance materials back into a regular classroom activity.

THEA 414. Theatre Management. 3 Hours.

This course will emphasize the business of theatre: Production Procedures from beginning to the end; grant writing, box office procedures, publicity policies, and audience development. Prerequsite: BADM 301.

THEA 450. Contemporary Drama. 3 Hours.

A study of dramatic literature from 1952 to the present. Plays from England, Europe, and the Americas will be represented. Course may be repeated as the content changes.

THEA 480. Advanced Theatre Performance. 3 Hours.

The focus of the course may include: script analysis, dramaturgy, devising theatre, and vocal technique for the stage (including diction, pronunciation, and dialect as needed). Students will do a variety of projects leading to production concepts as discussed by the ensemble. The final project will be a finished theatrical performance directed and acted by class members. Prerequisites: THEA 161, 301, 361, and 385.

THEA 496. Study Tour. 1-3 Hour.

MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit. Does not count towards the Theatre Arts major or minor.

THEA 499. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

UNIV Courses

UNIV 110. First Year Seminar. 2-3 Hour.

An academic course linked to two other courses to form a first-year experience learning community. The course should inspire and support the transition to university life and learning and provide opportunities to engage with the campus and larger community. Topics vary according to the theme of the learning community.

WS Courses

WS 294. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Directed topics of study.

WS 299. Special Topics. 1-3 Hour.

Special topics in Women's Studies.

WS 494. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Directed topics of study.

WS 499. Special Topics. 1-3 Hour.

Special Topics in Women's Studies.

ACCT Courses

ACCT 200. Elements of Accounting I. 3 Hours.

Basic principles of the complete accounting cycle with emphasis on current assets; property, plant, and equipment; and current liabilities. Prerequisite: MATH 103.

ACCT 201. Elements of Accounting II. 3 Hours.

A continuation course of ACCT 200 with emphasis on partnerships, corporations, and management accounting. Prerequisite: Student must complete ACCT 200 before enrolling in this class.

ACCT 299. Special Topics In Accounting. 1-8 Hour.

ACCT 300. Legal Environment of Business. 3 Hours.

Includes the nature and function of law; contracts and private property as basic concepts in free enterprise; the legal system and evolution of attitudes and law regarding marketing functions and governmental regulation imposed on business activities. Prerequisite: Restricted to students with sophomore, junior or senior status.

ACCT 301. Intermediate Accounting I. 3 Hours.

Begins with a review of the accounting process and the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting. It proceeds to an in-depth study of cash, time value of money, receivables, and inventory. Prerequisites: ACCT 201 and BOTE 247.

ACCT 302. Intermediate Accounting II. 3 Hours.

Continues the intermediate sequence with in-depth coverage of operational assets (tangible and intangible), liabilites (current and long-term), stockholders equity, and investments. Prerequisite: ACCT 301.

ACCT 303. Intermediate Accounting III. 3 Hours.

ACCT 303 Intermediate Accounting III 3cr. Concludes the intermediate sequence with in-depth coverage of the statement of cash flow, pensions, and post retirement benefits, leases, earnings, per share, financial statement analysis, accounting for income taxes, accounting changes and error analysis, revenue rocognition, and financial reporting. Prerequisite: ACCT 302.

ACCT 315. Government/Not-For-Profit Accounting. 3 Hours.

Covers accounting principles for state and local governental units, universities, hospitals, and other not-for-profit organizations. Topics include budgetary accounting, the preparation of reports and statements, and the use of special funds. Prerequisite: Student must complete ACCT 301 before enrolling in this class.

ACCT 321. Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes structuring and analyzing accounting data for management decisions related to manufacturing, merchandising, and service entities. Prerequisite: Student must complete ACCT 201 before enrolling in this class. Corequisite: Student must complete BADM 301 before or at the same time as this course.

ACCT 322. Advanced Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours.

Addresses cost allocation, inventory methods, and concepts, process and activity based costing systems, standard costing, and performance measures. Prerequisite: ACCT 321.

ACCT 331. Business Law I. 3 Hours.

Topics include contracts (formation, performance, rights, and remedies), negotiable instruments, and legal matters relating to the finacail/banking community. Prerequisites: Junior or senior statues and consent of instructor. Prerequisite: Restricted to students with junior or senior status.

ACCT 332. Business Law II. 3 Hours.

Topics includes Uniform Commercial Code (Art. 2, sales contracts), Uniform Commercail Code (Art. 9, secured transactions), employment/agency law. Prerequisite: ACCT 331.

ACCT 351. Fraud Examination. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the skills necessary to detect, investigate, and prevent fraud, and white-collar crime. The material covered in this course should be of interest to accountants, auditors, fraud investigators, loss prevention specialists, attorneys, educators, criminologists, or business owners/managers. The purpose of this course is to 1) educate the student about both the pervasiveness of and the causes of fraud and white-collar crime in our society, 2) explore the methods of fraud detection, investigation, and prevention, and 3)increase the student's ability to detect material financial statement fraud. Prerequisite: ACCT 200.

ACCT 360. Accounting Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes how accounting informaiton systems function in today's business environment. Manual and computer systems will be used to study the processes and procedures by which an organization's financial information is accumulated, classified, processed, analyzed, and communicated. Topics include business cycles, controls, integrated accounting software, spreadsheets, and relational databases. Prerequisites: Students must complete ACCT 201 and BOTE 247 before enrolling in this class.

ACCT 375. Principles of Energy Accounting. 3 Hours.

Provides a study of the accounting and taxation principles and theories relating to the energy industry. The course will focus on specific accounting entries, presentation on and impact to financial statements, and taxation concepts relating to oil, gas, and other energy companies. Prerequisite: ACCT 201.

ACCT 394. Independent Study General Acct. 1-4 Hour.

ACCT 401. Advanced Accounting I. 3 Hours.

Advanced Accounting I addresses issues related to business combonations and consolidated financial statements as well as partnership accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 302.

ACCT 411. Taxation of Individuals. 3 Hours.

Provides a study of federal taxation principles and theories relating to individuals with emphasis on the determination of gross income and taxable income. Taxation of self-employment income will be examined and taxation of property transactions is introduced. Students apply these principles by preparing federal income tax returns, and by performing tax research. Prerequisite: Student must complete ACCT 201 before enrolling in this class.

ACCT 412. Taxation of Property Transactions and Business Entities. 3 Hours.

Provides a study of federal taxation principles and theories relating to corporations, partnerships, LLCs and S Corporations. Taxation of property transactions will be studied thoroughly. Students will apply these principles by preparing various types of federal income tax returns and by performing tax research and tax planning. Prerequisite: Student must complete ACCT 411 before enrolling in this class.

ACCT 415. Energy Law. 3 Hours.

Energy Law is an ever-changing discipline that emphasizes how both individuals and businesses interact with the law related to the energy industry on a day-to-day basis. This course will focus on the relationships between energy corporations and the individual land owner or service provider as well as the relationships between environmental laws and production. Prerequisite: Student must complete ACCT 300 before enrolling in this class.

ACCT 430. Auditing/Assurance Concepts & Practices. 3 Hours.

Introduces audit theory, standards, responsibilities, and processes. Study of audit principles and practices including evidence gathering, internal controls, sampling and testing, report writing, ethics and legal liabilities. Prerequisite: Student must complete ACCT 302 before enrolling in this class.

ACCT 431. Advanced Auditing & Assurance. 3 Hours.

Discusses compilations, reviews, examinations and other assurance services. Explores contemporary auditing and assurance issues. Prerequisite: Student must complete ACCT 430 and MATH 210 before enrolling in this class.

ACCT 480. Controllership. 3 Hours.

Examines the role of a controller as a vital member of an organization's management team. Students exercise judgement in solving accounting-related problems by synthesizing and applying knowledge gained from previous business coursework. Focus will be placed on cost management, budgeting, organizational behavior, ethics, cash management, policy-making, internal control, performance measurement, compensation and benefits accounting information systems, and tax compliance. Prerequisites: Student must complete ACCT 321, ACCT 430, have senior status and complete the College of Business core courses before enrolling in this class.

ACCT 494. Independent Study Honors Acct. 1-8 Hour.

ACCT 495. Seminars in Leadership Development. 3 Hours.

Special topics in leadership including concepts, principles, and processes to facilitate effective, compassionate, and ethical leadership within the leader/follower relationship. The course will the relevance of self-awareness, self-management, environmental situations, social awareness and responsibility, and relationship management in authentic leadership. Prerequisites: Restricted to College of Business majors and minors and students with junior or senior status. Instructor consent is required.

ACCT 497. Accounting Internship. 2-12 Hour.

Refers to supervised professional experience in public, industrial, governmental, or non-profit accounting. Students must meet standards set by both the employer and the Accounting Department. A maximum of 2 credits count toward the major with the remaining credits counting as electives. This course is restricted to accounting majors. Consent of program coordinator required.

ACCT 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offering and current topics.

BADM Courses

BADM 101. Introduction to Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

Introduces fundamental concepts of entrepreneurship. Students will develop an understanding of the entrepreneurial mindset and core entrepreneurship competencies. Explores current issues and trends in entrepreneurship.

BADM 120. Fundamentals of Business. 3 Hours.

Students will develop an understanding of the abilities and skills required for success in future business and nonbusiness careers and endeavors within society. This course may not be taken by business majors during their final two semesters. An excellent course for beginning students and nonbusiness majors. Prerequisite: Restricted to freshman and sophomore students.

BADM 299. Special Topics In Bus Admin. 1-8 Hour.

BADM 301. Fundamentals of Management. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the nature of management , the evolution of management thought, strategic management and planning concepts, desision making and creative problem solving, and motivation and leadership in a changing environment. Pre-requisite: Sophomore status.

BADM 303. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

Includes personnel policies, programs, and procedures, standards, employment, staffing, wage and salary administration, personnel laws, and personnel research. Prerequisite: BADM 301.

BADM 304. Entrepreneurship/Small Business Management. 3 Hours.

Introductory entrepreneurship course intended to provide a solid foundation in terms of the vital role played by entrepreneurs, innovation, and creativity in the global economy. The various components of a business plan are introduced. this course is complemented at the end of the management program with the entrepreneurship and new venture creation course. Prerequisite: Student must complete BADM 301 and have junior status before enrolling in this class.

BADM 307. International Business. 3 Hours.

Introduces conceptual and operational problems of participating in international business. Coverage includes a study of managerial, marketing, financial, accounting, legal, economic, and cultural environments in foreign markets for the conduct of world business. Prerequisite: Student must complete BADM 301 and 321 before enrolling in this class.

BADM 309. Safety Management. 3 Hours.

Introduces safety management in the work place and its application to the law, OSHA, cost analysis, program organization, and safety program administration. Prerequisite: BADM 301.

BADM 321. Marketing. 3 Hours.

Acquaints students with the principles, concepts and perspectives underlying marketing functions, including the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of products, services, and ideas, and the role of marketing in society. Prerequisite: Restricted to students with sophomore status.

BADM 322. Professional Selling. 3 Hours.

Introduces the basic principles that underline selling and the steps in making a sale (prospecting, approaches, objections, presentations, demonstrations, closing). Practical illustrations and demonstrations are employed. Prerequisite: BADM 321.

BADM 324. Integrated Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

Acquaints students with the role of integrated marketing communications concepts and practices in enhancing the equity of brands, and provides thorough coverage of all aspects of an IMC program: advertising, promotions, packaging, and branding strategies, point of purchase communications, marketing oriented public relations, and event and cause oriented sponsorships. Prerequisite: BADM 321.

BADM 406. Professional Business Ethics. 3 Hours.

Studies of ethical issues faced by businesses including distributive justice, capitalism, decision-making, corporate responsibility, corporate morality, governance, whistle-blowing, hiring policies, codes of ethics, advertising, safety, pollution, and foreign business practices. Prerequisites: BADM 301 and senior status.

BADM 408. Negotiations. 3 Hours.

The study of negotiation to include framing, strategizing, planning, tactics, negotiating, and settlement. The course of study includes individual, orpanizational, and collective bargaining processes. It also includes practical applications of bargaining processes through group projects. Prerequisite: BADM 301.

BADM 416. Operations Management. 3 Hours.

Introduces the concepts, issues, and problems of operations management and the management of the production function. Problems are analyzed and solutions are recommended. Microcomputer applications are addressed. Prerequisite: Student must complete BOTE 247, ECON 201, MATH 210, and BADM 301 before enrolling in this course.

BADM 421. Applied Business Research. 3 Hours.

Explores the full range on activities involved in the marketing research process for business including research and measurement concept, sampling and field work, and data analysis and presentation. Prerequisites: BADM 321, MATH 240.

BADM 422. Consumer Behavior. 3 Hours.

Studies the consumer decision-making process in the purchase of goods and services. Emphasis is placed on developing and understanding the determinants of consumer behavior and the appropriate application of marketing strategies. Prerequisite: BADM 321 or permission of instructor.

BADM 424. Logistics & Channel Management. 3 Hours.

Explores channels of distribution considering behavioral, social, and economic aspects of the distribution system to include transportation, inventory management, order processing, purchasing, warehousing, material handling, packaging, customer service, and product scheduling. Prerequisite: BADM 321.

BADM 427. International Marketing. 3 Hours.

Introduces the essentials of conducting international marketing operations to include estimating market potential, developing entry strategies, and managing and controlling marketing programs. Prerequisite: BADM 321.

BADM 436. Organizational Behavior Principles and Practices. 3 Hours.

Includes the principles, concept, and processes that interpret human relations in management at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Prerequisite: BADM 303.

BADM 437. International Culture & Management. 3 Hours.

Examines the impact of culture on business practices and introduces the student to the management process in an international setting. Includes an examination of comparative systems and environmental conditions and their impact on management decisions. Prerequisite: Student must complete BADM 307 before enrolling in this class.

BADM 462. International Business Strategy. 3 Hours.

Provides an international business capstone experience. Case studies illustrating international business decisions and operations are emphasized. Prerequisite: BADM 307.

BADM 465. Strategic Management. 3 Hours.

Strategic management is an analysis of the objectives of business firms and the development and evaluation of strategies and policies designed to meet these objectives. Cases are emphasized. Prerequisite: Student must complete BADM 301, 321, and FIN 353 before enrolling in this class.

BADM 470. Projects in Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

Provides application of the skills acquired in previous entrepreneurship and College of Business courses through experiential coursework. Students will complete individual research culminating in a final portfolio project. The project will allow the opportunity to integrate the tools learned in the program to develop and detail their business venture. Prerequisites: Students must complete BADM 101 and BADM 304 prior to enrolling in this course.

BADM 488. Marketing Strategy. 3 Hours.

Management of marketing organizations and integration of functions, with emphasis on planning and designing strategies and applying tools and techniques for problem solving and decision making. Prerequisites: Student must complete BADM 321 and 421 before enrolling in this class.

BADM 489. Entrepreneurship and New Venture. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on entrepreneurship, new venture creation, and the completion of a business plan. The business plan applies principles, concepts, and a framework to real world situations. Prerequisites: Students must complete BADM 321, 304, FIN 353 and ACCT 321 before enrolling in this class.

BADM 495. Seminars in Leadership Develop. 3 Hours.

Special topics in leadership including concepts, principles, and processes to facilitate effective, compassionate, and ethical leadership within the leader/follower relationship. The course will the relevance of self-awareness, self-management, environmental situations, social awareness and responsibility, and relationship management in authentic leadership. Prerequisites: This course is restricted to College of Business majors and minors and students with junior or senior status. Instructor consent is required.

BADM 496. Study Abroad. 3 Hours.

MSU faculty-led trips to appropriate locations. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit for different countries.

BADM 497. Internship. 2-9 Hour.

A cooperative occupational course relevant to your BADM degree program. Maximum of 3 credits will count toward major. Prerequisite: Restricted to students who are International Business, Management, or Marketing majors.

BADM 498. -Management Capstone. 3 Hours.

- Inactivated 03/02/2017. This management capstone course is an integrative course that brings together the theory and practice of business school education. Prerequisites: BADM 416, BADM 489. Co-requisite: BADM 465.

BADM 499. Special Topics in Business Administration. 1-8 Hour.

Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.

BIT Courses

BIT 123. Technology-Personal Development. 3 Hours.

Introduction to technology for personal development. Emphasis placed on how to exploit technology to achieve goals and improve quality of life.

BIT 154. Word Processing & Presentation Software. 3 Hours.

Pre-requisites: Previous computer experience.

BIT 220. Management Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Designed to provide an introduction to systems and development concepts, technology acquisition, and various types of application software that have become prevalent or are emerging in modern organizations and society. Also introduces students to contemporary information systems and demonstrates how these systems are used throughout global organizations. The focus of this course is on the key components of information systems - people, software, hardware, data, and communication technology, and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantage.

BIT 235. Introduction to Web Site Design. 3 Hours.

Basics of web site design using HTML code and web editing software.

BIT 236. Business Design Tools. 3 Hours.

Hands-on computer course that surveys current software packages in the area of business designing tools. Offered on campus Fall even years and online Fall odd years.

BIT 299. Special Topics. 1-3 Hour.

BIT 310. IT Project Management. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to examine the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organizations use to manage their information systems projects utilizing a systematic methodology for initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing projects.

BIT 311. Collaborative Computing. 3 Hours.

Course explores collaboration within an organization, including establishment and maintenance of a collaborative culture, virtual team development and member roles, collaborative communication, and collaborative tools and technology. Prerequisite: Student must complete BIT 220 before enrolling in this class.

BIT 312. Data and Information Management. 3 Hours.

Provides the students with an introduction to the core concepts in data and information management. It is centered around the core skills of identifying organization information requirements, modeling them using conceptual data modeling techniques, converting the conceptual data modes into relational data models and verifying its structural characteristics with normalization techniques, and implementing and utilizing a relational database. Prerequisites: Students must complete BIT 220, 310, and 311 before enrolling in this course.

BIT 318. Business Communication. 3 Hours.

Focuses on oral, written and nonverbal communication skills used in business. Emphasis on virtual and global communication, listening, and collaborative communication skills, and enhancement of communication using multi or social media. Prerequisites: ENGL 110.

BIT 342. Advanced Web Site Design. 3 Hours.

Enhancement of students' skills to plan, develop, and integrate well-designed web sites that combine effective navigation with the balanced use of style sheets, media queries, fluid layouts, images, tables, movie clips, sound, and different methods of creating web-based animations.Offered on campus spring odd years and online spring even. Prerequisites: BIT 235. Corequisite: BIT 236.

BIT 358. IT Infrastructure. 3 Hours.

Designed to explore topics related to both computer and systems architecture and communication networks.

BIT 370. Web-Based Application Development. 3 Hours.

Designed to explore e-Business technologies, web programming languages, databases, and use input. Prerequisite: Student must complete BIT 235 and 312 before enrolling in this class.

BIT 385. Technology Management. 3 Hours.

Designed to explore current issues, approaches to the management of technology, the interaction of new technologies with existing technologies, legal and regulatory implications of technology, ethics, and the processes through which organizations generate and absorb technological innovations.

BIT 391. Methods of Teaching Business. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes the competencies needed for preservice teachers that may apply to the teaching of any business course. Special emphasis placed on classroom management strategies, unit development, lesson planning, evaluation and assessment option, along with other activities pertaining to the actual teaching experience. Offered on campus fall odd years. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and MOS certification at specialist level in Word, Excel or PowerPoint.

BIT 399. Special Topics. 1-3 Hour.

BIT 421. Philosophy of Career & Technical Education. 3 Hours.

Addresses the history, growth, legislation, and elements of career and technical education. Students research principles and practices of vocational business education and their relationship to general business education and other areas of career and technical education. Offered on campus fall odd years. Co-requisite: BIT 432. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and junior status.

BIT 423. Leadership in CTSOs. 3 Hours.

Study of planning and implementing of career and technical student organizations. Principles in developing co-curricular career and technical education curriculum are included. Offered on campus Fall odd years. Prerequisite: Student must be admitted into teacher education before enrolling in this class. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Student must be enrolled in or have completed BIT 421.

BIT 440. Enterprise Architecture. 3 Hours.

Designed to explore the design, selection, implementation, and management of enterprise IT solutions. The focus is on applications and infrastructures as applied within the business. Prerequisite: Student must complete BIT 220 before enrolling in this course.

BIT 441. IS Strategy, Management, & Acquistion. 3 Hours.

Designed to explore the issues and approaches managing change, managing the information systems function in organizations, and how the IS function integrates, supports, and enables various types of organizational capabilities. Prerequisite: Students must complete BIT 440 before enrolling in this course.

BIT 443. Outsourcing Management. 3 Hours.

Designed to explore the initiation of a sourcing decision and evaluation process through supplier selection and transition to outsourcing and insourcing. Prerequisite: Students must complete BIT 220 before enrolling in this course.

BIT 444. IT Security & Information Assurance. 3 Hours.

Designed to explore hardware, software, processes, communications, applications, and policies, and procedures with respect to organizational IT Security and Risk Management. Offered on campus Fall odd years and online Spring even years. Prerequisite: Students must complete BIT 358 before enrolling in this course.

BIT 445. IT Audit Controls. 3 Hours.

Designed to explore the fundamental concepts of the information technology audit and control function. The main focuses of this course is on the understanding information controls, the types of controls and their impact on the organization, and how to manage and audit. Offered on campus Fall odd years and online Spring even years. Prerequisite: Students must complete BIT 385 before enrolling in this course.

BIT 452. Client/Server Database. 3 Hours.

Designed to explore the issues of managing database systems as essential organizational resources. Students learn the enterprise-data-architecture components, data storage configurations, and information retrieval methods. Offered on campus Spring even years and online Fall odd years. Prerequisite: Student must complete BIT 312 before enrolling in this class.

BIT 453. Systems Analysis. 3 Hours.

Designed to explore systematic methodologies for analyzing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role, if any, computer-based technologies can play in addressing the business need, articulating business requirements for the technology solution, specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the technology capabilities need to address the business requirements, and specifying the requirements for the information systems solution. Prerequisite: Student must complete BIT 220, BIT 310, and BIT 311 before enrolling in this class.

BIT 460. MIS Seminar. 3 Hours.

The MIS seminar provides the students an opportunity to explore current issues, trends, and careers in the field. Prerequisite: Restricted to students with senior status.

BIT 470. Projects in MIS. 3 Hours.

The culminating experience fo all MIS majors. The application of concepts learned from courses taken in the College of Business core, Management Information Systems core, and tracks are applied to real world projects. Prerequisite: Restricted to students with senior status.

BIT 494. Independent Study Honors Bued. 1-8 Hour.

BIT 495. Seminars in Leadership Development. 3 Hours.

Special topics in leadership including concepts, principles, and processes to facilitate effective, compassionate, and ethical leadership within the leader/follower relationship. The course will examine the relevance of self-awareness, self-management, environmental situations, social awareness & responsibility, and relationship management in authentic leadership. Prerequisites: Restricted to College of Business majors and minors and students with junior or senior status. Instructor consent is required.

BIT 497. Internship. 3-9 Hour.

Internship allows the student to combine an on-the-job learning experience with related academic coursework. Prerequisite: Senior status, restricted to MIS majors.

BIT 499. Special Topics. 1-3 Hour.

Topics will vary from year to year.

BOTE Courses

BOTE 102. Keyboarding I. 3 Hours.

Basic instruction and practice in using the alphanumeric keyboard. Emphasis on proper fingering for touch operation of the keyboard, development of speed and accuracy, and exploration of business document formatting. Offered online only.

BOTE 127. Information Processing. 3 Hours.

Introduction to compter concepts, hardware and software applications, operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and Internet. Course may be waived if students holds MOUS certification in Word, Excel, and Power Point at the specialist level.

BOTE 147. Word Processing. 3 Hours.

Use of current word processing software to create professional business documents including letters, memos, reports, tables, forms, brochures, and graphic aids. Advanced features in printing, macros, and merging also practiced. Prerequisite: BOTE 152 or at least one semester of high school keyboarding. Offered online only.

BOTE 152. Keyboarding II. 3 Hours.

Development of speed and accuracy in keyboarding straight copy and production activities. Emphasis placed on formatting and keying various business documents including memos, letters, reports, and tables from straight copy, rough drafts, adn unarranged material. Prerequisite: BOTE 102 or at least one semester of high school keyboarding. Offered online only.

BOTE 247. Spreadsheet Applications. 3 Hours.

Intermediate and advanced use of application software for creation of spreadsheets, graphs, databases, and macros. Integration with other software applications is also reviewed.

FIN Courses

FIN 251. Personal Finance. 3 Hours.

Introduces the consumer to money management and the development of long and short term personal financial planning. Topics include budgeting, consumer credit, saving and investing, insurance planning, retirement and estate planning, real estate investment, and shelter planning. An excellent course for beginning students and nonbusiness majors.

FIN 281. Fundamentals of Energy. 3 Hours.

An introductory course in energy fundamentals, which will include an overview of various energy sources, energy terms and definitions, and calculations related to energy. Energy economics and management are emphasized. Energy calculations, such as unit cost for petroleum and unit cost for electricity will be taught. Prerequisite: Students must complete MATH 103 or higher Corequisite: enroll in either GEOL 101 or 105 at the same time as this course.

FIN 299. Special Topics in Finance. 2-3 Hour.

FIN 353. Corporation Finance. 3 Hours.

Introduces the student to the essentials of financial management. Coverage includes financial analysis, working capital management, capital budgeting, cost of capital, dividend policy, and long term financing decisions. Prerequisites: ACCT 201 and MATH 210.

FIN 355. Investments. 3 Hours.

Introduces the student to the principles of investment. Topics to be covered include: description of the investment environment and investment decisions; introduction to investment, securitym and portfolio theories; financial statement analysis; the implications of the Efficient Market Hypothesis for active and passive portfolio management; and analysis, valuation and management of equities, fixed income securities, indices adn indexed funds, and derivative securities. Prerequisites: FIN 353 and ECON 201 and 202.

FIN 357. Advanced Corporate Finance. 3 Hours.

An advanced course which examines issues related to financing the corporation including capital structure, valuation of various forms of dept and equity financing, capital budgeting decisions, dividend policy decisions, financial analysis, forecasting and managing risk with financial instruments. Prerequisite: FIN 353.

FIN 360. Entrepreneurial Finance. 3 Hours.

Introduces the student to the theories, knowledge, and financial tools needed by the entrepreneur in starting, building, and harvesting a successful venture. Topics include financing a new venture, managing profit and cash flow, financing the growth of the firm, alternative financing methods, creation of value, valuation methods, financial distress, and harvesting a successful venture. A primary focus is on the financial aspect of the business plan. Prerequisite: FIN 353.

FIN 421. International Energy Markets. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to International Energy Markets. It will examine energy industry market structure and how it relates to business decision-making. The course will examine both renewable and non-renewable energy industry market structures. The course will provide fundamental economic knowledge needed to implement decisions related to the energy industry. It will review supply and demand structures of the energy market as well as various energy forecasting methodologies. The course will use energy data analysis methodology as a tool for analyzing future energy requirements. Prerequisites: Students must complete FIN 281, ECON 320 and ECON 312.

FIN 443. Real Estate Finance. 3 Hours.

Introduces the students to the basic principles of real estate, real estate law, and real estate finance. Topics include teh ownership and transfer of real estate property, legal instruments, analysis of real estate markets, real estate appraisals, legal aspects of real estate, and financing residential, commercial, and income property. Prerequisites: FIN 353 and ACCT 300.

FIN 451. Insurance & Risk Management. 3 Hours.

Examines the naturs of risk and risk management from a social, individual, business and organizational perspective. Explores the available risk management tools and alternatives including insurance. Prerequisites: FIN 353 and ACCT 300.

FIN 454. Portfolio Theory. 3 Hours.

Studies advanced concepts relating to investment to include financial statement analysis, stock market efficiency and anomalies, derivative securities, valuation of dept, equity securities and modern portfolio theory. Prerequisite: FIN 355.

FIN 455. Financial Institutions & Markets. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the management of depository and non-depository financial institutions and teh use of the money and capital markets in financial management straegy. Institutional emphasis includes banks, S & L's, credit unions, investment companies, real estate investment trusts, finance companies, insurance companies, and pension funds. Prerequisite: FIN 353.

FIN 457. International Corporate Finance. 3 Hours.

Examines financial management implications of exchange risk exposure, accounting conventions, international constraint on capital flows, international investment management, foreign taxation, and working capital management of international firms. Prerequisite: FIN 353.

FIN 458. Financial Analysis and Valuation. 3 Hours.

Provides a framework for using financial statement data in a variety of business analysis and valuation contexts used by management, security analysts, bankers, and business consultants. The student will be taught the concepts and tolls to analyze financial statements and cash flows in order to evaluate the effectiveness of a company's strategy and to make sound financial decisions. Prerequisite: FIN 357 and senior status.

FIN 459. Advanced Project Evaluation. 3 Hours.

This course addresses project evaluation and risk analysis for the energy industry and applies quantitative and statistical techniques to investment decisions. The course will emphasize modeling and forecasting methodologies. Software applications will include standard statistical and risk analysis software packages. Prerequisite: Student must complete FIN 281 and FIN 357 before enrolling in this class.

FIN 491. Seminar in Energy Topics. 2 Hours.

This course introduces current practices and trends and reviews applications that are used in the energy industries. The topics presented will focus on both the short and long-term energy outlook for society. Both renewable and non-renewable energy topics will be presented by industry leaders and experts. Both North Dakota and global energy forecasting needs will be discussed.

FIN 495. Seminars in Leadership Development. 3 Hours.

Special topics in leadership including concepts, principles, and processes to facilitate effective, compassionate, and ethical leadership within the leader/follower relationship. The course will examine the relevance of self-awareness, self-management, environmental situations, social awareness & responsibility, and relationship management in authentic leadership. Prerequisites: Restricted to College of Business majors and minors and students with junior or senior status. Instructor consent is required.

FIN 497. Internships. 2-9 Hour.

A cooperative occupational training program in the area of finance. Maximum of 3 credits will count toward major. Prerequisites: restricted to major, junior or senior status and consent of the department.

FIN 499. Special Topics. 1-16 Hour.

Topics are variable. Offerings include visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.

CD Courses

CD 150. Profession of Com Disorders. 2 Hours.

An introduction into the profession of Communication Disorders. Contents will describe the progression from the preprofessional student level to the expert-consultant level. Major topics will include development of interpersonal skills, professional skills, problem-solving skills, technical skills and knowledge/experience.

CD 299. Special Topics In Comm Disorders. 1-8 Hour.

CD 310. Introduction to Communication Disorders. 3 Hours.

A survey of various communication disorders: language, phonology, fluency, voice, hearing impairment, cleft palate, cerebral palsy, aphasia. Eight hours of clinical observation is required.

CD 320. Introduction to Phonetics. 3 Hours.

A study of the sounds of American English and the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to record normal and disordered articulatory production.

CD 321. Language Development. 3 Hours.

The study of those events and processes which combine in relatively predictable and obdervable ways and are evidenced in the acquisition of language.

CD 322. Speech Sound Disorders. 3 Hours.

The study of the types, causes, and treatment of speech disorders including articulation and phonological disorders, voice and fluency. Eight hours of clinical observation are required. Prerequisite: Student must complete CD 310 and 320 before enrolling in this class.

CD 324. Techniques in Communication Disorders. 3 Hours.

Therapy approaches and techniques for planning and carrying our clinical practicum. This course includes a required laboratory experience and is a prerequisite for CD 411. Prerequisite: CD 322.

CD 331. Language Disorders in Children. 3 Hours.

The study of deviant language patterns and patterns associated with cultural diversity. Language evaluation with emphasis on linguistic analysis and the development of language programming appropriate to language problems will be covered. Five hours of clinical observation are required. Prerequisite: Student must complete CD 321 before enrolling in this class.

CD 341. Speech & Hearing Science. 2 Hours.

Fundamentals of acoustice, speech production, speech perception, and basic instrumentation. Prerequisite: CD 310.

CD 342. Introduction to Audiology. 4 Hours.

A study of the basic tests of hearing with emphasis on test administration and interpretation. It includes anatomy and physiology of the auditory system and its relationship to various types and degrees of hearing loss. Prerequisite: CD 310.

CD 394. Independent Study General Cd. 1-4 Hour.

CD 410. Audiology Practicum. 1 Hour.

This practicum course will provide the undergraduate student in Communication Disorders, who has an interest in Audiology, the opportunity to participate in Audiology diagnostics in the CD clinic. The student will initially observe the audiologic diagnostic/patient management protocols in the clinic and will gradually be required to participate in greater measure. The goal is for the student to acquire greater understanding of audiologic test administration, interpretation, and patient counseling. Pre-requisite: CD 342.

CD 411. Clinical Practicum. 3 Hours.

Supervised practicum in a clinical setting. Prerequisite: CD 324.

CD 412. Neurology for Communication Disorders. 2 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the role of neuroanatomy in speech and language. Attention is given to the structures of the brain and spinal cord, the ascending and descending pathways, cranial nerves, and the vascular supply to the brain. The role of these structures in the communication process is discussed. Prerequisites: CD 310, 341.

CD 413. Anatomy and Phys for Communication Disorders. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the anatomical and physiological bases of communication. Attention is given to the structures and functions of the respiratory, phonatory, resonatory and articulatory systems. Prerequisites: Students must complete CD 310, 341, and 412. May take concurrently with advisor's consent.

CD 420. Advanced Communication Disorders. 3 Hours.

This course will provide a general overview of neurologically-based communication disorders, dysphagia, voice disorders, and stuttering. Course work will emphasize characteristics, procedures for assessment, and general treatment approaches for these communication disorders. Five hours of clinical observation are required.

CD 424. Language Development. 3 Hours.

CD 426. Speech Language Development and Disorders for the Teacher. 4 Hours.

The study of speech language development and disorders of children. Inter-relationships among personal, social, academic, speech, and language skills are covered. Academic modifications and coordination with specialized personnel are emphasized. For non-majors.

CD 427. Aural Rehabilitation. 3 Hours.

Study of the rehabilitative philosophies and methodologies of individuals with hearing impairments.

CD 494. Independent Study Honors Cd. 1-8 Hour.

CD 499. Special Topics In Comm Disorders. 1-8 Hour.

DTS Courses

DTS 200. Special Topics In Dts. 1-8 Hour.

DTS 225. Introduction To Safety Education. 1 Hour.

Promotes general safety with special emphasis on school bus safety, fire safety, adn tornado safety.

DTS 230. Driver & Traffic Safety Education. 3 Hours.

Introduction to driver and traffic safety education. A review of various high school textbooks and other teaching tools.

DTS 250. Defensive Driving. 1 Hour.

Classroom course that is a part of the National Safety Council's Diver improvement program. Successful completion allows a three point reduction on a licensee's driving record.

DTS 260. Teenage Driving Behavior Problems. 2 Hours.

Teaches prospective driver about the past problems concerning teenage traffic offenders. Assists driver educators in adjusting classroom presentations to address problems woth beginning teenage drivers.

DTS 290. Traffic Law. 4 Hours.

3/94 Dropped Q For Pre-Req Purposes.

DTS 325. Org & Admin Safety Ed. 3 Hours.

3/94 Dropped Q For Pre-Req Purposes.

DTS 350. Advanced Driving. 3 Hours.

Advanced driving to improve skills, perception, decision making, and general driving ability.

DTS 390. Traffic Law. 3 Hours.

Study of the Code 39 of North Dalota Motor Vehicle laws. Designed to develop an understanding of traffic law in modern society.

DTS 397. Special Problems-Dts. 1-2 Hour.

3/94 Dropped Q For Pre-Req Purposes.

DTS 399. Independent Study General Dts. 1-4 Hour.

DTS 400. Special Topics In Dts. 1-8 Hour.

DTS 450. Organization & Administration of Safety Education. 2 Hours.

Basic concepts and development of the four phase program: dual controlled car, simulator, multiple car driving range, and classroom. Corequisite or Prerequisite: DTS 230.

DTS 452. instruction in Range, Simulator and In-Car. 3 Hours.

Instruction in the use of electonic driving simulator, equipment, multiple care driving range, and dual controlled car. Prerequisite: DTS 450.

DTS 454. Driver Education for the Disabled. 2 Hours.

Instruction in dual-controlled cars with special hand controls for teaching the handicapped. Prerequisite: DTS 450.

DTS 497. Special Problems-Dts. 1-4 Hour.

3/94 Dropped Q For Pre-Req Purposes.

DTS 498. Special Problems-Dts. 1-4 Hour.

3/94 Dropped Q For Pre-Req Purposes.

DTS 499. Independent Study Honors Dts. 1-8 Hour.

ECE Courses

ECE 215. Infant/Toddler Development. 2 Hours.

This course explores the child's growth and development from birth to 36 months. It will give candidates a basis for understanding normal developmental needs of children and a means of meeting them in the children's home, childcare center, and community environments. Corequisite: Students must enroll in ECE 360 at the same time as this course.

ECE 310. Home School Community Relations. 2 Hours.

This course explore home-school-community relations. The content includes history, parental involvement in school, parent-teacher conferences, home visits, parent and community programs, and community resources for parents. Prerequisites: Students must complete ECE 335 and be enrolled in Teacher Education before enrolling this course. Corequisites: Students must also enroll in ECE 312, 313, and 314 at the same time.

ECE 312. Methods: Arts Integration. 2 Hours.

This course explores and uses the fine and performing arts as primary pathways to learning in young children. Includes selecting materials, creating environments, and planning lessons and activities that integrate art, music, and movement across curriculum disciplines. Prerequisites: Students must complete ECE 335 and be admitted to Teacher Education before enrolling in this course. Corequisites: Students must also be enrolled in ECE 310, 313, and 314 at the same time.

ECE 313. The Emergent Reader. 2 Hours.

This course explores a wide variety of developmentally appropriate instructional practices for teaching early childhood learners multiple ways of communicating and experiencing language through books and media programs. Emphasis is placed on integrating reading, writing, speaking, and listening as forms of creative personal expression. Effective methods of teaching children how to decode and encode print are studied.Prerequisites: Students must complete ECE 335 and be admitted to Teacher Education before enrolling in this course. Corequisites: Students must also be enrolled in ECE 310, 312, and 314 at the same time.

ECE 314. Mathematics & The Young Child. 2 Hours.

This course explores curriculum and methods for teaching mathematics in pre-K through grade 3. Candidates actively engage in projects and activities that help them develop a conceptual understanding of teaching mathematics in a cooperative and constructionist environment where children view themselves as mathematicians. Emphasis is placed on the use of manipulatives, problem solving activities, and children's literature in the planning and organizing of developmentally appropriate classroom activities and lessons. Prerequisites: Students must complete ECE 335 and be admitted to Teacher Education before enrolling in this course. Corequisites: Students must also be enrolled in ECE 310, ECE 312, and ECE 313 at the same time.

ECE 335. Early Childhood Education. 3 Hours.

Study of early childhood learning theories, developmentally appropriate materials. classroom arrangement, observational techniques, and curriculum planning. Actual experience with materials, observation, and field experience.

ECE 360. Language Acquisition:The child. 3 Hours.

Language activity includes speaking, writing, reading, and listening, Coursework will center on how language is acquired, the functions of language and how language develops. Examine how teachers can best support the growth of children as language learners and users. Prerequisites: ECE 335. Co-requisite: ECE 215.

ECE 361. Observation and Assessment ECE. 3 Hours.

Students will learn about and actively engage in a variety of observational methods to assess the social, motor, and cognitive growth of young children. Prerequisite: Student must complete ECE 335 Corequisite: enrolled in ECE 430 at the same time.

ECE 411. Leadership & Supervision. 3 Hours.

This course explore effective organization of early childhood programs and looks at managing the day-to-day operations of a program. Candidates examine leadership frameworks and unique leadership styles, and how to apply the principles of leadership to create vision, become an agent of change, and model professional and ethical behavior. Candidates examine supervision frameworks for effective recruitment, selection, and orientation practices. Candidates study a comprehensive model for supervising staff, promoting ongoing professional development and creating a strengths based team in nurturing positive teaching/learning environments. Prerequisite: Students must complete ECE 335 Corequisite: enrolled in ED 491 at the same time.

ECE 430. Preschool Curriculum & Activities. 2 Hours.

Study of development of 4-7 year olds and procedures in preschool planning including teaching techniques and expressive materials for the campus preschool. Prerequisite: Students must complete ECE 335 and be enrolled in teacher education before enrolling in this course. Corequisite: Students must be enrolled in ECE 361 and 430L at the same time as this course.

ECE 430L. Pre-School Practicum. 1 Hour.

Students will work in the Minot State University Preschool, with direct application of those concepts learned in ECE 361 and ECE 430. Corequisites: Students must take ECE 361 and ECE 430 at the same time. Course is restricted to Early Childhood Education majors and Elementary Education majors with a Kindergarten Concentration. Admittance to teacher education is required.

ELED Courses

ELED 352. Foundations of Reading. 3 Hours.

Principles, techniques, and approaches for implementing a developmental reading program in the elementary school. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320.

ELED 421. Elementary Mathematics Methods. 3 Hours.

Practicum in teaching mathematics to children in cooperative learning groups through the use of manipulative materials, symbolic representations, and problem solving approaches. Observation and participation in a planned teaching experience in a school setting will illustrate and support the learning processes. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, ED 320, MATH 277 and 377 or ECE 314. Corequisites: ELED 422, ELED 423, ELED 424, and SCI 426.

ELED 422. Elementary Language Arts Methods. 3 Hours.

Encompasses curriculum, theory, and methodology in language arts. Observation and participation in a planned teaching experience in a school setting will illustrate and support the learning processes. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320, ELED 352. Corequisite: ELED 421, 423, 424, SCI 426. Course restricted to Elementary Education and Early Childhood Education majors.

ELED 423. Elementary Reading Methods. 3 Hours.

Principles, techniques, approaches, and materials for teaching reading in grades K through 8. Observation and participation in a planned teaching experience in a school setting will illustrate and support the learning processes. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320, ELED 352. Corequisite: ELED 421, 422, 423, 424, SCI 426. Course restricted to Elementaty Education or Early Childhood Education majors.

ELED 424. Elementary Social Studies Methods. 3 Hours.

Curriculum, theory, and methodology in the teaching of social studies. Observation and participation in a planned teaching experience in a school setting will illustrate and support the learning process. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and ED 320. Corequisite: ELED 421, 422, 423, 424 SCI 426. Course restricted to Elementary Education or Early Childhood Education majors.

ELED 425. Elementary Education Practicum. 0 Hours.

This practicum course accompanies the 5 methods classes in elementary education and reflects approximately 150 hours in the elementary classroom.

HMS Courses

HMS 151. Stress Management. 2 Hours.

Focuses on utilizing concepts related to stress and stress management strategies to achieve holistic high level wellness.

HMS 203. Health Care Through the Life Span. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of promotion of health and prevention of illness throughout the life span.

HMS 208. Medical Terminology. 2 Hours.

Comprehensive examination of prefixes, stems, and suffixes as well as emphasis on pronunciation, spelling, and definitions of words used by health professionals including key pathology, diagnostic and treatment procedures terms.

HMS 213. Life Span Growth & Development. 3 Hours.

Focuses on human growth and development throughout the life span. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Classroom Study = 45 hrs.

HMS 215. Principles of Pharmacology. 3 Hours.

Provides a survey of all major drug groups as they apply to providing safe, therapeutic client care.

HMS 240. Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Nutrition and application to human dietary needs of people at different ages.

HMS 243. Pathophysiology. 3 Hours.

Provide fundamental knowledge of the structural and functional changes caused by disease and alterations in body function. Emphasis is placed on understanding changes and responses that produce signs and symptoms in common health problems. Prerequisites: Student must complete BIOL 220 and 221 before enrolling in this class.

HMS 260. Introduction to Public Health. 3 Hours.

Examines the history, biomedical basis, disciplines (epidemiology, statistics, social and behavioral sciences), and techniques of public health, including education and policy development. Focuses on the health care system, medical care, and trends in public health. Prerequisite: Restricted to students with senior standing or have consent of instructor.

HMS 279. Death & Dying. 3 Hours.

Provides a wholistic approach to end-of-life issues, including death, dying, and bereavement.

HMS 299. Special Topics Health Mgmt Sci. 1-8 Hour.

HMS 322. Therapeutic Touch. 2 Hours.

This elective course explores the scientific, theoretical, and clinical foundations of therapeutic touch. Contemporary research findings are discussed and critiqued. Blends both didactic and experiential learning into a balanced, grounded approach to this new version of ancient, caring, healing art. Prerequisites: junior or senior year or faculty approval. CS = 30*.

HMS 333. Transcultural Health Care. 3 Hours.

Present framework for health care providers to learn concepts and characteristics of diverse populations to provide culturally competent care for individuals, families, and communities.

HMS 379. Health & Physiological Aspects of Aging. 3 Hours.

Examines concepts of health, physiological changes, and health related practices of older adults. Required for Gerontology minor.

HMS 394. Independent Study General HMS. 1-4 Hour.

HMS 460. Quality & Risk Management in Health Care. 3 Hours.

Examines the fundamentals of a health care quality and risk management program, including risk identification, loss prevention, loss reduction, claims management process, risk financing, legal-ethical factors, and clinical risk exposures. Provides experience in quality and risk management practices that are unique to the health care settings. Prerequisite: Restricted to students with senior standing or have consent of instructor.

HMS 463. Issues Health Care Regs & Prac. 3 Hours.

Examines a variety of agencies that oversee and regulate healthcare in the United States. Focuses on a variety of professional standards and laws that affect quality of care, delivery, and managerial decision making. Prerequisite: Restricted to students with Senior status.

HMS 494. Independent Study Honors HMS. 1-8 Hour.

HMS 499. Special Topics Health Mgmt Sci. 1-8 Hour.

HPER Courses

HPER 100. Concepts of Fitness & Wellness. 2 Hours.

Provides information ans skill training directed to assessing the health related components of physical fitness, proper nutritional needs for performing physical activities, laboratory activities (aerobic dance, calisthenics, walk/jog, and weight training), and the cognitive concepts of health related fitness.

HPER 101. Dance. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation and fundamental movement, including but not limited to social, folk, and square dance.

HPER 102. Jogging & Conditioning. 1 Hour.

Instruction, pratice, and participation in the basis skilss, body mechanics, and terminology associated with jogging and power walking. An emphasis is placed on developing a personal fitness program to fit the individual's needs and current abilities.

HPER 103. Beginning Gymnastics. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in fundamental tumbling skills, movement fundamentals, and warm-up.

HPER 104. Team Sports. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in (but not limited to) speedball, flickerball, basketball, and softball.

HPER 105. Outdoor Activities I. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in (but not limited to) snow skiing and other outdoor related activities. Fees apply to specific activities.

HPER 106. Varsity Soccer. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity soccer. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 107. Introduction to Physical Education. 2 Hours.

Provides prospective physical educators with ans insight into the broad scope of physical education. The student will have the opportunity to obtain an understanding and appreciation of this multifaceted field. Opportunities to assess what physical education offers in terms of career potential. Pre- or corequisite: HPER 100.

HPER 108. Volleyball. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in the fundamental skills and sport of volleyball.

HPER 109. Racket Sports. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in (but not limited to) tennis, racquetball, and pickleball.

HPER 110. Beginning Swimming. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in the fundamental skills of swimming. An emphasis will be placed on water survival skill based upon the American Red Cross water safety guidelines.

HPER 111. Varsity Football. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity football.

HPER 112. Varsity Basketball. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity basketball.

HPER 113. Varsity Track and Field. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity track and field.

HPER 114. Varsity Tennis. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity tennis.

HPER 115. Varsity Golf. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity golf.

HPER 116. Varsity Cross Country. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity cross country.

HPER 117. Varsity Volleyball. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity volleyball.

HPER 118. Varsity Cheerleading. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in cheerleading during the fall or winter sports.

HPER 119. Varsity Softball. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity softball.

HPER 120. Weight Training. 1 Hour.

Instruction, practice, and participation in the basis skills, body mechanics, and terminology associated with weight training. An emphasis is placed on developing a weight training program to fit the individual's needs and current abilities.

HPER 121. Varsity Baseball. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity baseball.

HPER 122. Varsity Dance Team. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation on the varsity dance team.

HPER 123. Outdoor Activities II. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in (but not limited to) canoeing and other associated outdoor activities. Fees apply to specific activites.

HPER 124. Individual Sports. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation, terminology, knowledge, and skills associated with (but not limited to) golf and archery.

HPER 125. Intermediate Swimming. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in the perfection of swimming skills.

HPER 126. Group Fitness. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in fundamental movement skills and routines associated both group fitness or water aerobics.

HPER 127. Advanced Hunter Education. 1 Hour.

Provides North Dakota Hunter Education certification, firearms historym and nomenclature, marksmanship theory and practice, firearm handling and safety (which includes live firing with shotgun), basic first aid survival, hunting, philosophy, and hunter ethics.

HPER 128. Introduction to Athletic Training. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to familiarize student with the profession of athletic training. Students will be introduced to the NATA, the NATA Code of Ethics, the certification process, continuing education, and the NATA Educational Proficiencies. Course topics include epidemiology of injuries, PPE, and program overview.

HPER 129. A T Clinical Experience I. 1 Hour.

Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiencies for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The emphasis this clinical course includes the content areas of acute care of injury and illness, clinical evaluation of basic injuries, prevention, and health promotion, which includes risk management/prevention, basic healthcare administration, basic psychosocial skills/knowledge, professional development and respoinsibility and to a limited extent, nutrition. Evidence based practice is embedded throughout the entire curriculum. Students in HPER 129 clinical experience will have prior experience in HPER 208. Prerequisite: Students must complete HPER 128, have CPR certification, and be admitted to the Athletic Training program before enrolling in this course.

HPER 131. Varsity Wrestling. 1 Hour.

Requires active participation in varsity wrestling. Repeatable for credit.

HPER 206. Medical Conditions. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to recognize and treat common medical conditions.

HPER 207. Prevention & Care of Injuries. 2 Hours.

Provides a basic understanding of common injuries. Focus will be on the evaluation and course of treatment of the injuries presented.

HPER 208. Taping and Bracing. 2 Hours.

Application in the techniques of taping and bracing athletic injuries.

HPER 210. First Aid & CPR. 2 Hours.

Provides instruction in first aid, emergency care procedures, and CPR, which leads to certification by the American Red Cross.

HPER 215. Methods of Teaching Sport Activities. 2 Hours.

Provides instruction, practice, and teaching experience in sports activities. Fundamental rules, skills, terminology, and teaching strategies will be emphasized in (but not limited to) the following sports; softball, soccer, speedball, volleyball, badminton, recquetball, archery, golf, tennis, wallyball, pickleball, and ultimate frisbee. This course in resticted to PE majors and minors, and corporate fitness majors.

HPER 220. Methods of Teaching Dance. 2 Hours.

Provides pratice, instruction, and teaching experience in (but not limited to) social, folk, and square dance. Emphasis will be placed on methods and techniques of teaching the rhythms of dance steps and placement of dance. This course is restricted to PE majors and minors, and corporate fitness majors.

HPER 223. A T Clinical Experience II. 1 Hour.

Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. Students in the HPER 223 Clinical Experience will have prior experience in HPER 431, HPER 206, and HPER 410, in addition to the courses listed in the HPER 129 Clinical Experience. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiencies for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The emphasis of this clinical course includes content areas of clinical evaluation of medical conditions and injuries, prevention and health promotion, which includes risk management/preventioin, basic healthcare administration, therapeutic intervention, including pharmacology and modalities. Evidence based practice is embedded throught the entire curriculum. Prerequisites: Students must take HPER 129, 206, 410, 431, and sophomore status enrolling in this class.

HPER 225. Fitness Leadership. 2 Hours.

Course provides prospective corporate fitness, physical education and coaching professionals with an understanding of the fitness industry.

HPER 226. Methds of Teaching Group Fitness and Weight Training. 2 Hours.

Provides instruction, practice, and teaching experience in aerobic exercise and weight training. Fundamental terminology, skills, and teaching techniques of the two activities will be emphasized. Students will practice developing training routines tailored to fit ability, fitness level, and desired outcomes of their future students and clients. Prerequisites: HPER 120 and 126.

HPER 231. Methods of Teaching Aquatics. 2 Hours.

Instruction and participation in the basic swimming stokes, water games, and aquatic exercises.

HPER 270. Upper/Low Extremity Evaluattion. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to perform evaluation of upper and lower extremity (UE/LE) injuries or conditions. Student's will be able to perform an observation, history, palpate, perform MMT, perform a neurological evaluation, evaluate ROM, perform special and functional tests for the UE/LE. Prerequisite(s): HPER 207, and 431, and BIOL 220.

HPER 299. Special Topics in Human Performance. 1-3 Hour.

HPER 301. Psychomotor Development. 2 Hours.

Provides an understanding of the changes that occur in motor behavior over the entire life span. Participants will have opportunities to discuss issues relating to various motor development theories and to the different influences affecting an individual's motor development. Participants will have opportunities to observe and analyze fundamental motor patterns as they are performed in various settings. Emphasis is placed on the identification of components of correct form, the detection of incorrect form, and the appropriate use on skill cues to prompt participants toward correct form.

HPER 304. Therapeutic Exercise. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide a background rehabilitation, healing, physics, examination, and assessment. The course will discuss techniques of therapeutic exercise, performance enhancement, and application to regions and conditions of the body. Prerequisite(s): HPER 410, and 431.

HPER 307. Head, Neck, & Spine Evaluation. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to perform evaluation of head, neck and spine injuries or conditions. Student's will be able to perform an observation, take a history, palpate, perform MMT, perform a neurological evaluation, evaluate ROM, perform special and functional tests for the head, neck, and spine. Prerequisite(s): HPER 207, and 431, and BIOL 220.

HPER 308. Biomechanics. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to biomechanics. Course topics include terminology, the quantitative and qualitative perspective of biomechanics. The study of biomechanics in this class will involve the study of the body's architecture with the body's abilities to function in motion. Prerequisite(s): HPER 207, and 431, and BIOL 220.

HPER 310. Organization & Administration of PE & Athletics. 2 Hours.

Provides a study of administration and management concepts and management responsibilities relevant to teaching and non-teaching career fields. Prerequisite: HPER 107.

HPER 323. A T Clinical Experience III. 2 Hours.

Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. Students in the HPER 323 Clinical Experience will have taken HPER 270 in addition to the required courses for HPER 129 and HPER 223. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiencies for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The emphasis of this clinical course includes the content areas of clinical evaluation of medical conditions, injuries with experience in evaluation of upper and lower extremity injuries, prevention and health promotion, which includes risk management/prevention/nutrition, basic healthcare administration, and psychosocial intervention. Evidence based practice is embedded throughout the entire curriculum. Prerequisites: Student must complete HPER 270, 223, and junior status before enrolling in this class.

HPER 324. A T Clinical Experience IV. 2 Hours.

Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. Students in the HPER 324 clinical will have taken HPER 307 in addition to the required courses for HPER 129, 223, and HPER 323. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiencies for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The emphasis of this clinical course includes the content areas of clinical evaluation of medical conditions, injuries with experience in evaluation of injuries to upper extremity, lower extremity, head, neck, and spine in addition to the evaluation skills students remain to be active in their implementation of therapeutic modalities through the practice of treating the entire patient and with clinical integration of skills and knowledge. Evidence based practice is a focus in this clinical with evidence based practice performing a literature search on topics of prevention and health promotion, which includes risk management/prevention/nutrition and psychosocial intervention. Prerequisites: Student must take HPER 307 and 323 and junior status before enrolling in this class.

HPER 325. Personal Training Methods. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to provide prospective physical educators, coaches, and corporate fitness majors with instruction, practice, and teaching experience in personal training and lifestyle management coaching. Fundamental terminology, personal training skills, strategies and techniques will be emphasized. Students will practice developing personal training programs tailored to fit the ability, fitness level, and desired outcomes of prospective clients. Prerequisite: Students must complete HPER 226 before enrolling in this course.

HPER 334. Nutrition for Physical Performance. 2 Hours.

Provides information on how nutritional habits affect physical performance. An emphasis will be placed on knowledge of the six basic nutrients, food groups, claories, and energy expenditure.

HPER 340. Elementary Methods & Activities. 3 Hours.

Provides prospective teachers with an understanding of a contemporary and reflective approach to teaching elementary physical education grades K-6. This approach to teaching is based on "Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children" by Robert P. Pangrazi Ph. D and serves as the content for the recently published National Standards for Physical Education (Moving into the Future, 1995). Participants will learn and practice a set of specific teaching behaviors and curriculum development skills, which will be most useful as beginning teachers. Peer teaching and participation in up to six fields experiences in surrounding elementary schools are also a part of class. Activities in this class will result in materials meeting many of the INTASC standards. Prerequisites: HPER 301 and Admission to Teacher Education. In addition, this course is a prerequisite for HPER 341 and it is highly recommended that this is also be taken prior to HPER 391.

HPER 341. Practicum for Elementary Physical Education. 2 Hours.

Provides prospective physical education teachers with active participation in the complete process of teaching developmentally appropriate physical education to children in grades K-6. This approach to teaching is based on "Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Chilren: by Robert P. Pangrazi Ph. D and serves as the content for national standards for physical education (Moving into the Future, 1995). Participants will recieve twenty-four contact hours wiht children during which time they will practice and refine instructional skills taught in HPER 340. Prerequisites: HPER 340 and Admission to Teacher Education.

HPER 360. Administration of School Health Programs. 3 Hours.

The development and administration of the public school health program, with emphasis being placed on health services, helthful school living, and health instruction. Special emphasis placed on developing and administrating health instruction material for the elementary theough senior high school program based upon the guidelines and recommendations of the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction.

HPER 361. Vital Health Issues. 3 Hours.

Provides participants with an understanding of various current health topics and issues including (but not limited to) stree, mental health, intimate relationships, weight management, and substance abuse.

HPER 362. Principles & Methods of Teaching School Health. 3 Hours.

Provides prospective teachers with an understanding of a contemporary and reflective approach to teaching health in the public schools grades K-12. This approach to teaching is based on learner-centered instructional strategies. Participants will learn and practice skills that will be most useful to them as beginning teachers such as: (a) establishing the learning environment; (b) planning appropriate and meaningful learning experiences; and (c) using effective teaching behaviors to implement the lesson plans.

HPER 391. Secondary Physical Education Methods and Practicum. 4 Hours.

This course has two major components. First, methods coursework done at MSU which provides teaching strategies for classroom management, planning, instruction, and assessment of teacher as well as student behavior. Application of current theories of motivation are explored and applied in this course. Second, forty-five contact hours woth secondary students will provide extensive opportunity to apply current jpractices learned in the classroom. Prerequisites: HPER 301, Admission to Teacher Education, and it is highly recommended that students take HPER 340 prior to enrolling in this course. Course restricted to Physical Education majors.

HPER 394. Independent Study. 2 Hours.

HPER 401. Methods of Coaching Football. 2 Hours.

Provides techniques, skills, strategies, and coaching procedures developed through classroom presentations and skill sessions.

HPER 402. Methods of Coaching Basketball. 2 Hours.

Provides fundamental and team concepts developed through classroom and skill sessions.

HPER 403. Methods of Coaching Track. 2 Hours.

Provides responsibilities, rules, methods, and techniques of coaching track and field. Laboratory work ans skill sessions.

HPER 404. Methods of Coaching Baseball. 2 Hours.

Provides fundamental and team concepts developed through classroom presentations and skill sessions.

HPER 405. Methods of Coaching Wrestling. 2 Hours.

Provides the requirements, responsibilities, and methods of coaching wrestling on a secondary or junior high school level. Along with classroom lecture and discussion the students will be required to observe practice sessions and matches at the local junior and senior high schools.

HPER 406. Methods of Coaching Volleyball. 2 Hours.

Provides techniques, skills, strategies, and coaching procedures developed through in-class analysis and on court skill sessions.

HPER 407. Psychology of Physical Education & Athletes. 2 Hours.

Provides knowledge of the psychological aspects of participation in physical education and athletic events. Emphasis will be placed on the teacher/coach and student/athlete relationship in regard to developing communication. leadership, motiation, self-confidence, and goal setting skills. Prerequisite: PYS 111.

HPER 410. Advanced Athletic Injuries & Modalities. 3 Hours.

Provides specific manual examinations involved in the evaluation of athletic injuries. Use of therapeutic modalities in the treatment of athletic injuries will also be studied. Students will take part in laboratory work in order to facilitate hands on experience. Prerequisite or Corequisite: HPER 207.

HPER 420. Athletic Training Management. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students witht the scope and practice of managing an athletic training enviornment. Topics include organization and administration of an athletic training room, the reimbursement, policies and procedures of athletic training rooms, and the legal concerns. Prerequisite(s): HPER 207.

HPER 423. A T Clinical Experience V. 2 Hours.

Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. Students in the HPER 423 clinical will have taken HPER 308 and HPER 304 in addition to the required courses for HPER 129, HPER 223, HPER 323, and HPER 324. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiencies for this clinical course are based on content areas of clinical evaluation of injuries with experience in the clinical evaluation and acute care of medical conditions and injuries to upper extremity, lower extremity, head, neck, and spine, in addition to the evaluation skills students retain to be active in their implementation of therapeutic modalities as well as therapeutic exercise skill through the practice of treating the entire patient with clinical integration of skills and knowledge learned throughout the program. Prevention and health promotion continues to be a theme in HPER 423, which includes risk management and prevention of injuries and nutrition. In addition to the courses listed, students will also have the courses listed in the HPER 129, 223, 323, and 324 clinical courses. Prerequisites: Student must complete HPER 304, 308, and 324, as well as senior status before taking this class.

HPER 424. A T Clinical Experience VI. 2 Hours.

Students will be assigned to clinical rotations during this clinical course. Students in the HPER 424 clinical will have taken HPER 420 in addition to the required courses for HPER 129, HPER 223, HPER 323, HPER 423, and HPER 423. The competencies and clinical integrated proficiencies for this clinical course are based on content knowledge and psychomotor skills taught in previous courses. The theme for this clinical course is embedded in the acute care of injuries and illness and the use of clinical integration proficiencies form student content throughout their program that ensures students have the skill set and knowledge to become successful entry-level athletic trainers. In addition to the courses listed, students will also have the courses listed in the HPER 129, 223, 323, 324, and 424 clinical courses. Prerequisites: Student must take HPER 420 and 423 and have senior status before enrolling in this class.

HPER 425. Capstone in Athletic Training. 1 Hour.

The capstone course is a course designated to allow students to show case their knowledge and research skills that they have learned while in the program. The theme for this courses is professional development and responsibilities. The courses format is a two part format with one portion of the course is devoted to allowing students to be active in creating evidence based medicine through a research project or presentation of a comprehensive literature review and the other portion devoted to preparing the athletic training student for the certification exam. The semester will start out with an introduction of the expectations for athletic training students for the certification exam. The semester will start out with an introduction of the expectations for research presentations. Students will select a research topic that provides an opportunity for scholarly work. The topics will be selected by the students a the onset of the semester to allow ample opportunities for an open forum format or presented at the North Dakota Athletic Trainer's Association's annual meeting. The next portion of the course will provide students with study techniques and practice exams to prepare them for the BOC, Inc. certification exam. Instructors, prior students, and outside guests will be invited to speak to the students on athletic training topics. Prerequisites: Students must complete HPER 423 and have senior status before enrolling in this course.

HPER 431. Kinesiology. 3 Hours.

Provides study of joint movements and muscle action as related to physical activities. Prerequisite: BIOL 115 or 220.

HPER 433. Physiology of Exercise. 3 Hours.

Provides a comprehensive study of the physiological effect of muscular exercise and training upon organs and systems of the body. Prerequisite: HPER 431.

HPER 441. Evaluation of Psychomotor Performance. 3 Hours.

Designed to provide the corporate fitness and physical education major with an understanding of contemporary methods used to measure and evaluate psychomotor skills and performance. Emphasis will be placed on learning and practicing techniques necessary for proper evaluation of health and performance related to physical fitness and selected sport skills.

HPER 442. Methods of Teaching Physical Education to the Disabled. 2 Hours.

Provides practical methods and teaching applications that can be used in a mainstreamed or adapted group games, dance, and individual and dual sports. Prerequisite: HPER 215.

HPER 494. Special Topics In Physical Ed. 1-8 Hour.

HPER 496. Coaching Activities Practicum. 2 Hours.

Coaching minors work with experienced coaches in the field to gain practical experience in a field setting. All practicum's arranged by the department.

HPER 497. Practicum in Corporate Fitness. 2-8 Hour.

256 hours of practicum experience at three sites in a recreation, wellness, or performance setting. Students must take at least two credits at a time, with 32 hours of clinical experience required per credit. Restricted to junior and senior corporate fitness majors. All HPER courses for the major must be completed.

NURS Courses

NURS 221. Pre-Professional Development. 1 Hour.

Facilitates the development of professional behaviors, roles, and responsibilities. Provides opportunity for professional development, community service, and continuing education. Nursing elective graded pass/fail. Guidelines available through Department of Nursing. Prerequisite: Pre-nursing or nursing major.

NURS 222. Math For Meds. 1 Hour.

Enables the student to develop calculation skills, using the dimensional analysis technique, to safely calculate and administer medications.

NURS 253. Nursing Perspectives. 3 Hours.

Focuses on introductory concepts of the discipline of professional nursing. Open to the general university student. CS = 45*.

NURS 255. Nursing Foundations. 5 Hours.

Applies basic theoretical concepts to professional nursing in appropriate practice settings. Prerequisites: Admission to nursing. CS = 60; C/L = 90*.

NURS 264. Health Assessment. 4 Hours.

Applies methods required for a nursing health assessment in classroom and laboratory setting. Prerequisites: Admission to nursing. CS = 45; C/L = 45*.

NURS 299. Special Topics. 1-4 Hour.

NURS 323. Gerontological Nursing. 3 Hours.

Fosters an awareness and understanding of the aging population by investigating the biopsypchosocial and spiritual needs of the elderly population. The issues of wellness, health, and function are addressed. The student is expected to gain an understanding of nursing and nursing's role in providing care for the older population. Prerequisites: NURS 255, 263, 264 or permission of instructor; and admission to nursing.

NURS 325. Adult Health I. 5 Hours.

Focuses on nursing care of adults experiencing common health problems with predictable outcomes in selected body systems, including concepts of absorption, elimination. regulation, mobility, perceptual dysfunction, cell injury and inflammation, altered immune responses, and perioperative principles. Concepts important in understanding health and illness in the elderly are included. Clinical experiences occur in laboratory simulation and perioperative settings. Prerequisites: Admission to nursing. CS = 45; C/L = 90*.

NURS 335. Adult Health II. 5 Hours.

Focuses on nursing care for adults, including the elderly, who experience chronic and/or progressive health problems in selected body systems. Concepts of sensation, oxygenation, digestion, regulation, movement/coordination, and abnormal cell growth are included. Principles and practices of intravenous therapy are applied to the adult client. Clinical experiences occur in the laboratory, medical, and rehabilitation settings of the hospital. Prerequisite: Admission to nursing. CS = 45; C/L = 90*.

NURS 344. Child Health Nursing. 4 Hours.

Applies theories, concepts and competencies in providing nursing care for infants, children, and adolescents within families. Clinical experiences will occur in a variety of settings. Prerequisites: Admission to nursing. CS = 30; C/L = 45*.

NURS 354. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing. 4 Hours.

Applies psychosocial concepts and theories in psychiatric-mental health nursing within a nursing process framework for care of persons with mental health conditions. CS = 30; C/L = 90. Prerequisites: Student must complete NURS 325, 335, PSY 270 and be admitted into the nursing program before enrolling in this class.

NURS 361. Women's Health. 1 Hour.

Apply current theories and concepts in women's health and health practices within families. Prerequisite: Restricted to students who are admitted into the nursing program.

NURS 363. Nursing Theory and Research. 3 Hours.

Surveys contribution of theory and research to the development of the discipline of nursing. Focuses on nursing theories, conceptualizations, and research utilization for decision making within professional nursing. Prerequsite: Admission to nursing. CS = 45*.

NURS 364. Maternal Newborn Nursing. 4 Hours.

Applies current theories, concepts and competencies in evidence based maternal-newborn nursing. Provides experiences in caring for women, childbearing, families and newborns in the hospital, clinic and community. Compares the nursing roles in maternal-newborn nursing. CS - 30; C/L = 90. Prerequisite: Student must have completed NURS 335 prior to enrolling in this class.

NURS 383. Professional Nursing I. 3 Hours.

Professional Nursing I introduces the student to the nature of baccalaureate nursing, including the Department of Nursing Philosophy and curricular concepts. Students explore various nursing roles and theories in a variety of traditional and nontraditional settings. Prerequisite: acceptance into BSN program.

NURS 394. Nursing Internship. 1-6 Hour.

NURS 397. Nursing Internship. 2-6 Hour.

Fostering development of clinical nursing skills and decision making in approved health care agencies. Guidelines available through Department of Nursing. Prerequisite: admission to nursing. One semester credit hour = minimun of 45 hours of clinical study. Prerequisite: NURS 335.

NURS 399. Independent Study General Nurs. 1-4 Hour.

NURS 421. Nursing Leadership Development. 1 Hour.

Provides opportunities to implement leadership skills in professional roles and commiunity service. Promotes activities in professionalism, continuing education, and networking. Guidelines available through Department of Nursing. Prerequisites: NURS 256 and 264; and admission to nursing.

NURS 456. Public Health Nursing. 5 Hours.

Demonstrates population-focused community-oriented nursing through the synthesis of nurisng theory and public health theory applied to promoting, preserving and maintaining the health of populations and grounded in social justice. Provides experience in a variety of urban, rural, and frontier community settings. Prerequisite: NURS 344,354,361 and 364. Admission to nursing. CS = 45; C/L = 90*.

NURS 457. Public Health for the Professional Nurse. 5 Hours.

Demonstrates population-focused community-oriented nursing through the synthesis of nursing theory and public health theory applied to promoting, preserving and maintaining the health of populations and grounded in social justice. Provides experience in a variety of urban, rural, and frontier community settings. Prerequisite: NURS 363 and 383. Admission to BSN Completion Program. CS = 45; C/L = 90*.

NURS 458. Public Health Prof Nurse II. 3 Hours.

Provides opportunities for clinical application of population-focused, community-oriented nursing theory through experience in a variety of urban, rural and/or frontier community settings. Prerequisites: NURS 383,363,457 or corequisite and Admission to RN to BSN.

NURS 464. Adult Health III. 5 Hours.

Focuses on advanced nursing care of adults experiencing acute, complex, and potentially unstable illnesses and injuries. Concepts, principles, and theories relating to adaptation and life support management of regulatory systems are included. Clinical experiences include laboratory simulation and life system support settings, including critical care areas, dialysis, and emergency/trauma services. Prerequisite: Admission to nursing and senior status. CS = 45; C/L = 90*.

NURS 471. Nursing Review. 1 Hour.

Provides a systematic review of essential nursing content required for licensure. Prerequisites: Student must complete NURS 456 and 484 before enrolling in this class.

NURS 472. Trends and Issues. 2 Hours.

Evaluates current issues and trends impacting upon professional nursing practice. Introduces strategies to empower nurses for professional nursing with emphasis on legal, ethical and politicacl economic frameworks, career management; health care policy. Prerequisites: Admission to nursing and faculty approval. CS = 30*.

NURS 473. Nursing Leadership & Management. 3 Hours.

Analyzes theories and concepts of leadership and management for the professional nurse in dynamic nursing care delivery systems. Prerequisite: Admission to nursing. CS = 45*.

NURS 483. Professional Nursing II. 3 Hours.

Professional Nursing II will provide the student with an opportunity to examine professional nursing in a changing health care delivery system including the current and future focus of nursing care. Prerequisite: Acceptance into RN to BSN completion program.

NURS 493. Professional Nursing III. 3 Hours.

This integrative capstone course provides the student opportunity to design and implement a project in collaboration with faculty by integrating leadership and management concepts into nursing practice in a health care system. Prerequisite: acceptance into RN to BSN completion program.

NURS 494. Independent Study Honors Nurs. 1-8 Hour.

NURS 496. Study Abroad. 1-6 Hour.

Provides opportunities for MSU faculty-led study trips to appropriate locations. Focuses on becoming more culturally knowledgeable about global health care by immersion in a nursing culture of a different country. Will include additional requirements beyond travel itself. May be repeated for credit for different countries.

NURS 497. Nursing Practicum. 6 Hours.

Integrates management concepts in clinical nursing practice in selected health care systems with the collaborative guidance of faculty and clinical preceptors. Prerequisites: Admission to nursing. C/L = 270*.

NURS 499. Special Topics In Nursing. 1-8 Hour.

PSY Courses

PSY 111. Introduction to Psychology. 3 Hours.

A survey of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics studied include development of normal and abnormal behavior, learning, biopsychology, development, memory, personality, cognition, therapy, and social psychology. This course is a prerequisite to most other psychology courses.

PSY 112. Foundations of Psychology. 3 Hours.

Designed for psychology and addiction studies majors, this course will emphasize the tools necessary to advance in these fields. Prerequisites: Students must complete PSY 111 before enrolling in this class, and declare a major in Psychology or Addiction Studies.

PSY 200D. Special Topics. 4 Hours.

PSY 241. Introduction to Statistics. 4 Hours.

This course examines basic concepts in measurement, scaling, descriptive statistics, binomial and normal distribution, applied probability, and z-scores. In addition, this course introduces inferential statistics and hypothesis testing, including t-test, analysis of variance, correlation and linear regression, and the chi-square test statistic. Basic software applications will also be examined. Prerequisites: PSY 111 and ASC 93 or higher.

PSY 242. Research Methods in Psychology. 4 Hours.

A study of the scientific methods as it is used in the investigation of problems in psychology. A variety of types of research methodologies, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of their use. Ethical implications of the use of various methofologies will also be discussed. Prerequisites: PSY 241 or departmental approval.

PSY 252. Child Psychology. 3 Hours.

Overview of theories of human development form conception through childhood including physical, cognitive, language, social, and self-help skills in family, school, and community settings. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 255. Child & Adolescent Psychology. 3 Hours.

Overview of theories of human development from conception through adolescence including the physical, cognitive, language, social, and educational aspects of the individual development. Special emphasis will be given to the individuals learning capabilities. This course cannot be applies towards the Psychology or Addiction Studies majors, minors, or concentrations. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 261. Psychology of Adjustment. 3 Hours.

This course will present psychological research about improving adjustment and overall quality of life. Factors affecting adjustment include gender, personality, self-esteem, ability to communicate effectively, health, experience of stress, changes with aging, and coping processes. Factors also include things like social influence and pressure, relationships with others, career preparation, work, and stages of life. The desired outcome is for students to use this knowledge to actively take charge of their own lives, effectively adjusting to an ever-changing world. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 270. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Hours.

A survey of the classification, symptoms, and etiology of psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 297. Addiction Studies Practicum. 2 Hours.

Participation in individual, group, and family counseling in an agency or hospital involved in addiction counseling. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 299. Special Topics In Psychology. 1-8 Hour.

PSY 313. Industrial Organizational Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course will examine human behavior in industrial and organizational settings. Psychological principles are applied to selection, placement, adn training. The effectiveness of individuals and groups within organizations, including leadership and control, conflict and cooperation, motivation, and organizational structure and design, is examined. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 338. Professional Relations & Ethics. 3 Hours.

Study of Federal Confidentiality Laws and ND Commitment Law and process in order to protect the rights of the client. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 344. Dynamics of Addiction. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes the history of drug abuse, theories, and controversies regarding chemical dependency, and multidisciplinary approaches to treatment. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 349. Psychopharmacology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to behavioral pharmacology, including the basics of pharmacology, psychology, and neuroscience needed to understand drugs of abuse. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 352. Adolescent Psychology. 3 Hours.

Study of physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and behavioral parameters of adolescence from preteen to young adulthood. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 365. Evolutionary Psychology. 3 Hours.

Examines the important aspects of human behavior as it is explained as a result of natural selection. The course will focus on a number of topics including sex differences, mate selection, selfishness and altruism, homicide and violence. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 375. History & Systems of Psychology. 3 Hours.

Examines the historical development of the science of psychology. Special emphasis is placed upon cultural context and its influences on the developing systems of psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 376. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary approach to the study of behavior of individuals in relation to social stimulus situation. Prerequisites: PSY 111 and SOC 110.

PSY 379. Psychology of Adult & Aging. 3 Hours.

Overview of theories of human development from young adulthood through old age focusing on demands of personal adjustment, family, work, retirement, adn community life. Prerequisites: PSY 111; recommended: PSY 252 or 352.

PSY 394. Independent Study General Psych. 1-4 Hour.

Election of a topic and a course of study. Must be approved by a psychology staff member and the psychology chair. Student must be a psychology major and have 12 semester credits.

PSY 410. Cognitive Psychology. 3 Hours.

Examines the research dealing with the processing of sensory information, attention, short term and long term memory, decision making and problem solving, as well as related topics. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 411. Introduction to Personality Theories. 3 Hours.

Examines the basic concepts of personality development as viewed by the psychoanalytic, learning, humanistic and trait-type theorists. Special emphasis is placed on the comparison of various perspectives. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 413. Theories & Practice of Psychotherapy. 3 Hours.

Aimed at the development of a balanced view of teh major concepts of various therapies and an awareness of pratical applications and implementation of techniques used by the various therapists. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 420Q. Family Dynamics. 4 Hours.

Psy Exceptional Chldrn Dropped Spring 1990; New Course (Family Dynamics) Approved By Senate Spring 1990.

PSY 423. Introduction to Counseling. 3 Hours.

Study of the theories of counseling and application of these principles for dealing with behavioral problems in agencies, schools, or hospitals. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 424. Advanced Counseling. 3 Hours.

Further study of counseling theory with students being required to develop a workable methodology of their own. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 435. Theories of Learning. 3 Hours.

Examines the basic concepts of learning theory as viewed by the more prominent theorists in the area. Emphasis is placed on the comparison of the various perspectives within historical contexts. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 460. Sensation and Perception. 3 Hours.

Focus on the principles of our sensory systems and the laws which govern the sensory processes. The course includes research and theories on the visual system, auditory system, chemical senses, and the skin senses. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 465. Physiological Psychology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological bases of behavior, including learning, reinforcement, eating and drinking, sleep, sexual behavior, and mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 473. Behavior Modification. 3 Hours.

Description of behavioral principles and procedures for assessment and treatment that can be used helping professionals to enhance behavioral development. Class projects are requiredd. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 476. Group Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Actual group experience in a lecture/lab format. Readings and written assignments focus on organizing groups and skills required of group facilitators. A problem solving/personal growth group meets each week. Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 485. Addiction Studies Practicum. 15 Hours.

Participation in the North Dakota consortia to provide experience in the addiction field. This is a 4.5 month, full time experience, where the student actively participates as an addiction counselor in training. Course restricted to psychology or addiction studies majors.

PSY 486. Addiction Studies Practicum. 15 Hours.

Participation in one of the North Dakota consortia to provide experience in the addiction field. This is the second part of the nine month practicum experience required for licensure as an addiction counselor. The course involves a 4.5 month, full time experience, where the student actively participates as an addition counselor in training. Course restricted to psychology or addiction studies majors.

PSY 491. Senior Seminar in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Overview of psychology as a displine and a synthesis of biological and psychological factors in human behavior. Prerequisites: PSY 111, 241, senior status and psychology major.

PSY 494. Directed Behavorial Research. 1-4 Hour.

This course provides students with the practical applications of research designs. Although a resulting publication is not required for the course, it is desired outcome. Students will need to work with a faculty Sponsor on a specific research project.

PSY 495. Service Learning. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with the ability to work in meaningful community service coupled with instruction about the service and reflection on their service. Prerequisite: Students must be psychology majors in their junior or senior year before enrolling in this course.

PSY 496. Senior Research Paper. 3 Hours.

Students will formulate an original research topic and write a paper in that topic. Restricted to psychology majors and senior status.

PSY 497. Psychology Practicum. 3 Hours.

Placement in an applied setting for practical experience. Prerequisite: Students must be a psychology major in their junior or senior year before enrolling in this class.

PSY 499. Special Topics In Psychology. 1-8 Hour.

SPED Courses

SPED 101. Introduction to IDD. 3 Hours.

A survey of the various types of developmental disabilities, the philosophy of service, person centered planning, working with families, job coaching, and legal and ethical considerations for persons with developmental disabilities.

SPED 110. Introduction to Exceptional Children. 3 Hours.

A survey course examining exceptionalities of learning with a focus on understanding current social and educational responsibilities.

SPED 111. Health Care in IDD I. 3 Hours.

TThis course concentrates on basic medication concepts and procedures, health and wellness issues, nutrition information, and oral hygiene.

SPED 112. Health Care in Developmental Disabilities II. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the most common types of seizures and provides information on how to observe, report, and assist persons during seizures. Included also are techniques of positioning, turning, and transferring persons with physical disabilities. This course provides an introduction to issues in sexuality and also teaches how to support independent living skills in persons with intellectual disabilities.

SPED 113. American Sign Language I. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to American Sign Language. Students develop basic vocabulary and conversation skills. Fundamental aspects of Deaf Culture are incorporated.

SPED 115. American Sign Language II. 3 Hours.

This course is a continuation of ASL I. Students will expand vocabulary and conversation skills. Focus is on a greater understanding of ASL and its cultural features. Prerequisite: Student must complete SPED 113 before enrolling in this class.

SPED 117. Manually Coded English. 3 Hours.

An introduction to Signing Exact English and finger spelling. A basic sign vocabulary is presented.

SPED 120. Intro to Positive Behavior Supports. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on principles of behavior; defining, recording, and charting behavior, and how to write behavioral objectives. It teaches positive behavior support strategies and how to design and implement positive behavior support plans.

SPED 130. Expanding Leisure Options IDD. 1 Hour.

This course focuses on strategies for promoting relationships between people with developmental disabilities and other community members and steps to avoid relationship obstacles. It also describes recreation and leisure concepts, leisure assessments, factors of equipment selection, potential leisure education needs, obstacles to community recreation integration, leisure program planning, and guidelines for leisure program planning and implementation.

SPED 140. Human Development. 3 Hours.

A study of the sequence of human development from conception to late childhood, adolescence through adulthood, with emphasis on motor, language, cognitive, emotional, and social characteristics.

SPED 141. Development of Young Children. 2 Hours.

In this course, students will learn typical and atypical development of children ages birth to age five. The course includes observation of development, introduction to service delivery models, and study of best practices in intervention. Corequisite: Students must enroll in SPED 110 at the same time as this course.

SPED 201. Applied Behavior Analysis for Teachers. 3 Hours.

Learners in this course will be introduced to best practices in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) in the classroom. In addition, students will learn preventative, supportive, and corrective behavioral strategies for individuals with both low and high incidence disabilities. Varying theoretical paradigms related to human behavior will also be explored and considered to understand student behavior. Prerequisite: Students must enroll in SPED 110 at the same time as this course.

SPED 202. Intro to Sensory Disabilities. 3 Hours.

In this introductory course in sensory disabilities, students will learn the dimensions of deaf/hard of hearing, visual impairments, and dual impairments. The content will cover the etiology of sensory disabilities that can result in additional learning challenges. In addition, historical foundations and research evidence upon which educational best practice is based for sensory disabilities is identified. Corequisite: Students must enroll in SPED 110 at the same time as this course.

SPED 210. Intro to Ed of Children w/DHH. 3 Hours.

A foundations course which surveys the history of the education of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. An introduction to present techniques as well as historical philosophies is presented. Prerequisite: SPED 110.

SPED 213. American Sign Language III. 3 Hours.

This advanced course is a continuation of ASL I & II as a tool to enrich their vocabulary and understanding of the structure of ASL. Topics relating to Deaf Culture will be discussed throughout the course as well as opportunities to increase fluency in the language. Prerequisites: SPED 113, SPED 115.

SPED 221. Promoting Personal Outcomes. 2 Hours.

This course introduces a value-based process for developing and evaluating major program goals for persons with developmental disabilities including the relationship of assessment to goal setting and person-centered planning. Students will apply basic strategies for achieving personal outcomes, including support and supervision, adaptations, and assistive technology. Students will learn characteristics and apply instructional interventions for persons with intellectual disabilities including task analysis, response chaining, prompting, shaping and other teaching techniques.

SPED 223. Dual Diagnoses: ID and Mental Health Disorders. 2 Hours.

An overview of issues related to supporting people who experience both intellectual disability and mental health disorders including identification of the need for services, treatment options, and standards for service provision. The course provides information for program coordinators on assessment of mental health disorders, collaboration with community-based team members, pharmacological and behavior support, and cognitive behavioral therapies and approaches with individuals with intellectual disabilities.

SPED 225. Assisting People with Traumatic Brain Injury. 2 Hours.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and how to assist people with TBI and their families. It discusses community resources, assessment issues and strategies, as well as the role of employment consultants in working with people with TBI.

SPED 233. Experience In SPED. 1 Hour.

Through a service learning approach, students will be introduced to a diverse, vibrant, professional community working together with others to ensure that individuals with exceptionalities are valued and included in all aspects of life. Students will be exposed to leadership policy and practices. Corequisite: Students must enroll in SPED 110 at the same time as this course.

SPED 234. Disability and Society. 3 Hours.

This course prepares future leaders to understand new perspectives on viewing disability as a part of a diverse society. Learning experiences are designed to eliminate myths and preconceptions and prepare students to successfully encounter diversity as expressed by people with disabilities who may be colleagues, employees, neighbors, or members of the community.

SPED 250. Developing Communicative Interactions. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to provide training to personnel who work with persons with extensive and pervasive support needs. It is a multimedia training program in the area of social, communicative language skill development, and intervention. The course also discusses effective interpersonal communication.

SPED 255. Aging and IDD. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to address training needs of direct support professionals and human services personnel working with senior citizens with developmental disabilities in community programs. It covers demographic and philosophical considerations, health, social, and legal issues, and coordination of services.

SPED 291. IDD Capstone. 3 Hours.

Capstone seminar on various topics in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities.

SPED 296. Field Experience in IDD. 4 Hours.

Practical experience in the development of individual program plans, medication management; positioning, turning, and transferring techniques; management of seizure disorders; job coaching; participant empowerment; facilitation of services; community networking; facilitation of relationships; provision of person-centered supports; vocational, education, and career support; assessment, documentation; communication; positive behavior supports; and aging issues. Prerequisites: SPED 101, 11, 112, 120, and 221 or instructor permission.

SPED 299. Special Topics In Special Ed. 1-8 Hour.

Research in current trends related to various topic areas in the field of special education.

SPED 302. Language and Communication Interventions. 3 Hours.

Students will learn the characteristics of culture and use of language as it relates to diversity across cultures. Additional focus will be on communication and social interaction alternatives and typical and atypical language development. Students will learn augmentative and alternative communication strategies to support and enhance the verbal and non-verbal communication skills of individuals with exceptional learning needs. Prerequisite: SPED 110 and Admission to Teacher Education.

SPED 310. Intro to Intellectual Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders. 3 Hours.

In this survey course, students will explore definitions and issues related to individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In addition, trends and practices will be discussed in the areas of developmental disabilities. Students will understand the impact of learners' academic and social abilities, attitudes, interests, and values on instruction and career development. Prerequisite: Student must complete SPED 101 or SPED 110 before enrolling in this class.

SPED 311. Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the historical perspective of the autism spectrum as well as the etiology, early detection, assessment, diagnosis and characteristics of persons with ASD throughout the lifespan. Participants will learn a variety of interventions and instructional strategies appropriate in non-educational settings in order to improve an individual's social, behavior and communication skills among other quality of life outcomes. Prerequisite: Students must complete SPED 101 before enrolling in this course.

SPED 312. Intermediate Sign Language. 3 Hours.

A course in American Sign Language that focuses on increasingly complex aspects of the language including vocabulary, grammar, concepts and discourse. Students further develop their fluency in the language. Course content is beyond the fourth level of ASL.

SPED 318. Advanced Interpreting. 3 Hours.

This course covers advanced concepts and skills in the interpreting process. It focuses on refinement of ASL to English and English to ASL interpretation as well as ethical and practical application in the profession. Prerequisite: Students must complete SPED 316 before enrolling in this course.

SPED 340. Assessment in SPED. 4 Hours.

Students will learn to administer and interpret a variety of assessment instruments appropriate for diverse learners. The focus will include the use of legal provisions and ethical principles, screening, pre-referral, referral and classification practices and procedures, for individuals with exceptional learning needs. In addition, curriculum-based assessment will be used to evaluate instruction and monitor student progress. Prerequisite: Student must complete SPED 110 prior to enrolling in this course. Corequisite: must take SPED 494 at the same time as this course. Admission to Teacher Education.

SPED 341. Assessment in Developmental Disabilities. 4 Hours.

Students will gain knowledge in the fundamental concepts of assessment and purposes of various assessment methods in developmental disabilities. Students will also acquire skills in planning for assessment, instrument selection, administration, scoring, interpreting and reporting assessment results. Practical application of assessment skills for person centered planning is required. Prerequisite: Students must complete SPED 101 before enrolling in this course.

SPED 379. Leadership in SPED. 3 Hours.

The student will engage in service learning activities that benefit individuals with diverse learning needs, their families, and community. Students will gain leadership skills through these activities and will understand how their dispositions uphold high standards of competence and integrity. Students will focus on collaboration, partnerships, and ethical and professional practices in the field of special education. Prerequisite: SPED 110 and admission to teacher education.

SPED 410. Introduction to Learning and Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Students will understand the characteristics of individuals with specific learning disabilities, emotional/behavior disorders, and other common conditions such as ADD/ADHD. Students will understand prevalence, etiology, and diagnostic criteria of these disabilities as well as gain awareness of evidence based practices to support these learners. Prerequisite: SPED 110.

SPED 412. Advanced Sign Language. 3 Hours.

A course in American Sign Language that focuses on advanced levels of concept expression and dialogue for a myriad of settings. Course content is beyond the fifth level of ASL.

SPED 420. Inclusive Practices. 3 Hours.

Students will learn methods for differentiating instruction to meet the needs of a diverse range of learners in inclusive settings. Concepts of the shared model of Response to Intervention (RTI) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) will be emphasized. A variety of co-teaching practices will be modeled within this course. In addition, collaborative partnerships with school personnel and community members for integrating individuals with exceptional learning needs will be demonstrated. Prerequisites: SPED 110 and admission to teacher education.

SPED 440. Instructional Interventions for People with DD. 3 Hours.

This course is designed so students can attain knowledge of theories and research that form the basis for instructional interventions for adults with developmental disabilities. Students will learn how to develop and select instructional content and strengthen their understanding of resources and strategies for adults who require a Person Centered Plan. The course focuses on how to identify functional skills in a variety of domains, write goals and objectives, develop a task analysis, design intervention plans, collect and graph baseline and instructional data and then make data-based decisions. Prerequisite: Students must complete SPED 101 before enrolling in this course.

SPED 441. Methods for High Incidence Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Students will have knowledge of theories and research that form the basis for curriculum development and instructional practice for students identified as having high incidence disabilities. Students will develop and select instructional content with resources and strategies for students described as needing intermittent or limited levels of support. Students will learn to make responsive adjustments to lesson planning and instructional pedagogy based on assessment and data-based decision making. Students will develop and implement comprehensive individualized education programs in collaboration with various team members. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

SPED 442. Methods for Low Incidence Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Students will have knowledge of theories and research that form the basis for curriculum development and instructional practice for students who have been identified as having low incidence disabilities. Students will develop and select instructional content with resources and strategies for students described as needing extensive and pervasive levels of support. Students will learn to make responsive adjustments to lesson planning and instructional pedagogy based on assessment and data-based decision making. Students will develop and implement comprehensive, annual individualized education programs in collaboration with various team members. Students will demonstrate techniques in transferring, positioning, lifting and CPI training. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, and students must complete SPED 110 before enrolling in this course. Corequisite: Students must enroll in SPED 494 at the same time as this course.

SPED 444. Transition to Adult Life. 3 Hours.

Students will have knowledge in designing and using methods for assessing transition instruction for students of all ages with a special emphasis on students with a transition IEP (16-21). An emphasis on functional academics, vocational training, life and social skills development, recreation/leisure opportunities, and post-secondary training will be included. Students will understand their role in developing transitional individual education programs and how to work effectively with human services providers. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

SPED 445. Collaboration in Special Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines issues and effective strategies for successful collaboration with interdisciplinary team members so students with disabilities can be included in the general education classroom. Students will understand the importance of fostering responsive, respectful, and beneficial relationships between families and professionals. Students will learn how to communicate and problem solve effectively with other team members including family members and legal guardians. Prerequisite: SPED 110 and admission to Teacher Education. Students who are enrolled in the BAS in ISIL are exempt from admission to teacher education.

SPED 446. Interdisciplinary Teaming and Community Collaboration in Human Services. 3 Hours.

This course examines issues and effective strategies for successful collaboration with interdisciplinary team members so people with disabilities can be included in their communities and meet their personal outcomes. Students will describe the critical aspects that foster responsive, respectful, and beneficial relationships between families and professionals. Students will demonstrate how to communicate and problem solve effectively with other team members including direct support professionals, consultants, family members and legal guardians. Prerequisite: Students must complete SPED 101 before enrolling in this course.

SPED 454. Models & Strategies in Employment for People with Developmental Disabilities. 4 Hours.

Students will learn effective models and strategies of individualized employment support for individuals with developmental disabilities from high school transition through retirement. Students will learn about and apply current best practices to support employment outcomes. Prerequisite: Students must complete SPED 101 before enrolling in this course.

SPED 491. Senior Seminar in IDD. 4 Hours.

Seminar on various topics for seniors in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities.

SPED 494. Practicum In Special Education. 4 Hours.

Students will participate in a practicum with their school partners to design, implement, and evaluate instructional practices. Prospective special educators will develop and apply knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to the roles for which they are being prepared. Prerequisite: Students must complete SPED 110 before enrolling in this course. Corequisites: Students must also enroll in SPED 340, 441, 442, and 444 at the same time as this course.

SPED 497. Externship in IDD. 8 Hours.

Students will participate in a final practicum in the filed of human services and be supervised by agency personnel in a variety of adult agencies. Participating agencies include residential, vocational, recreational, social, protection, and advocacy as well as case management agencies serving adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

SPED 499. Special Topics in SPED. 1-8 Hour.

Research in current trends related to various topic areas in the field of special education.

HON Courses

HON 191H. The Honors Community. 1 Hour.

This course introduces students to the MSU honors program. Informal conversations with MSU faculty, administrators, honors students, staff, and community leaders will familiarize students with the university, the community, the honors approach to learning. Students also investigate or discover new or existing passions through student-created learning experiences (SCLE), created in consultation with the instructor. Students present, evaluate, and reflect on their learning and experiences related to the SCLE. Prerequisite: Student must be admitted to the honors program before enrolling in this course.

HON 199H. Honors Special Topics. 1-4 Hour.

An Honors-level exploration of special topic area determined by participating department. Content will vary.

HON 251H. Culinary Arts & Entertaining. 1 Hour.

A hands-on cuisine from a particular geographical region of the world. Readings on historical, social, economic, and artistic aspects of the relevant culture that pertain to the culinary arts. Applied lessons in menu planning, table setting, and food preparation/presentation. Additional course fee covers food costs. Prerequisite: Student must be admitted into the Honors Program before enrolling in this class.

HON 252H. Visionaries of the Past. 2 Hours.

A thematically organized survey of "Great Works" by noted authors and artists. Literature, art, theatre, film, and music will be included. These works have demonstrated enduring relevance, significant historical or social impact, and/or recognized aesthetic value. Broad themes in any given semester might include, for example, utopia/dystopia, human justice, social conflict, etc. Prerequisite(s): Honors Program admission or permission of instructor.

HON 254H. Information in the Digital Age. 3 Hours.

This course cultivates the skills needed to define, find, evaluate, select, use, and communicate information effectively and ethically. Emphasis on hands-on application of knowledge. Prerequisite: Student must be admitted to the honors program or have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 and instructor consent before enrolling in this class.

HON 264H. Thinking Outside the Box. 3 Hours.

A seminar that emphasizes the practice of intellectual inquiry, innovative pedagogies, and/or interdisciplinary connections. The class will rotate between academic colleges and departments. Prerequisite(s): Honors Program Admission or 3.30 cumulative GPA and permission of instructor.

HON 299H. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

HON 351H. Integrity & The Examined Life. 3 Hours.

This seminar addresses the two themes of moral integrity and Socrates' claim that only the examined life is truly worth living. The focus is on great works, both written and visual (movies), and the students are challenged to develop their own views on a number of substantive matters. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted to the Honors program or have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 and instructor consent before enrolling in this course.

HON 391H. Community Problem-Solving. 3 Hours.

A seminar in civic engagement. Students will work with a community leader or community agency to identify, understand, and formulate solutions to complex, real-life community challenges. Emphasis on political empowerment, collaborative work with diverse constituencies, research, data analysis, and problem-solving. Prerequisite: Student must be admitted into the Honors Program before enrolling in this class.

HON 395H. Citizenship and Service. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary exploration of community-building, social justice, and human liberation that engages students directly in meaningful community service. Study of history, theory, and the local/global realities of community-building; reflection upon characteristics of a just society, individual responsibility, and potential leadership roles. Prerequisite: Student must be admitted to the honors program or have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 and instructor consent before enrolling in this course.

HON 399H. Honors Special Topics. 1-4 Hour.

An Honors-level exploration of special topic area, determined by participating department. Content will vary.

HON 450H. Honors Thesis/Project Proposal. 1 Hour.

The honors thesis/project is the Honors Program's capstone experience. It allows students to explore academic areas of their most passionate interests and engage in the process of discovery and scholarship. In this course, students get a head-start on their thesis/project. They use this time to 1) explore potential thesis/project topics; 2) identify an advisor; 3) review relevant research literature; and 4) develop a comprehensive proposal. Prerequisite: Student must be admitted into the Honors Program before enrolling in this class.

HON 451H. Honors Thesis/Project. 1-3 Hour.

The honors thesis/project is the Honors Program's capstone experience. It allows students to explore academic areas of their most passionate interests and engage in the process of discovery and scholarship under the direction of the Honors Director and faculty advisor. An honors thesis/poject can be written in any discipline and may take a variety of formats-from a traditional scholarly paper to a design portfolio; from a business plan to a performance; from a service project to a scientific research project - but always includes a written component, a public presentation, and a defense before a faculty committee. Students will work with the Honors Director to determine the appropriate number of credits needed to complete the requirements of the course. Prerequisites: Student must complete HON 450H and have instructor consent before enrolling.

HON 494H. Honors Independent Study. 1-8 Hour.

HON 497H. Honors Ind. Study. 1-4 Hour.

Course Approved With Program Approval 3/94 Dropped Q For Pre- Req Purposes.

HON 498H. Honors Ind. Study. 1-4 Hour.

Course Approved With Program Approval 3/94 Dropped Q For Pre- Req Purposes.

HON 499. Special Topics. 1-8 Hour.

SCE Courses

SCE 101. Environments and Societies. 3 Hours.

Explores the intertwined relationships between communities and their environments at the local and global level from a social science perspective topics will include human impact on the environment and vice versa, the role of geography in human relations, historical perspectives on the role environment plays, resource use versus conservation, public and urban space issues, economic and ethical implications of environmental policy, and social problems related to environmental impacts that are unequally distributed among demographic groups of society.

SCE 102. Environments and Humanities. 3 Hours.

Students will be introduced to the basic underpinnings of environmental literature, ecocriticism, and place studies (with a focus on the US West), and will consider how place or nature intersect with race, class and gender. Student will also explore the basic underpinnings of environmental art, land art, eco-art, and public art. In addition, students will be introduced to environmental ethics, such as the duties to and rights of non-human species and responsibilities of humans to each other and the environment.

SCE 103. Environments and Sciences. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to environmental science, including environmental policies and the roles of science in policy development. Topics addressed include environmental systems, biodiversity, conservation and preservation, food and agriculture, environmental health, water and air pollution, global climate change, earth resources, energy, solid and hazardous wastes, and sustainability. The laboratory includes local field trips as well as laboratory investigations. Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours.

SCE 260. Collaborative Study. 3 Hours.

Collaborative investigation of a particular local community and environmental issue by a group of students using an interdisciplinary approach. Topic is set prior to the course based on student interests. Prerequisite: Students must complete SCE 101, 102, or 103 before enrolling in this course.

SCE 301. Environmental Values & Ethics. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the field of inquiry that addresses values of nature and the ethical responsibilities of human to each other and to the environment with respect to community and environment issues. Different types of ethics will be studied and applied to concrete examples of community and environment problems. Examples of the different ethics include utilitarian ethics, deontic ethics, and concepts of justice. Also to be studied include whether duties or obligations exist to individuals-including nonhumans, other species as a group, ecosystems or the biosphere. Prerequisite: Student must complete SCE 101, 102, or 103 before enrolling in this class.

SCE 394. Directed Research. 1-3 Hour.

Investigation of a particular local community and environmental issue using an interdisciplinary approach. Topic is set prior to the course based on student interests and community needs. This course consists of an individual research project that is designed by the student with the help of a faculty mentor. It provides a platform for students to be engaged in research that is perhaps more focused on their particular field of interest, but that addresses a problem or issue of broader interest and that incorporates an appropriate level of interdisciplinary treatment. The research may be conducted under the direction of a single faculty member. In some cases, however, the nature of the project may require more than one faculty mentor. The research project may be an outgrowth of a SCE 291 Topics and Projects in SCE course, which is typically itself an outgrowth of SCE 101 Introduction to SCE. 3 hours per week per credit hour. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Students must complete SCE 260 before enrolling in this course.

SCE 397. Internship. 3 Hours.

An internship is a work-related learning experience for individuals who wish to develop hands on work experience in a certain occupational field or profession, or provide valuable service to a community and its citizens. An internship is an excellent way to determine if the field or profession is the best career option to pursue. Interns not only gain practical work experience and build experience in a given profession or field, they also have the opportunity to share their academic and scholarly knowledge with people in a given community. Prerequisite: Students must take SCE 101, 102, or 103 before enrolling in this course.

SCE 494. Senior Capstone. 2 Hours.

Students, having completed their research or creative project on a particular community and environmental issue in SCE 394, write a thesis, give a public presentation, and defend their work to their thesis committee. Prerequisite: Students must complete SCE 394 before enrolling in this course.